Home > Celebrations > the James Soriano article – when truth hurts, pinoy netizens ache

the James Soriano article – when truth hurts, pinoy netizens ache

the pinoy twitter world is once again abuzz, this time with a fellow named james soriano who posted an article in manila bulletin about the language, actually languages pinoys use – english and filipino.

we do not understand at all the flak soriano is getting in the pinoy social media world  – the soriano article is reality. what you read there and how pinoys use languages, english and filipino in particular are all true.

the article talks  about soriano’s journey with filipino and how he started young and what new things he has discovered when he went to college. his experience is also true for most pinoys who go through schooling in private schools in the country. nothing wrong with that at all.

we also find it interesting, in fact ironic that almost all of those who were attacking and disagreeing with soriano were  tweeting in english and not in filipino.  which is exactly one of the points of the soriano article – that many pinoys being bi-lingual use the language they find most appropriate depending on the situation and the audience or receiver of the communication.

we think the adverse reactions soriano has been getting is being caused by the fact that truth hurts. readers just can’t accept the fact that even in language, there is a divide in philippine society.

we know of the divide in wealth, opportunities, jobs, justice and education in philippine society where the rich are able to get the best and the mostest (intended) while the poor make do with meager offerings. the truth hurts to know that that also exists in language.

with inequitable distribution of wealth comes inequitable opportunities in education that results to inequitable distribution of language skills and ends up in inequitable distribution of job opportunities which goes back to inequitable distribution of wealth.

the divide, a wide one between the poor and the rich is one of the most enduring problems in philippine society. it is not only an issue of poverty, it is an issue of inequitable distribution of wealth where a very small portion of the population control a very large portion of the wealth of the country while a very large population are poor dividing among themselves a very meager portion of the wealth of the country.

marketing puts it at 85% of the population belonging to the poor, the DE socio eco class while only 15% at most belong to the ABC socio-eco class.

if there is a wide divide in socio-economic wealth, why shouldn’t there be a wide divide in the use of language? although they might not know it yet but that is what most of the critics of soriano cannot seem to accept.

nowhere in the article did soriano disparage or insult the poor nor did he express his elitist sentiments, all that he has done was state facts on the use of language. it is a fact that when we are in the streets and when we talk to ordinary folks, we use filipino while when we are at work, in school oir even at home, we use english. more glaringly when we are in school, we almost always use english.

how can we not use english in school, specially college when the medium of instruction in private colleges and even in public colleges is in english? books are in english, even road signs are in english. where in that did soriano fail?

every pinoy know that english skills is very important in finding a job. in the country. call center jobs, the sunshine industry in the country has been hiring the most number  of new graduates and young people and english skills as most key for these jobs. jobs outside the country,  for OFWs, also put a premium on good english skills. sometimes in some of these jobs, the course you take is less important but english skills is a number one skill local and foreign employers look for.

ask anyone in business and those in the universities and they will tell you the country’s educational system need to improve it’s teaching of english to pinoy students. the country’s declining proficiency in english is one of the reasons why pinoy graduates are getting less competitive.

on the other hand, the BPO industry will tell you that we have gained significant market share in the global market, we are now 2nd or 3rd in the world because of the pinoy labor force’s proficiency in english compared to other countries. but the same BPO industry will tell you that it has been increasingly difficult to hire pinoys for call center jobs because of the declining english proficiency of pinoy graduates.

i think by and large the critics and attackers of soriano have misunderstood the article. they probably need to read the article again and understand what is there, not what is “between the lines”. but i doubt if there is anything written between the lines.

the upside is that the high number of attackers and those disagreeing with soriano’s article are in effect professing their sympathy with the poor, the uneducated. they seem to be going against soriano as they want to defend the poor. the only question is – why is it that these same defenders of the not learned posting mostly in english and not in filipino? the fact that most of the post in english proves exactly the point soriano is raising in his article.

Language, learning, identity, privilege

Ithink

By JAMES SORIANO
August 24, 2011, 4:06am

MANILA, Philippines — English is the language of learning. I’ve known this since before I could go to school. As a toddler, my first study materials were a set of flash cards that my mother used to teach me the English alphabet.

is this james soriano when he was in high school?

My mother made home conducive to learning English: all my storybooks and coloring books were in English, and so were the cartoons I watched and the music I listened to. She required me to speak English at home. She even hired tutors to help me learn to read and write in English.

In school I learned to think in English. We used English to learn about numbers, equations and variables. With it we learned about observation and inference, the moon and the stars, monsoons and photosynthesis. With it we learned about shapes and colors, about meter and rhythm. I learned about God in English, and I prayed to Him in English.

Filipino, on the other hand, was always the ‘other’ subject — almost a special subject like PE or Home Economics, except that it was graded the same way as Science, Math, Religion, and English. My classmates and I used to complain about Filipino all the time. Filipino was a chore, like washing the dishes; it was not the language of learning. It was the language we used to speak to the people who washed our dishes.

We used to think learning Filipino was important because it was practical: Filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom. It was the language of the streets: it was how you spoke to the tindera when you went to the tindahan, what you used to tell your katulong that you had an utos, and how you texted manong when you needed “sundo na.”

These skills were required to survive in the outside world, because we are forced to relate with the tinderas and the manongs and the katulongs of this world. If we wanted to communicate to these people — or otherwise avoid being mugged on the jeepney — we needed to learn Filipino.

That being said though, I was proud of my proficiency with the language. Filipino was the language I used to speak with my cousins and uncles and grandparents in the province, so I never had much trouble reciting.

It was the reading and writing that was tedious and difficult. I spoke Filipino, but only when I was in a different world like the streets or the province; it did not come naturally to me. English was more natural; I read, wrote and thought in English. And so, in much of the same way that I learned German later on, I learned Filipino in terms of English. In this way I survived Filipino in high school, albeit with too many sentences that had the preposition ‘ay.’

It was really only in university that I began to grasp Filipino in terms of language and not just dialect. Filipino was not merely a peculiar variety of language, derived and continuously borrowing from the English and Spanish alphabets; it was its own system, with its own grammar, semantics, sounds, even symbols.

But more significantly, it was its own way of reading, writing, and thinking. There are ideas and concepts unique to Filipino that can never be translated into another. Try translating bayanihan, tagay, kilig or diskarte.

Only recently have I begun to grasp Filipino as the language of identity: the language of emotion, experience, and even of learning. And with this comes the realization that I do, in fact, smell worse than a malansang isda. My own language is foreign to me: I speak, think, read and write primarily in English. To borrow the terminology of Fr. Bulatao, I am a split-level Filipino.

But perhaps this is not so bad in a society of rotten beef and stinking fish. For while Filipino may be the language of identity, it is the language of the streets. It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.

It is neither the language of the classroom and the laboratory, nor the language of the boardroom, the court room, or the operating room. It is not the language of privilege. I may be disconnected from my being Filipino, but with a tongue of privilege I will always have my connections.

So I have my education to thank for making English my mother language.

james soriano is supposed to be a senior at ateneo de manila university and writes a column at manila bulletin. we googled “james soriano ateneo” and this is what came up :

AHS senior James Soriano is best Filipino high school debater

date posted: 2007-08-23 13:43:17

The organizers of the 2007 World Schools Debating Championships (WSDC) recently released the official individual rankings of the Top 50 Individual Speakers in a field of 156 world-class debaters representing 35 countries.

James Soriano, a member of Ateneo de Manila High School Class 4A and the chairman of the Sanggu-HS Executive Board, was ranked 31st Over-All Best Speaker with a speaker’s tab of 72.78.  This is the highest rank thus far obtained by a Filipino high school debater in the 19-year history of the annual tournament. The last time a Filipino debater entered the exclusive Top 50 bracket was in the 2003 WSDC held in Lima, Peru when debater Eric John Paredes of Paref Southridge ranked no. 42 with a total score of 72.08333.

http://www.admu.edu.ph/index.php?p=120&type=2&sec=27&aid=4036

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  1. J.M.
    August 26, 2011 at 1:16 pm

    Just an observation: when Filipinos talk to foreign expats, they try their best to mimic the accents. The tone of voice is softer and refined, as if one were in a beauty pagent’s q and a portion. And these people would be regarded as cultured, learned individuals.

    And when they do speak in Filipino, suddenly everything is reversed. Expletives shower left, right and center, tones are higher and banshee-like with more expletives for emphasis. From cultured and learned, the same person becomes another person entirely.

    What James wrote only made me ask – why does it seem that the Filipino language is reserved for informality?

    P.S

    I realize this reply is in English. I admit, that Filipino was never my best subject in school.

  2. galit
    August 26, 2011 at 1:25 pm

    blah blah medyo nakikita ko kung ano ang gustong palabasin ng tarantadong to. ang problema lang e napakaburgis nya kung magsulat. malinaw kung paano nya maliitin yung mga gumagamit ng filipino. ungas!

    • August 26, 2011 at 4:40 pm

      exactly what is burgis in what he wrote? there is nothing insulting in that piece.

      • you are an idiot
        August 27, 2011 at 1:17 am

        “We used to think learning Filipino was important because it was practical: Filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom. It was the language of the streets: it was how you spoke to the tindera when you went to the tindahan, what you used to tell your katulong that you had an utos, and how you texted manong when you needed “sundo na.”

        These skills were required to survive in the outside world, because we are forced to relate with the tinderas and the manongs and the katulongs of this world. If we wanted to communicate to these people — or otherwise avoid being mugged on the jeepney — we needed to learn Filipino.”

        Read beyond the lines. LOL. I am fluent in English as well but not once did I turn my back on Tagalog.

        • August 28, 2011 at 9:04 am

          Sige nga, bumili ka nga sa sari-sari store gamit ang English. Kung di ka pagtawanan ni ate dahil sa trying hard mong effort.

        • U are a bigger idiot
          October 8, 2011 at 11:43 pm

          thank you for advertising yourself. that would really help the current state of our wonderful language. This article did well to remind us in what a sad state our linguistic identity is. Why is this honesty faced with such denial and brainless comments?

      • Anya
        August 27, 2011 at 2:09 am

        read again. as many times needed for the effect of the words used.

        “We used to think learning Filipino was important because it was practical: Filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom. It was the language of the streets: it was how you spoke to the tindera when you went to the tindahan, what you used to tell your katulong that you had an utos, and how you texted manong when you needed “sundo na.”

        These skills were required to survive in the outside world, because we are forced to relate with the tinderas and the manongs and the katulongs of this world. If we wanted to communicate to these people — or otherwise avoid being mugged on the jeepney — we needed to learn Filipino.”

        not burgis huh. think again.

    • rene
      February 2, 2012 at 10:03 am

      sir totoo naman talaga yung sinabi nya ehh..dba pag sa opisina tayo or sa mga gatherings english naman talaga yung ginagamit na salita…kahit sa court room sa senado or sa congress dba english naman..totoo naman talaga na pag c manong driver o c ate tindera tagalog yung ginamit natin kasi bka hind ka maintindhan..pag sa bahay with your katulong ganun din naman dba?

  3. August 26, 2011 at 1:26 pm

    Though people may be commenting in english, do we treat Filipino as inferior to English? no. I speak Filipino, am I not learned?

    Best Filipino High School debater? shame on you. Remove the Filipino from there.

    • August 26, 2011 at 4:44 pm

      when do you speak or write in filipino and to whom? and english?

  4. Matthew
    August 26, 2011 at 1:37 pm

    Hey, thanks for copy-pasting the article in your blog since the one on Manila Bulletin’s down already. Anyway, there is no need to violently react to this article–only a stupid, uneducated, masa Filipino who has cheap access to the Internet would actually do that. He’s not insulting the Filipino language here and he’s probably even trying to make us think about our language and what we can do for it. Because seriously, it’s been plagued by so many things over the past decades–conyo speak, txt speak, jeje-speak, etc.

    Ang Filipino kasi, mas madaling sabihin kesa isulat o basahin. Pag magsusulat ka Filipino ang dami-dami mong kailangang alalahaning punctuation marks lalo na yung apostrophe dahil ibang-iba yung pormal na baybay ng mga salita natin kesa pag sinabi mo lang. Pag babasahin mo naman, napaka-boring, lalo na kung sobrang pormal. Isa pa, laging iniisip ng mga Pilipino na lahat ng salita may English translation, e sa totoo lang naman, wala. Pwede namang Taglish. E Taglish naman talaga yung ginagamit natin sa pang-araw araw.

    Tapos ano ba ang papel na ginagampanan ng Filipino sa kulturang popular? Wala, pang-insulto lang, pang-katatawanan, pambara sa mga kontrabida, pang-joke ni Vice Ganda. Yun lang. Hindi pa nga witty yung mga jokes na nasa telebisyon e. Todo tangkilik naman ang mga masa. Tapos sila rin ang maninisi’t merong mga taong tulad ni James Soriano na ganito ang karanasan sa Filipino.

    If we really want to save the language I think we have to give it relevance to the other fields of knowledge and culture and actually apply it to content that has intellectual depth. Di naman kailangan tagalugin ang mga mathematical terms or whatnot. Kailangan lang gandahan yung gamit at gawing makatuturan.

    • Demi Noor
      August 28, 2011 at 3:24 pm

      anong sabi mo? ang filipino ay pang-insulto at pangkatatawanan lang? malamang kasi di ka nakakabasa ng mga matitinong babasahin sa filipino. ikaw yung sinasabi mong “stupid, uneducated masa Filipino brown trash who has cheap access to the internet”. wala kang access sa magagandang library at di ka marunong ng art, literature at class kaya ganyan ka. wag ka na mag-komento kung di mo makuha ang punto. ang sinasabi niya mas “proud & happy” siya na ingles ang wika niya gayong sa pinas siya lumaki at naninirahan at marunong naman siya ng tagalog. ganito na ba kalala ang western colonial mentality to renounce your own language at maging proud ka pa? and to think some “filipinos” like you think this is okay because it’s only a reflection of our current society and it’s because “the truth hurts” ek-ek. of course the truth hurts, and we want to change it that’s why we are reacting. kailangan bang i-celebrate ang pagmamarunong mo sa ingles at pagtutya mo sa filipino gayong mukha ka namang ita? anong pinapakita ninyo sa mga kabataan sa pagkibit-balikat ninyo? hmmm?

    • September 6, 2011 at 7:01 pm

      What amazes me more than anything that you wrote is the fact that you can’t read between the lines.

      • September 6, 2011 at 11:39 pm

        i have explained why reading between the lines is a very unreliable way to understand the meaning of an article. ask 10 people to read between the lines and you can get 10 different results.

  5. August 26, 2011 at 3:00 pm

    “the soriano article is reality. what you read there and how pinoys use languages, english and pilipino in aprticular[sic] is all true.” – what reality to do you live in? a reality where you only speak our lingua franca to manongs, tinderas, katulongs and drivers to “make sundo” you? wow. that is one comfortable, convenient, and skewed reality you live in. it’s a reality for you and your privileged friends, not everybody.

    “that is also true for most pinoys who go through schooling in private schools in the country.”- and how many pinoys go schooling in private schools for his article to generalize that Filipino is not the language of the “learned”?

    “we also find it interesting, in fact ironic that almost all of those who were attacking and disagreeing with soriano were tweeting in english and not in pilipino.” – it’s not ironic. he might not get the message if it weren’t in his mother tongue.

    “we think the adverse reactions soriano has been getting is being caused by the fact that truth hurts.” – the elitist truth does hurt because it undermines the manongs, the tinderas, the katulongs, the drivers, and other Filipinos who use their native tongue as a language.

    “readers just can’t accept the fact that even in lanaguage, there is a divide in philippine society.” – no. they just can’t accept that there’s someone in the privileged side of this divide of which you speak of that is as ignorant and self-serving enough to come up with such an article that is a disservice to a language his countrymen use. (eh kung ganyan ang tingin niya sa tagalog, pano pa kaya sa mga katutubong wika?)

    “we know of the divide in wealth, opportunities, jobs, justice and education in philippine society where the rich are able to get the best and the mostest while the poor make do with meager offerings. the truth hurts to know that that also exists in language.” – that is true. Soriano proved it. With apologists like you and Soriano, you’re not making it easier.

    mostest. wtf.

    • pie
      August 26, 2011 at 8:10 pm

      add to that the fact that “language of the streets” in other countries are also their own language, even in English-speaking countries. And that when employers of OFWs “katulong had an utos”, and employers of OFW “manong when they needed “sundo na”, they are also being spoken to in English.

      • August 26, 2011 at 8:18 pm

        soriano’s point is in the philippines, the language of the street is filipino which is absolutely true. that is a fact.

        • Usisera
          August 26, 2011 at 10:34 pm

          But is it a fact that Filipino isn’t the “language of the learned”?

          What is he saying? Na bobo si manong driver at manang tindera? That my mom — who raised three kids on her own, sent them to private schools, even sent them overseas to study, yet blushes when spoken English to — is bobo?

          That, sir, I can’t defend. How could you?

          • August 26, 2011 at 10:51 pm

            nowhere in that article did soriano say those who speak in filipino are “bobo”.

            • yana
              August 27, 2011 at 1:30 am

              right…only that they are most likely the “tinderas, the manongs and the drivers. that’s a whole lot better isn’t it?

            • Jeproks
              August 27, 2011 at 1:59 am

              But he did say that Filipino is not the language of the learned. So if you speak Filipino and it is your primary language, what does that make you?

            • August 27, 2011 at 11:49 am

              usisera doesn’t mean “bobo” as in “bobo” per se. plus, even if it isn’t written in the article explicitly, it’s not hard to read between the lines or did you not get how condescending his article is towards the masang Filipino?

            • muning
              August 28, 2011 at 12:09 am

              Nakapunta na ba si James Soriano sa Cebu? Sikat kaya ang mga nagta-Tagalog dun.

              Filipino as language of the learned? I doubt it.
              May mga marunong mag-Ingles pero makikitid ang pang-unawa.

              Sana ay hindi kayo isa sa kanila.

        • August 27, 2011 at 4:09 pm

          that is not a fact and that is not absolutely true. as he is referring to Tagalog as Filipino, it is clearly not the “language of the streets” in the Mountain Province or in the Visayan Islands. therefore, his point could not possibly be in the Philippines as a whole but more likely the Philippines he knows– which is somewhere between Katipunan, Metro Manila, and the province he goes to. his equating Filipino (Tagalog) as “the language of the street” is not the absolute truth but a misguided opinion. my point is, he is a victim of his own class.

        • sweet19
          August 27, 2011 at 9:50 pm

          come on guys! it is NOT a STREET its a CULTURAL thing and its a language. Language is part of our culture, it is also what makes us a Filipino. they are related got it?!!!

        • jyd
          August 28, 2011 at 2:18 pm

          what you call the language of the street is the language of masang Filipino.. even the President of the Philippines preferred it in his speeches..
          ..why mock the language that helps you live in the outside world..which is in fact..the real world..it’s as if your isolating yourself to this country..then move out of here…

    • September 1, 2011 at 4:46 pm

      Hell ako ng isang Amerikano at hindi ko alam ang isa dilaan ng Filipino sa at pa Gusto ko ay naapi sa pamamagitan ng kung ano ang sinabi.Ikaw sino ka kahit kung saan ka ipinanganak o anong wika ang iyong magsalita.Ipinagmamalaki ng kung sino ka at kung saan ang iyong dugo ay mula.Ito ay para sa dahilan na ako humagulgol ang mawalan ng aking kultura at ang aking “ina” at “ama” wika.Lamang dahil ako ay ipinanganak sa America ay hindi nangangahulugan na dapat kong kalimutan ang sakripisyo aking mga tao ay ginawa upang makakuha ng ako dito.Sa pamamagitan ng lahat ng mga karapatan, ang aking pamilya ay dapat na na-burn sa kamatayan sa lahat ng mga iba pang mga Russian Hudyo sa ang Holocaust.Subalit, kami pinamamahalaang upang mabuhay upang mabuhay ng isang mas mahusay na buhay.Hindi ako mali.Hindi ako rich.Ko na nagtrabaho ang aking puwit ng lahat ng buhay aking at ako pa rin sa ibaba ang kahirapan antas dito.Ngunit pa rin ako nagpapasalamat.Huwag hayaan ang sarili maging tulad ng faceless masa at naging isa sa mga maraming mga na lakad, makipag-usap, at kumilos ang lahat ng mga parehong.Ang iyong kultura ay ang iyong kayamanan.Mahalin ito!

      • February 19, 2012 at 10:55 am

        wow!! I like your comment! even though your not that good in tagalog but you’ve tried to express it in a way that you can prove your love for your kultura at bayan.. its nice to know that someone who was raised in other country love Philippines and tagalog like it was the only place that he could turn and live.. I hope James Soriano will realize it too…

  6. Jay
    August 26, 2011 at 3:21 pm

    It pays to be respected.

  7. anj
    August 26, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    Yes truth hurts. It is true that a lot of educated Filipinos are really good in English. It is also true that English is a very critical tool in order to compete internationally in the corporate world or the academe. There is nothing wrong about being great in English. I am not a Filipino purist – as you pointed out, here I am writing this in English.

    What I find objectionable about Mr. Soriano’s article is the implication that Filipino is the language of the working class. “Working class” is even putting it nicely, in his article, he makes them clearly second class citizens. Filipino is my mother tongue, and as an OFW, this gives me great comfort and kinship with my fellowmen here in a foreign land. While I use English at work and in daily life, that does not take away the value of Filipino in any way. I just don’t see the point of belittling Filipino just to make the point that English is a very important and useful language to master.

    • Marc
      August 26, 2011 at 7:48 pm

      Even if there’s a tinge of truth in his article, he has no right to put into ridicule Pilipino, the national language of Filipino. Declare him “persona non grata”!

    • notnot
      August 28, 2011 at 5:02 am

      sa totoo lng po dito sa saudi palagay natin mga 1.2 million ang OFW ilang percent ho ba ang trabaho na kailangan ang magaling mag english? Baka po di pa umabot sa 5% lng, karamihan ho dahil sa kakayanan o tinatawag po na skilled worker kaya sila nakapagtrabaho dito. Tingnan po natin ang mga job hiring sa POEA halos po walang nakalagay sa batayan ng mga employer ang magaling sa english skilled ho ang hinahanap. Kaya maraming nurse sa US,CANADA at UK di dahil na gayang gaya natin ang english nila, dahil tayong mga pilipino ay likas na maalaga at magaling kaya gustong gusto ng mga employer ang mga nurses natin. Kaya hindi ho natin masabi na lahat ng bihasa sa pag english ay may magandang kinabukasan. Nasa diskarte at pagsisikap po kung paanu tayo aangat sa buhay. hindi ho sapat ang bisaha lng sa pagsalita ng english para tayo umasenso kailangan din ng sipag at tiyaga sabi pa nga ni villar. gumamit po tayo ng english kung ito ay sa palagay mo nakakatulong choice ho natin yan pero huwag po naman natin ipagwalang bahala ang sarili nating wika igalang po natin ito at huwag bastosin.

  8. anj
    August 26, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    It is true that a lot of educated Filipinos are really good in English. It is also true that English is a very critical tool in order to compete internationally in the corporate world or the academe. There is nothing wrong about being great in English. I am not a Filipino purist – as you pointed out, here I am writing this in English.
    What I find objectionable about Mr. Soriano’s article is the implication that Filipino is the language of the working class. “Working class” is even putting it nicely, in his article, he makes them clearly second class citizens. Filipino is my mother tongue, and as an OFW, this gives me great comfort and kinship with my fellowmen here in a foreign land. While I use English at work and in daily life, that does not take away the value of Filipino in any way. I just don’t see the point of belittling Filipino just to make the point that English is a very important and useful language to master.

  9. Ray Estrada
    August 26, 2011 at 4:35 pm

    I can fully understand where Mr. Soriano is coming from given that he grew up in an environment where English was the mode of communication. I will also say that the article, sans the rather callous delivery, is very well written. I will even agree that most of his points about English being the language of the boardroom, operating room, etc.. What I will not agree with in any way, shape, or form is his statement that Pilipino is not the language of the learned. Clearly, his definition of being learned and my definition are diametric opposites. It is also very clear that his opinion stems from the fact that his command of the Pilipino language is rudimentary at best. I will attribute this to his youth, albeit quiet wise beyond his years, he still needs to learn temperance for this can only come with age. Having said this, I am willing to cut him some slack. Perhaps Mr. Soriano has yet to meet some of the very fluent Filipino scholars who can make one’s eyes water by their command of Pilipino. It is, when used properly, just as picturesque and poetic as any Old World language. Add to that the fact that it is our own and one’s sense of pride should gush forth. One need not go so far. Mr. Soriano, do yourself a favor. Get a Tagalog-English dictionary and translate what our Pambansang Awit is saying and you will immediately see what I mean. It might even enlighten you somewhat and perhaps reshape your opinion of this “Language of the Streets”. By the way, it’s Pilipino and not Filipino! Filipino is commonly used to depict the nationality and not the language.

    Ray Estrada

    • August 26, 2011 at 10:46 pm

      Para sa iyong kaalaman, ang wika ay binabaybay gamit ang F. “FILIPINO.” Hindi na angkop gamitin ang PILIPINO bilang pantawag sa ating pambansang wika na siyang unang pagkakakilanlan nito mula noong 1959. Naganap ang pagbabagong ito sa bisa ng saligang batas 1973 at ipinagpatuloy sa bisa ng Artikulo XIV seksyon 6 ng saligang batas 1987.

      So please, do not even attempt to stress its “Pilipino and not Filipino!”

      • Robert
        August 27, 2011 at 12:54 pm

        It maybe more appropriate to use Pilipino in native tongue and Filipino when use in official documents like laws written in English [English being our medium in government and business], and other foreign language correspondences. So maybe we can say ang english ng ‘Pilipino’ ay ‘Filipino’… that simple. just sharing.

        • August 27, 2011 at 7:56 pm

          Hindi. Opisyal na pinalitan ang Pilipino sa moderno nitong baybay na Filipino. Maling kaisipan ang paggamit ng dalawang magkaibang baybay sa parehas na konteksto. Hindi ito ginawa upang sabihin lamang na “ang English ng Pilipino ay Filipino. FYI, hindi na po tayo namumuhay sa panahon ng Abakada. Hindi naman siguro masama kung aalamin natin ito bilang isang mamamayang Pilipino. (Pilipino = tao, Filipino = wika)

      • August 29, 2011 at 1:00 am

        it is okay, friend. Filipino, being a dynamic language like all other lingua francas, is now accepted in both P and F to denote either the people or the language. You can ask the experts, the dictionary and the law isn’t always up to date.

      • Paz de Leon
        September 14, 2011 at 7:16 pm

        Base sa aking pagkakatandaan,ang abakada ng Pilipino ay walang letrang F,not unless meron na ngayon.Kasi noong panahon na pinag aaralan sa paaralan eto ang mga letra ng ating abakada.A.B.K.D,E,G,H,I,L,M,N,NG,O,P,R,S,T,U.W,Y,na kung bibigkasin ay a,ba,ka,da,e,ga,ha,i,la,ma,na,nga,o,pa,ra,sa,ta,u,wa,ya.

        Mabuhay ang Pilipino.

        • Paz de Leon
          September 14, 2011 at 7:22 pm

          Sorry,di na pala tayo nabubuhay sa panahong tinutukoy ko sa itaas,wala na pala ang abakada ngayon.Thanks for the information Nicolai.

  10. jake
    August 26, 2011 at 4:38 pm

    It happens only to developing countries, where the quality of English is associated with educated. The association has statistical basis, because a big percentage of the educated and “learned” truly speak the language very well. However how many of us want to disagree with this notion, that’s the truth. Especially in the corporate world, English has always been the official business language.

    As a personal opinion, I really like poetry done in pure Tagalog.

  11. August 26, 2011 at 4:39 pm

    J.M. :

    Just an observation: when Filipinos talk to foreign expats, they try their best to mimic the accents. The tone of voice is softer and refined, as if one were in a beauty pagent’s q and a portion. And these people would be regarded as cultured, learned individuals.

    And when they do speak in Filipino, suddenly everything is reversed. Expletives shower left, right and center, tones are higher and banshee-like with more expletives for emphasis. From cultured and learned, the same person becomes another person entirely.

    What James wrote only made me ask – why does it seem that the Filipino language is reserved for informality?

    P.S

    I realize this reply is in English. I admit, that Filipino was never my best subject in school.

    it is actually very wise to mimic the accent of people you talk to. it just makes it easier for them to understand you.

    • August 26, 2011 at 7:33 pm

      When you go to cebu, do you mimic the cebuano accent to be understood as well? or to bacolod, the same? from what i observe, native filipino (mostly tagalogs) speakers mimic only to make fun of the regional accents, not to be understood. there’s this duality, and while it is true that there may be a few who indeed mimic the accent of foreigners to be better understood, most do not.

      • August 26, 2011 at 7:46 pm

        no, when in cebu, speaking in english is better than in filipino. more people in the provinces understand english better than filipino. in foreign countries, it’s wise to speak in broken english or as we describe it barok english for you to be understood in a place like hong kong for example on top of the accent that they have.

        • August 26, 2011 at 8:05 pm

          it begs the same question…and i will rephrase. when speaking english in the provinces, do you mimic their accent to be better understood? i doubt it. in foreign countries, as far as i have experienced, we adjust. but in the provinces, they adjust. and i observed this to be true for Filipinos only. when i talk to the chinese, they do not mimmic my accent.it is the same for indians, europeans, and americans i have spoken with. If this is true (and i might be making hasty generalizations here) that we are not proud of our english, how much more so of our Filipino language?

          • August 26, 2011 at 8:16 pm

            the mimic of accent was in reference to foreigners. no need to mimic the accent of cebuanos, they are not foreigners.

            my experience in travelling is abroad and in being numerous business meetings and conferences, including daily work is that it is easier to mimic the accents of the country i am in to communicate with them.

            • August 26, 2011 at 8:29 pm

              and why do we treat foreigners differently than our own (Cebuanos)? Why the duality? You will work your ass off copying the accent of a foreigner make it easier for him to understand you but not the Cebuano? that’s really skewed man.

              • August 26, 2011 at 8:32 pm

                because cebuanos are very familiar with other pinoy’s accents. its really that simple, no hidden alarmist dark reason.

            • LetMeInsultYouoveracupofCoffee
              August 27, 2011 at 11:08 am

              Lol so when you converse wit a person who has a thick australian accent or jamaican accent, do you mimic them also? How often do get punch kn the face for mimicking the accent the person you’re talking to?! I imagined an infuriated chinese business and you sitting down to talk over business. Whatta-load of horse crap!

          • jake
            August 26, 2011 at 9:09 pm

            Everyone tries to copy the accent wherever they are, be it filipinos, indians, chinese, etc. Filipinos are just better compared to many nationalities because we are familiar with American English since grade school. I have to say you have loose basis in saying we are not proud of our English.

    • Julian
      August 28, 2011 at 12:29 pm

      ang mga payong ganito ang dahilan kaya nagtatawanan ang mga Briton dahil halata nang peke ang accent, pinipilit pa rin. hindi nito pinapadali ang pakikipagusap, pre, sa totoo lang.

      saka sa palagay ko ginagawa mo lang yan sa mga accent na iniisip mong “cool”. anumang labas sa puntong BBC, Amerikano o kung talagang pa-cool ka, Jamaican tinatawanan mo.

  12. nik
    August 26, 2011 at 4:56 pm

    It’s not ‘Pilipino’, it’s “Filipino”. Pilipino is the Filipino (Tagalog) term used to identify the person from the Philippines while Filipino is the language.

  13. Allan Coral
    August 26, 2011 at 4:56 pm

    To Mr. Ray, Filipino is actually correct. In 1959 the official language was Pilipino based from Tagalog. It was later named Filipino in the 1973 constitution.

    • Robert
      August 27, 2011 at 12:46 pm

      I believe Pilipino is not based from Tagalog. Pilipino or Filipino refers to all native dialects or languages {Bicol i supposed is considered a language because it consists of more than 50[?] dialects} spoken by Filipinos. Tagalog is one of them. It just happens that all books for Pilipino subjects are written in Tagalog so the misconception.

      In the article of James, he just used Tagalog terms to because he’s a Tagalog.

  14. August 26, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    the first time i read the article, i knew instantly that it was written by an Atenean. i was right. if author was aiming for satire, sorry but it was a failed attempt. a few more paragraphs and he could have done better.

  15. August 26, 2011 at 5:20 pm

    pfff……!
    dis guy made my mind boggle.

  16. G
    August 26, 2011 at 5:50 pm

    James Soriano – reflects on how his parents raised him up (no good fruit could come from a bad tree) and shows the kind of education that you can get from Ateneo (with false accents). Wonder what next he will say about our color or our height or our names or whatever is Filipino – maybe he has a different color or height, most probably he smells different too.

    • August 26, 2011 at 5:54 pm

      that is just going overboard and has no basis at all. you also posted in english, let’s not forget that. the use of filipino and english in this country is a reality we all have accepted, soriano has no failing in any of that.

    • myjavellana
      August 26, 2011 at 9:04 pm

      It’s pretty foul to involve someone’s parents here. You’re free to critique, but do so in a respectful way.

    • sweet19
      August 27, 2011 at 9:57 pm

      Is he really a Filipino???

  17. j_chich
    August 26, 2011 at 6:47 pm

    while i don’t agree with mr. soriano’s last two sentences in the article and maybe some other sentences here and there, he has pointed out some blatant truths about the Filipino language. being a mother of an elementary student, the Filipino subject does seem to be quite a difficult subject for the students to grasp and comprehend. like what he said, it certainly is a chore for them to study Filipino. so instead of criticizing or pointing fingers at mr. soriano for his opinion on this matter, maybe we should thank him for laying these realities down and have the department of education or even the educational institutions themselves, to re-evaluate the Filipino curriculum in schools. maybe it’s high time we differ the approach in teaching Filipino to make it better understood, better learned, and better used by the Filipino population.

    • Robert
      August 27, 2011 at 1:07 pm

      Agree, if you read the article in its entirety, ok naman except the last 2 pars. but still i think there is some misinterpretations among us readers. Well, that’s writing is all about. we might be able to read between the lines but may still fail to get the exact point if not the sentiments. At the end, he made his article successful because it gathered all of us to read it, reflect, criticize and above all know him… his name! effective di ba?

  18. August 26, 2011 at 7:25 pm

    nohablaingles :
    “the soriano article is reality. what you read there and how pinoys use languages, english and pilipino in aprticular[sic] is all true.” – what reality to do you live in? a reality where you only speak our lingua franca to manongs, tinderas, katulongs and drivers to “make sundo” you? wow. that is one comfortable, convenient, and skewed reality you live in. it’s a reality for you and your privileged friends, not everybody.
    “that is also true for most pinoys who go through schooling in private schools in the country.”- and how many pinoys go schooling in private schools for his article to generalize that Filipino is not the language of the “learned”?
    “we also find it interesting, in fact ironic that almost all of those who were attacking and disagreeing with soriano were tweeting in english and not in pilipino.” – it’s not ironic. he might not get the message if it weren’t in his mother tongue.
    “we think the adverse reactions soriano has been getting is being caused by the fact that truth hurts.” – the elitist truth does hurt because it undermines the manongs, the tinderas, the katulongs, the drivers, and other Filipinos who use their native tongue as a language.
    “readers just can’t accept the fact that even in lanaguage, there is a divide in philippine society.” – no. they just can’t accept that there’s someone in the privileged side of this divide of which you speak of that is as ignorant and self-serving enough to come up with such an article that is a disservice to a language his countrymen use. (eh kung ganyan ang tingin niya sa tagalog, pano pa kaya sa mga katutubong wika?)
    “we know of the divide in wealth, opportunities, jobs, justice and education in philippine society where the rich are able to get the best and the mostest while the poor make do with meager offerings. the truth hurts to know that that also exists in language.” – that is true. Soriano proved it. With apologists like you and Soriano, you’re not making it easier.
    mostest. wtf.

    i couldn’t agree more. it is not so much on what was said, but on how it was said really. his conclusions were drawn from the very small, isolated world he lives in.

    • August 26, 2011 at 7:47 pm

      that is what an opinion or editorial article is all about – it is based on the opinion of the individual.

      • August 26, 2011 at 8:24 pm

        indeed! :) what he said is debatable, those were only opinions after all. he is a rich kid, it is not his fault. he in fact acknowledged “the outside world”, that his ‘inner world’ was different. i just think that it would serve him (and his opinions) well if he had known a little more of the “outside world” he refers to. a ‘learned’ person would know better don’t you think? though i admit that i found parts of the article funny, it did sound offensive for the most part and i felt it unbecoming a ‘learned’ person that he was. :)

        • August 26, 2011 at 8:31 pm

          i do not understand why people will find offense when an article simply describes the facts and the reality. fact and reality : there is an inequitable distribution of wealth in the country which leads to inequitable opportunities in education which leads to an unequal language skills.

          unless we accept and understand those realities, we cannot begin to solve the base problem of inequitable distribution of wealth.

          • August 27, 2011 at 4:42 pm

            re: wawam

            teka… so ano ba talaga para sa iyo tong article? “that is what an opinion or editorial article is all about – it is based on the opinion of the individual,” or “an article simply describes the facts and the reality,”? sabi mo fact and reality an inequitable distribution of wealth at fact din para sayo na the language of the streets is Filipino (Tagalog). eh ano ang opinyon, ngarud? para lang malinaw na kinaklaro ko sa yo na hindi maaaring katotohanan (truth) ang Filipino (Tagalog) ay “language of the streets”. pero kung sinasabi mo na opinyon yan, eh di sige. that’s your opinion. i’ll just leave you with another article to read to reflect upon it.

        • August 27, 2011 at 4:27 pm

          it’s clear that it’s opinion. that’s true. he presented no academic references or claims to back it up. in that case, as a reader, i think his opinion is lacking in what we can call “muscle”. yes, it’s not his fault he grew up with a colonial educational system. it’s sad that he supports it, though not blatantly. what’s upsetting though is how he seems to rub his privileged upbringing into the readers’ faces (read: make utos the katulong, text manong to make sundo)… almost like buying a porsche when fares and gas prices go up. sure you can do it, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t in bad taste.

      • Jeproks
        August 27, 2011 at 2:15 am

        … and since the opinion is published to a wide audience, it will be subject to analysis and scrutiny. You on the other hand are so intent on contradicting anything that has any semblance of a disagreement with the article. If you really need to do that, provide your opinion on the whole comment and not just on specific lines that you tend to use out of context.

      • August 27, 2011 at 8:32 pm

        while it is true that editorial articles are based on opinion, you must not forget that Soriano had just made an opinion on the Filipino language. His opinion just insulted the entire nation — including himself if he is still one.

  19. Lunanah
    August 26, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    Wala naman masama sa sinabi niya inexplain lang nmn niya kung paano natin mga Filipino ginagamit ang salitang Tagalog. Na mas ginagamit natin ang saling Ingles kesa sa sarili nating wika.

    • Jeproks
      August 26, 2011 at 11:15 pm

      ang problema, hindi lang naman yan ang sinabi nya eh… sabi rin nya, na yung Filipino eh hindi salita ng mga may pinag-aralan… so bale ikaw, ako, mga walang pinag-aralan… agree?

      • chaka
        October 4, 2011 at 3:59 pm

        jeproks
        -dahil sa last word mo na ‘agree?’ which is an english word (the language of the learned) may PINAG-ARALAN ka..
        -tama nmn ang cnabi ni mr. Soriano sa article nya. kc ang English kht sa pre-school tinuturo na.so pag marunong ka mg-english my pinag-aralan ka.while if Filipino gamit mo d mo malaman kng my pnag-aralan ba o wala kc ang Filipino kht walang subject na Filipino naiintindihan ntn un d nid pag-aralan pra magets.

  20. pie
    August 26, 2011 at 8:04 pm

    Matthew :
    Anyway, there is no need to violently react to this article–only a stupid, uneducated, masa Filipino who has cheap access to the Internet would actually do that.

    so, because you are NOT violently reacting to the article, you are NOT “a stupid, uneducated, masa Filipino who has cheap access to the Internet”? This is the same argument that got people reacting tot he original article, to resort to name calling and degrading your fellow Filipino, just because you think you are better than them….because you have more expensive access to the internet.

    • August 29, 2011 at 1:09 am

      I think, in all cases, we should not react with “name calling” and other derogatory terms when reacting to posts and threads. That’d be a civilized way of dealing with other netizens. It’d be enough to point out their errors here and there but never on the person or his personal life. James made a mistake just as Christopher did (tama ba?).

      It’s interesting enough that we Filipino’s could actually feel hurt when our language is stepped on. So… pagyamanin na lang natin ang wika natin nang mabago natin ang sistema.

  21. August 26, 2011 at 8:04 pm

    james soriano: you are really good in language, but are you technically good???? even you are good in debate, are you good in mathematics and science? And your looks???? i might describe you as POGI, because pogi is for ASO!

  22. August 26, 2011 at 8:07 pm

    pie :

    Matthew :
    Anyway, there is no need to violently react to this article–only a stupid, uneducated, masa Filipino who has cheap access to the Internet would actually do that.

    so, because you are NOT violently reacting to the article, you are NOT “a stupid, uneducated, masa Filipino who has cheap access to the Internet”? This is the same argument that got people reacting tot he original article, to resort to name calling and degrading your fellow Filipino, just because you think you are better than them….because you have more expensive access to the internet.

    “to resort to name calling and degrading your fellow Filipino, just because you think you are better than them” – where is that in soriano’s article?

    • pie
      August 26, 2011 at 8:17 pm

      the name calling was not in Soriano’s article, it was in Matthew’s post as quoted, but the degrading was, Filipno being the language of the streets and the working class- tinderas, katulong, manong driver, “a society of rotten beef and stinking fish”. Wawam…I respect your motivation to defend the article, but really? To challenge every reply that does not agree with it? There are legitimate points in Soriano’s article, I agree, but again, no need to degrade not only the language but the people and the country as well.

      • August 26, 2011 at 8:24 pm

        “but the degrading was, Filipno being the language of the streets and the working class- tinderas, katulong, manong driver” — how is that degrading? that is a benign description of the reality that they speak mostly filipino. there is no value judgement in that, just a statement of observation.

        • August 29, 2011 at 1:17 am

          I was hurt that he called our society “a society of rotting meat and stinking fish”. Wow, sounds like he called us all hypocrites. And while I do love my mother tongue (Filipino), it doesn’t harm to speak or argue in English. But to call my countrymen hypocrites might just as well be an acceptable “statement of observation” by yours truly

  23. August 26, 2011 at 8:10 pm

    anj :

    It is true that a lot of educated Filipinos are really good in English. It is also true that English is a very critical tool in order to compete internationally in the corporate world or the academe. There is nothing wrong about being great in English. I am not a Filipino purist – as you pointed out, here I am writing this in English.
    What I find objectionable about Mr. Soriano’s article is the implication that Filipino is the language of the working class. “Working class” is even putting it nicely, in his article, he makes them clearly second class citizens. Filipino is my mother tongue, and as an OFW, this gives me great comfort and kinship with my fellowmen here in a foreign land. While I use English at work and in daily life, that does not take away the value of Filipino in any way. I just don’t see the point of belittling Filipino just to make the point that English is a very important and useful language to master.

    as an OFW, wasn’t your good command of english one of the key reasons you were accepted in your job? the answer is probably yes, it is. and that is one of the points raised in the soriano article – that english for filipinos is the language of opportunities.

  24. JP
    August 26, 2011 at 8:36 pm

    pasintabi po, ngunit ano po ang inyong palagay sa latha ni ginoong soriano noong taong 2008?

    (http://james.soriano-ph.com/2008/12/filipino-as-a-second-language/)

    • August 27, 2011 at 4:50 pm

      ay nako! i was giving JS benefit of the doubt that his article was just a poorly written satire. seryoso pala siya.

    • August 28, 2011 at 2:06 am

      Yes. Well written and very true. this 2008 article only reflects the sad reality of the state of our language. It may hurt and painfully so. But our emotions can not deny the truth. Well, we are a young nation. Our language, as our culture, is a work in progress. I would want to make use of JS’s article to think of other ways for better use of the Filipino language.

  25. gamo
    August 26, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    Naaawa ako sa kaniya kasi hindi niya na-enjoy ang Filipino nung kabataan pa lang niya. Maraming kayamanan ang ating kultura na accessible lamang kung marunong kang mag-Filipino.

  26. August 26, 2011 at 9:09 pm

    It only shows the reality of Filipinos being racist including the author.

    • August 26, 2011 at 9:16 pm

      how is the author racist?

  27. Usisera
    August 26, 2011 at 9:18 pm

    The really upsetting thing about Mr. Soriano’s piece isn’t that he dares to question the state of the national language — it’s that he implies he’s better than the rest of us because of his imagined fluency. This piece is nothing more than a look-at-me-I-speak-perfect-English homage to himself. He can stuff his “connections” where the sun doesn’t shine.

    (Yes, I jotted this down in English. You know, just in case Mr. Soriano’s drops by your blog. I don’t want him to miss a thing. If he has the right to say his piece, then so do we “hurt” netizens.)

  28. fred
    August 26, 2011 at 9:36 pm

    what’s really wrong is the way he wrote the article. he can make his point without having to make filipino sound bad.

    (may mali sa pamamaraan ng kanyang pagsulat ng artikulo. pwede naman niyang ipahayag ang kanyang opinyon nang di sinisiraan ang wikang filipino.)

    and why schools use english? textbooks are in english. translate to filipino? well, it’s not that easy to translate. filipinos should make textbooks? good point, i don’t know if there are a lot of them, but i’m pretty sure they want their books to be internationally available, hence, english.

  29. try_reading_it_again_then_tell_me_he_said_nothing_wrong
    August 26, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    i speak in English as often as i can so i’ll be better at it. i write better in English than in Filipino because my job depends on it. i exerted more effort in studying English at school than in Filipino because my future depended on it. he’s right, we do give importance to English because we live in a society where such fluency in the language entitles you to a better future.

    it’s so good of you mr. blogger to defend these points of soriano. it is reality after all.

    so i guess that’s a good enough reason for us to classify our native tongue as the language of the unlearned, of the streets filled with rotten beef and stinking fish (oh i’m not taking that literally btw, i do get the metaphor). maybe we can just forget Filipino altogether and teach our children English because it’ll give them a better future. why waste their valuable time and effort in studying a language that they’ll just need to talk to their less privileged relatives in the province, or to the manongs and yayas. after all, Filipino is not the language of the learned.

    come to think of it, it was so stupid of Rizal to write Noli and El Fili in Spanish, stupider are those who translated them in Filipino and forced students to read them.

    Buwan ng Wika? what a stupid holiday. stupider are those who drove away the Spaniards and asked independence from the Americans just so we can use a language that’ll serve us no practical purpose at all.

    – – – – – – – – – – –

    Filipinos didn’t react the way they did because we’re too sensitive of the truth or of reality. We’re not that ignorant, you know. As a Filipino, I got pissed off because he belittled something that’s a part of my culture, stereotyped those who use it, and, most of all, because he did so while sitting on his pedestal so high like he’s so much better than his fellow Filipinos just because English is his mother language.

    By posting this article on a national publication, not only did he dig his own grave, but also those on the same social class as he is, his fellow Ateneans, and every Filipino who use English more often than Filipino but never once said a bad thing about the language.

  30. August 26, 2011 at 9:55 pm

    try_reading_it_again_then_tell_me_he_said_nothing_wrong :

    i speak in English as often as i can so i’ll be better at it. i write better in English than in Filipino because my job depends on it. i exerted more effort in studying English at school than in Filipino because my future depended on it. he’s right, we do give importance to English because we live in a society where such fluency in the language entitles you to a better future.

    your experience confirms what soriano said:

    (filipino…) “It is neither the language of the classroom and the laboratory, nor the language of the boardroom, the court room, or the operating room. It is not the language of privilege.”

    • try_reading_it_again_then_tell_me_he_said_nothing_wrong
      August 26, 2011 at 10:11 pm

      wow. that’ll be my only reply. WOW.

      this’ll be my last reply to this site. now i understand your way of thinking.

      maybe i should change my guest name to “try_reading_my_post_again_and_this_time_do_try_to_get_my_point”

      have an awesome evening!

      • August 26, 2011 at 10:13 pm

        again, sometimes i think pinoys refuse and can’t acceptt reality.

        • August 26, 2011 at 11:04 pm

          We cannot always use truth and reality as a legitimate reason to be a jerk.

          • August 26, 2011 at 11:06 pm

            what makes the author a jerk? for telling the truth?

            • August 26, 2011 at 11:14 pm

              What makes you say that it is the truth? It may be a version of reality but not necessarily something that is true.

              • August 26, 2011 at 11:16 pm

                we live the situation soriano describes in his article.

                • August 26, 2011 at 11:27 pm

                  “We?” What makes you say that the situation this Mr. Soriano describes is the situation that “we” live in? The pronoun “we” is too much of an inclusive word for this comment.

                  • August 26, 2011 at 11:40 pm

                    have you ever talked in english to jeepney drivers? has any jeepney driver talked to you in english?

                    have you ever written an office memo in filipino? have you ever received an office memo in filipino?

                    have you answered job interview questions in filipino? have you been interviewed for a job where filipino is used?

                    have you ever received a medical diagnosis in filipino?

                    have you ever written a thesis for school in filipino? have you ever read an a science book in filipino?

                    why are you posting here in english?

                    answer all those questions, please.

                    • August 27, 2011 at 10:31 am

                      opo, try ko po isang beses,,,, hehehe,,, ngumiti po ang Boss ko at ang nasabi nia, nangangampanya ka ba? hehehe lahat po kami sa opisina nagtawanan kasi po yong Boss ko palagi seryoso at di mo makita ngumingiti….its a relief kasi di sia nagalit and to our surprise he approved the request as per what written sa letter…

                      hahaha,,,tawa nga ako ngaun kasi naalala ko,,, ginamit po kasi na mga salita ang lalalim sabi pa nga ng kasama ko maiintindihan nia kaya itoh? hehehe kasi alam namin nag aral sia sa Amerika at nag trabaho dun.. he is a Pilipino umuwi sia dito para dito tumira at mag business….

                      nakalimutan ni Soriano ilagay sa Article ni Mr. Soriano sa article nia at tama bang i correct? Filipino is Street Languange pero ang ating Presidente, Senator, Congressman, Mayor, at mga Kagawads pag panahon ng election nangangampanya sa taong bayan ang salitang ginagamit ay Filipino,,, bakit pag nasa Senado at Congresso hehehe English ang gamit?

                    • lex
                      September 25, 2011 at 8:19 pm

                      try mu kumuha ng course sa UP. yung mga tipong polsci… para yung curriculum mu sa halip communication eh… komunikasyon… at ang thesis mo ay pwede mo isulat sa Filipino. Try mu lang para makita mo kung anu ung language of the learned… :p

        • Jeproks
          August 26, 2011 at 11:06 pm

          I feel you try_reading_it_again_then_tell_me_he_said_nothing_wrong… Mr. Wawam simply pulls specific lines from people’s comments to reiterate some points in Soriano’s article but without the whole context. What reality are you talking about Wawam? That Filipino is not the language of the learned? That is NOT reality and if you believe that then you probably live with Soriano is his little world where there are only 2 kinds of people he interacts with- the learned and the katulongs.

          • August 26, 2011 at 11:15 pm

            this is what is in the article:

            this is english:

            In school I learned to think in English. We used English to learn about numbers, equations and variables. With it we learned about observation and inference, the moon and the stars, monsoons and photosynthesis. With it we learned about shapes and colors, about meter and rhythm. I learned about God in English, and I prayed to Him in English.

            filipino is :

            Filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom. It was the language of the streets: i

            Only recently have I begun to grasp Filipino as the language of identity: the language of emotion, experience, and even of learning. And with this comes the realization that I do, in fact, smell worse than a malansang isda. My own language is foreign to me: I speak, think, read and write primarily in English.

            frilipino is not:

            It is neither the language of the classroom and the laboratory, nor the language of the boardroom, the court room, or the operating room. It is not the language of privilege. I may be disconnected from my being Filipino, but with a tongue of privilege I will always have my connections.

            and from my view – there is

            we know of the divide in wealth, opportunities, jobs, justice and education in philippine society where the rich are able to get the best and the mostest (intended) while the poor make do with meager offerings. the truth hurts to know that that also exists in language.

            with inequitable distribution of wealth comes inequitable opportunities in education that results to inequitable distribution of language skills and ends up in inequitable distribution of job opportunities which goes back to inequitable distribution of wealth.

            the divide, a wide one between the poor and the rich is one of the most enduring problems in philippine society. it is not only an issue of poverty, it is an issue of inequitable distribution of wealth where a very small portion of the population control a very large portion of the wealth of the country while a very large population are poor dividing among themselves a very meager portion of the wealth of the country.

            • Jeproks
              August 27, 2011 at 2:52 am

              You left out this part: “It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.” You insist that the article speaks of reality and the truth… How much truth is in the quoted sentence above? And how much truth is in your statement that “The rich speak in English while the poor speak in Filipino”. Do you have statistics to prove that? Actually, why don’t we backtrack a bit and define what “rich” is… Are we talking of hundred thousands or millions in family money? Or are we talking of the sosyals riding the flashy car with manong driver in uniform? Contrary to your or Soriano’s belief, there are educated Filipinos who speak very good English, hold high-paying jobs as professionals but use Filipino as their primary language- meaning they use Filipino to communicate not only with the fishball vendor, the manong guard and the mayordoma of the mansion, but also with their parents (both also educated and are professionals who contribute to society), brothers and sisters, friends and other educated people who happen to like speaking in Filipino. What do you make of this people? In what reality can people who can speak perfect English when they want or need to to but choose to speak Filipino exist and be considered as educated/learned individuals? Definitely not in your nor Soriano’s reality.

              Nice spin on the unequal distribution of wealth but I don’t think Soriano’s article is about that. Suggesting that Soriano was actually trying to deliver that message is giving him too much credit. Nice try, but that won’t save the article.

              • chaka
                October 4, 2011 at 4:10 pm

                “there are educated Filipinos who speak very good English, hold high-paying jobs as professionals but use Filipino as their primary language”
                -wake-up! mas madami pa rin gumagamit ng ENGLISH!sad but its d truth! dont deny it 2 urself!

  31. KahitMahihirapPangarapAngDilaNya
    August 26, 2011 at 9:59 pm

    Truth hurts, but i don’t see anything wrong with what he wrote. Masakit man pero tama ang mga punto niya.

  32. Kher
    August 26, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    It might be the truth and as you said, “truth hurts.” But that’s not the point. If the article was meant to be an eye-opener for us Filipinos (about the divide in society because of the language one uses), then the tone of his writing was not appropriate for that purpose.

    Ingles man o Filipino, walang pinagkaiba, basta’t hindi pagmamayabang ang dahilan ng paggamit. Eh sa artik na ‘to, parang ang labas ay nagyayabang lang siya.

    • August 26, 2011 at 11:05 pm

      the content is real.

      • uh-huh
        August 27, 2011 at 2:33 am

        wawam=james soriano

      • hindi ako ikaw!
        September 6, 2011 at 3:41 am

        wawam burgis ka rin noh?

  33. August 26, 2011 at 10:05 pm

    sometimes i think pinoys are just having a hard time accepting and admitting to the unpleasant truths about our lives and society. what makes that even more confusing is those who have been attacking and disagreeing with soriano are actually posting in english.

    there is a huge disconnect there.

  34. reviewer22
    August 26, 2011 at 10:06 pm

    James Soriano is believed to be a senior in some school in katipunan and yet he knows how the “real world” works! He has connections because he speaks english (if you consider facebook friends and your college barkadas as connections). I speak to my superiors and to my subordinates in Filipino. Meetings are much better conducted in Filipino. The president speaks Filipino to his cabinet members. Even Chinese locals speak Filipino to conduct their business to Filipinos. I thank the major TV stations for deciding to report news in Filipino. I consider myself a “learned” individual yet speaking in Filipino gets the job done in all levels whether your in management, middle management, or the guy in his small cubicle.

    “as an OFW, wasn’t your good command of english one of the key reasons you were accepted in your job? the answer is probably yes, it is. and that is one of the points raised in the soriano article – that english for filipinos is the language of opportunities.”–what you don’t know is that your foreign employer has the same sentiments as James: he has to speak in english (not his native tongue) to order (make utos) to his employee. In the real world, your employer would have loved that you speak his national language!

    Eh bakit ka nag reply sa ingles? ang problema kasi si james nagsulat ng ingles kaya ang na basa nang buong mundo ay na may mga Pilipino na handa talikuran ang kinagisnan na kultura para lang sa pribilehiyo. Na mas gugustuhin pa natin na tangkilikin ang banyagang wika bago ang sariling atin. Na handa siya mag amoy malansang isda dahil sa kakarampot na paghahalaga niya ng Filipino basta lang tanggapin siya ng mga “connections” niya dahil sa pagsalita niya ng ingles. Bahala siya. Yan ang nakagisnan niya. Iyan ang minulat sa kanya. Kahit pilit ipahalaga ng pinapasukan niyang unibersidad ang Filipino. Pero sa huli, huwag natin pagkait ang kagustuhan niya. Huwag natin ipagkait ang hangad niyang makasama ang “connections” niya. Huwag natin itanggal ang pribilehiyo na pagiging “learned” niya dahil ayaw niya mag FIlipino. Hindi naman siya nananakit. Baka isa pa nga siyang modelong mamamayan sa kanyang barangay at sumusunod sa batas. In short, bawal magbasag ng trip. :))

  35. Usi_boy
    August 26, 2011 at 10:07 pm

    ahh edi kapag may german na magaling mag english, language of the street nia ung pagsasalita ng german? hndi ko malaman kung gusto nia bang maliitin ung wikang Filipino o gusto niang ipagmayabang na english ung kinalakihan niyang wika.

  36. August 26, 2011 at 10:09 pm

    I think that what James Soriano wrote is an eye opener for all of us Pinoys. It is the truth of what is happening here in the country. We can criticize him for all he cares but that won’t really address the core of the issue which is that the Filipino language has been linked with so many informal and less than glorious image. Why then would the most fluent English speaking applicants be the ones accepted to high paying job posts? Why then would corporate presentations, even class presentations, be delivered in English? Why then would a lot of Filipinos laugh at fellowmen who speak broken English (i.e. Erap and Melanie Marquez)? It’s because we have attached such a high premium value on English and such a low value on Filipino. We cannot really blame James. He was merely saying his reasons for choosing a language he grew up with and learned to love all because the society around him gave him no reason to love his own mother tongue. This is reality. And it really hurts. A lot.

    I also wrote a piece on the matter and since the original MB article is down, I’ll have to link here for the full article. :)

  37. rthur
    August 26, 2011 at 10:14 pm

    Yaman naman po ng Pinas ang dalawang wika bilang opisyal na gamit natin sa usapan. Dati opisyal din nating wika ang Espanyol; at nuon tulad tayo sa bansa ng mga Swiso kung saan tatlo ang wikang opisyal: italiano, aleman at pranses. Sa palagay ko ang pagkakamali ay doon sa iniisip na komo nakararaming nagsasalita ng Filipino ay masa mas mababa iyon at hiranging “mother tongue” o “educated” ang ingles. Walang wikang nakakababa o nakatataas sa iba. May mga pagtitipong akademiko at pangsining na Filipino ang salitaan. Sa palagay ko, kulang edukasyon ng mga hindi nakakasama sa gayong mga okasyon.

  38. sunny c
    August 26, 2011 at 11:07 pm

    walang masama sa sinulat ni james ‘mukhang aeta’ soriano. sana doon na lang sa blog niya. ngayon, kung gusto mo rin sumikat sa pag defend sa kanya, i can easily link your blog to my fb account. sisikat ka din.

  39. Seeker
    August 26, 2011 at 11:44 pm

    Napakadami naman nagtatangol dito kay Soriano at puro mga nagsasalita rin ng Ingles. Sabagay, ang may-akda ay ipinagtatanggol rin naman si Soriano. Kay daming sinasabi tulad ng hindi naiintindihan o tama naman siya. Oo nga naman, tama nga naman siya. Ang “Filipino” ay para lamang sa mga katulong o tindera. In short and in Soriano’s world “poor”. Kinakausap ko ang nanay ko sa tagalog siguro kasi katulong siya. Kinakausap ko sa tagalog ang mga kaibigan ko kasi mga tindera sila. Ang ingles ay para sa mga mayayaman o matatalino. In short and in Soriano’s world “learned”. Ano nga ba ang batayan para masabing “learned” ka? Siguro nga ingles ang ginagamit natin sa laboratoryo o sa pag-aaral ng matematika pero sapat na ba iyon para sabihing “learned” ka? Hindi ba’t sa Amerika naman, mahirap man o mayaman, bobo o matalino ay ingles ang salita? May punto nga naman si Soriano, sa Ingles masmadaming trabaho ang magbubukas pero hindi naman ibig sabihin noon ay pangmahirap lang ito. Kay daming bansa na mayayaman pero mga hindi bihasa sa Ingles. Mga kababayan ko na sinasabing “the truth hurts” anong parte ba sa sinulat ni Soriano ang truth? Ang “learned” ba o ang “society of rotten beef and stinking fish”? Well, guess what, you’re part of the society of stinking fish. If that’s what this “the truth hurts” is all about then that really hurts, especially for the LIKES of Mr. Soriano. And if “Filipino” was hard to grasp for him, I mean come on, Filipino? Then who’s not “learned” now? The other truth to be considered: his mind, including the others’, was infected by the so-called “colonial mentality”. Now that’s the truth that hurts. And to say that what Soriano was trying to point was all about bigger opportunities, do you even read or are you just making excuses for your “baluktot na dila”? Filipinos, even those who can’t understand English, are not bobo, you know? As someone said on some forum: “kay haba-haba ng sinabi pero ang gusto lang naman sabihin ay pangbobo at pangmahirap lang ang Filipino. Sad to say but I don’t think Soriano was just simply voicing out his opinions nor telling us his childhood in English, he knew this will garner more attention. Cheeky bastard got what he was aiming for. I agree that there’s no need for violent reactions, no need to repeat another Mideo. So this is just me sharing my, err, 2 cents, wait, make that 50 cents.

    • micca
      August 27, 2011 at 12:31 am

      Panalo ang comment na to! Baka katulong din ang buong pamilya ko… hahaha

    • stic
      August 27, 2011 at 2:00 pm

      can i get an AMEN!

    • August 28, 2011 at 1:19 am

      galing mo kuya… \m/

  40. Lei
    August 26, 2011 at 11:46 pm

    Hmmm,ang sabi ni James Soriano “Filipino is not the language of learning.” True naman. Pano lahat nga ng subjects were taught in English, so we learned to learn in English. In college, I was surprised to realize, when tasked to write a Filipino literary piece, that I had a hard time doing so. In fact, to date, I haven’t written a single decent Filipino literary piece. English has become my natural writing language. Lest people say OA ako, iba po kasi ‘pag literature na. It’s not like your usual essay wherein you try to use the more functional words. Kung yun lang, kaya namang sumulat in Filipino. But to write a Filipino literary piece one had to choose the best pieces in Filipino language and this is where the problem starts. Somehow, the years of colonization and now, modernization took that away from us. Our school system had succesfully diverted our hearts from our noble and superior native tongue and what was left for us to speak is the colloquial Filipino language. Yung magkaintindihan lang. For me, Filipino is a superior language, kaya nga mahirap i-express minsan ang sarili in this language–because speaking it means confronting your soul, your past, your legacy and sadly we lost those roots a long time ago.

    • micca
      August 27, 2011 at 12:29 am

      Ate, yung ibig sabihin ng “Filipino is not the language of learning.” isipin mo mabuti ha. Damdamin mo. Namnanamin mo mabuti hanggang maintindihan mo para sa ingles malaman mo ang ibig sabihin ng read between the lines. Wag oo ng oo. Pasensya na, wala ako galit sayo… pero hindi talaga uubra ang “Filipino is not the language of learning.” Magisip.

      • Lei
        August 27, 2011 at 1:47 am

        Magkaiba nga siguro tayo ng intindi. I understand this “language of learning” as in mas naging effective sa’tin yung English as a medium of instruction (for which I again, blame the school/education system or even the constitution which allowed it) at hindi “language of the learned” which I noticed is how some of the commenters understood it. I agree with James Soriano on his observations pero ang challenge dito is to explain how it came to be: bakit lumabas na Ingles ang naging “language of privelege?” One reason is because only those who can afford good education can learn it. Syempre may exceptions. But it is, in most cases, a fact that good English skills like fashionable clothes, flashy cars, fair skin can be had by those who can afford it. Kung may dapat ipagpasalamat sa English language na ‘to na natutunan natin, it’s the “utility” of this skill dahil napadali tayong mag-adapt sa global community na gumagamit nito. Ang mali sa pag-adopt natin ng English, is it further divided this already torn nation. Sa wika na nga lang naramdaman pa natin ang gap ng may kaya sa wala. Hindi ko opinion na ang Filipino ay wika ng walang pinag-aralan and I suspect yun din ang sinasabi ng columnist. Observation ito ng common perception na tayo rin naman ang humubog. Kung sa una pa lang itinuring natin na ang English ay skill lang gaya ng pagluluto, pagsosolve ng math problems, etc. at hindi gauge para ituring kang sosyal, elite o may pinag-aralan di sana hindi ito nagiging source ng debate. Language per se is not a gauge of wisdom, class or nationalism.

        • echos
          August 27, 2011 at 3:33 am

          Hindi niya pwedeng sabihin na hindi pwedeng gamitin ang Filipino sa pagtuturo. Try kaya niyang pag-aaralan ang pilosopiya ng tao in Filipino? O Teolohiya? Hahaha. Nakakainis itong si Soriano. To think sa Ateneo nag-(a)aral. Mas mahirap mag-aral ng isang kurso kung saan mag-iisip ka sa sariling wika. Nako, baka kotongin ka ni Fr. Ferriols. Hahaha

  41. Pete
    August 26, 2011 at 11:54 pm

    Truth hurts ka jan. Your assumption is full of fallacies, this is the truth for elitist but not for the Filipino masses. Di man lang nahiya sa balat, sa Manila Bulletin pa.

    Basta ako, papalakihin ko ang anak ko ng marunong mag-Filipino. Matalino ang magiging anak ko, matutunan niya ang Ingles pagkatapos.

    • August 27, 2011 at 3:57 pm

      “Truth hurts ka jan. Your assumption is full of fallacies, this is the truth for elitist but not for the Filipino masses.” – ITO KASI YUN EH. Ito yung dahilan kung bakit may mga nagigimbal sa article ni Soriano. Hindi kasi hindi katanggap-tanggap ang inequality kaya may mga naiinis. May mga naiinis kasi ang elitista lang na parang balewala lang ang masang Pilipino (you know, yung mga nasa probinsya rin. hindi lang yung taga-Maynila).

  42. reviewer22
    August 26, 2011 at 11:58 pm

    To be fair to Mr. Soriano, no one should be ridiculed for accepting another language over the national language. In fact, we must see his article as a cry for help. Unless he chooses to be “self-exiled” to an english speaking country, he will continually labor to speak in Filipino to the tinderas, manongs, katulongs, and kamag anaks. He will find difficulty in getting work where most of the top applicants are fluent in english and in Filipino. When he does get a job, it would be difficult to converse with co-workers by the water cooler about the national past times: telanovelas and local showbiz. He would not be able to defend himself from average man on the street especially traffic law enforcers. Can’t we see that even if he embraced english wholeheartedly, he will also be seen as a foreigner by his Filipino speaking countrymen? Wouldn’t one feel guilty if one of his countryman is a stranger to his nation. Wouldn’t he get lost for not understanding the right directions? So please before we judge him, let us be reminded that he is a man still searching for his identity as a Filipino and that the inability to speak the language is a manifestation of deeper issues that need resolution. :)

    • Jeproks
      August 27, 2011 at 2:05 am

      Very touching, but I wouldn’t consider his article as a cry for help. Didn’t he feel empowered because he has English as his mother language?

      • sweet19
        August 27, 2011 at 7:47 pm

        masaya pa nga syang mas magaling sya sa Ingles kesa sa pag-tatagalog eh! sana lang hindi nya msyadong minaliit ang pagsasalita ng tagalog dito sa bansang PILIPINAS kahit na alam ng karamihan eh maruning din tayo ng Ingles. sa katotohanang na sya ay lumakin sa wikang Ingles, sa dami ng tao sa Pilipinas na nakapag aral sa magagandang eskwelahan na ang turo din ay may Ingles, bakit hindi naman nila naisip na pang-kalye and wikang tagalog? o ang pinu-punto ba nya eh kung ang kausap mo ay mga katulong, drayber o tindera dun lang ba dapat mag-tagalog? insulto naman yun! parang sinabi nya na rin na pang mababang klase lang ng tao and tagalog.

    • August 29, 2011 at 1:32 am

      true. it didn’t help though that he called our society “rotting beef and stinking fish”. But I do agree, dapat nga nating pagyamanin ang wikang Filipino, I’m sure he did say that somewhere in his article… have to find it though kasi satire daw yung article.

  43. Gwen
    August 27, 2011 at 12:01 am

    James obviously lives in his own protected little bubble. A wise man acknowledges that the more he knows, the more he does not know. He may be well-educated, but he lacks the higher learning to appreciate the relevance and beauty of the language, which use he has only reserved to the “outside world”. He should first try to expand his view of his own little world and garner understanding beyond it. For now, he just sounds like a schoolboy with an identity crisis.

    And for the writer of this blog, please expect the variety of opinions. There is already no need to contradict others as you have already expressed your own.

  44. micca
    August 27, 2011 at 12:23 am

    kung tiitignan nyo ang sinulat nya, wala sanang problema. Maayos ang pagkakasulat, may direksyon, may kaayusan, at konektado ang mga ideya. Ang problema yung punto nya sa huli, yung tinutukoy ng artikulo nya. Kung paano nya maliitin ang wikang Pilipino bilang wika ng mababang tao na hindi nya kailanman maiintindihan ang nararamdaman dahil nakakataas sya sa buhay? Anong klase pang hahasa ang ginawa nya sa sarili nya upang ni minsan ay di niya kwestyunin ang takbo ng isip nya ukol sa Filipino?

    Para sa manunulat ng blog na ito.. hindi po lahat ng Pilipino ay nakakapag internet. Kaya wag nyong isipin na ang lahat ng nagkukumento ay tamang representasyon ng lahat ng Pilipino. Sa usapan ng statistics, hindi sasapat ang bilang ng nagkomento.

    Isa pa, mahirap ba na isipin na hindi lahat ng tinatawag na freedom of expression ay dapat? Bagong panahon na ngayon, dapat ang Pilipino lumalaban. Anong gusto mo? tanggapin na lang ng lahat ng tao na yun ang katotohanan? Hindi ba’t hindi naman lahat tayo ay nakakaugnay sa naranasan nya.

    Nagtuturo ako ng ingles, pero ni minsan hindi ko naisip na itakwil ang sarili kong wika. Ipinagmamalaki ko ang kagalingan ko sa Ingles at sa lahat ng oportunidad na naibigay nito pero nungka kong tatanggapin na para sa mga inuutusan lang ang wikang Pilipino.

    Sana mag-isip bago magsulat. Mag-isip. Pilipino ako, pero ito ay mula sa isang purong Tsino…

    Mahalaga ang pagmamahal sa isang wika. kase pag minamahal mo ang wika mo, minamahal mo ang lahi mo.

    Saludo ako sa lahat ng nag komento at inilalaban ang pagiging Pilipino sa kahit anong lengguwahe. PILIPINO AKO.

  45. August 27, 2011 at 12:36 am

    micca :

    Para sa manunulat ng blog na ito.. hindi po lahat ng Pilipino ay nakakapag internet. Kaya wag nyong isipin na ang lahat ng nagkukumento ay tamang representasyon ng lahat ng Pilipino. Sa usapan ng statistics, hindi sasapat ang bilang ng nagkomento.

    that is correct, not all pinoys have internet access. in fact, most of the pinoys who have internet access most likely belong to the ABC eco class. most of them post in english which supports one of the points raised in the soriano article – the rich speaks in english while the poor speak in filipino. that is a statement of observation, no value judgement.

    • Ray Estrada
      August 27, 2011 at 7:04 am

      Wawam, I see your point for defending Mr. Soriano’s comments but please answer this question. Do you also agree with Mr. Soriano in his statement that Filipino “is not the language of the learned”? Much of what Soriano said was pointed but nonetheless true and that we react in the manner we have is perhaps because we feel belittled or slighted by his pointing out that our native tongue, which in a big way we tie to our national identity, is insignificant or perhaps a necessary inconvenience to him. Unfortunately, this can also be said for many of the native languages of the world whether it be Afrikaan, Dutch, Vietnamese, or even Greek (from which many English words are derived). I guess English will be the fallback language for most nationalities if they are to communicate with other foreigners. Regardless of how we feel about it, at least for now, English will be the default language for international commerce or somewhat of a common ground for different nationalities to be able to discourse. I am sure that the big difference however is that in their case, it is English that they feel is a necessary inconvenience and that they learn it to be able to reach out to others in different parts of the world but their native tongue is still their preferred manner of speaking. Perhaps, the hundreds of years of colonization has ingrained in us a feeling that our own tongue is an inferior tongue. Nonetheless, it is a tongue that binds us as a people and establishes a kinship amongst fellow Filipinos. The attitude of Mr. Soriano, which we may be misunderstanding completely, tends to separate him from the fold or even isolate him if evidenced by the strong reaction to his essay. The perceived smugness of his attitude because he still has “connections” due to his command of the English language certainly isn’t winning him any favorable points

  46. Cotton
    August 27, 2011 at 12:45 am

    Bakit si rizal mahal ang sariling wika? etong matalinong ito hindi?

    • shinjeru
      August 27, 2011 at 11:56 am

      kasi hindi sya matalino… hindi nya nga na’express ng maayos sarili nya gamit ang salitang english. Gumamit sya ng english para magpakitang gilas… hindi nya lubos nauunawaan na ang wika kahit anu man yan ginagamit para sa COMMUNICATION at hindi para magkaroon ng conflict dahil sa misundertsanding and mis’interpretation

    • chaka
      October 4, 2011 at 4:29 pm

      e bkt nkaSPANISH ang NOLI ME TANGERE?

  47. question
    August 27, 2011 at 12:48 am

    Some questions, why is it that English is used primarily even in the government? just say for example the senate hearings?

    In school, why is it that even the government run schools use English as the primary mode of instruction?

    In the newspaper, where these all started, why are broadsheets in English and tabloids in Filipino?

    Why do most (not all) Filipinos still prefer to go abroad?

    Why do most Filipinos regard (on first instinct) foreign brands as better than local brands?

    Why do most Filipinos value Dollars more than Peso?

    I know there can be so much more questions to be thrown but isn’t it about time to reflect where or when in the system of developing the Filipino identity it all begins? the education system? the pop culture? the upbringing in the families? the media? i don’t know.

    I think James Soriano is pointing out more than just the language.

  48. August 27, 2011 at 1:19 am

    Soriano has every right to voice out his opinions negatively or not if he is proud of his heritage and language. However it is unfair that he need the urge to put it out on public and use crude terms such as “language of the streets” to prove a point that speaking Tagalog is futile. And the Country of Rotten Beef & Stinking Fish? langauge to talk to your Katulong – that was just plain unclassy for a man of his educated stature and accolades and very clearly an elitist. I’m my opinion A rish spoled brat fil-am wannabe.

    I’m surprised MB even let this slipped. English is a worldwide business language medium and like any other native tongue, is hard to grasp when you were raise to learn another. Im not a pure Pinoy and took me 10 years to say a “matinong” sentence in Tagalog. I am now learning my mother old language of Latin as she was a meztisa, on top of other languages I speak, and regardless if the country’s language I learned was from a high socio-economic standpoint or not, learning a foreign language is difficult. And my parents taught me in English, made me think in English and so did my school. Its true that some subjects are hard to teach in Tagalog merely for the fact of terminologies, but it can be done and students still learn. And Even though my upbringing slightly mirrors to Soriano, I don’t go out bashing other Tagalog speakers. in fact my parents taught me English so that when we travel to other countries or the US, there was an international language I could use (which makes sense). And they never taught me to be ashamed of my blood heritage…even though I am not pure Filipino.
    His views on this article however. was general if not specifically as if he was bashing every Tagalog speaker out there. His alma mater must be proud…after all he claims it was in UNIVERSITY (Ateneo) and also his mom force learning him English that made him changed his view on Tagalog (apple does not fall far form the tree).

    Its funny though that he thinks that Tagalog is such an inconvinient dialect for him to speak (and only for his provincial relatives) and puts English on a pedestal. How about countries like Japan, China, Germany, parts of South Africa, Middle East that also have difficult languages to learn. For them English is a business medium, or tourist medium. Not an identity of themselves.

    Ohh by the way, his article is reminiscent of our pre colonial era, he saus he is a split level Filipino? Really? He is just like the Peninsulares and Insulares of the days that insisted latin and Spanish was the language of the rish and educated and privileged and persecuted the Indios….well we know how that all ended for them during the Revolutions.

    Ohh FYI I used to teach Science, Math, Panitikan and English…and yes taught math in Tagalog. Not an easy task but some students understand the process better when you simplify the explanations in Tagalog (and in English)

  49. rickyzoo
    August 27, 2011 at 1:22 am

    a friend wrote this about soriano’s article (and i’m inclined to agree)”

    “Quite a lot of people have been angered by James Soriano’s column. I myself thought he raised a lot of valid points–unsavory realities that reflect our politics, culture and history.

    If there’s something I would fault in the essay, it would be its insularity. Such insularity has resulted in the essay’s condescending tone–whether or not James Soriano is actually as coñotic in person is of course, beyond my knowledge.”

  50. sven turpentine
    August 27, 2011 at 3:06 am

    It’s simple. You speak in English when you are spoken to in English. Mag-FIlipino ka kung kausapin ka sa FIlipino. I still think this article is seething with arrogance, and nothing will ever change my mind. Plus it’s really badly written.

  51. Porsha Rodora
    August 27, 2011 at 3:07 am

    Tama po ba, bilingual ang Filipino Language? Para siyang Tagalog na nahaluan ng mga banyagang salita? Hindi ako masyadong nakakakausap ng mga “street people” at mga katulong pero madalas, Filipino ang gamit kong wika. Pag kausap ko ang mga prof ko, College Secretary, boss, ate at ina (parehong guro ng English subjects), Filipino ang gamit ko. Nag-report din kami dati sa Landscape Architecture Class ko sa wikang Filipino. Pinayagan din kami maghalo ng Filipino words sa Thesis presentation namin. Hindi rin naman siguro tamang sabihin na ang pinaggagamitan ko ng wikang Filipino ay yung mga taong “katulongs” at “manongs” lang. Pag Pilipino ang kausap ko (na marunong naman mag-Filipino), Filipino ang wikang gamit ko. Masyadong generalized lang talaga siguro yung article.

  52. tee
    August 27, 2011 at 3:08 am

    It’s simple. You speak in English when you are spoken to in English. Mag-FIlipino ka kung kausapin ka sa FIlipino. I still think this article is seething with arrogance, and nothing will ever change my mind. Plus it’s really badly written. What is up with covering up for this idiot anyway?

  53. win
    August 27, 2011 at 3:19 am

    I think his article was written from his personal point of view or experiences. It was not written to be taken as a fact. In fact, even if it was written as such, I don’t see any emotion or judgment from the tone of the article, merely observations coming from someone in his world. Nowhere in his article did I feel that he lambasted the Filipino language or the Filipino people, because his writing is without emotion. He even acknowledged that he does “smell worse than a malansang isda”.

    And from this I think his tone was of realization and humility: “It was really only in university that I began to grasp Filipino in terms of language and not just dialect. Filipino was not merely a peculiar variety of language, derived and continuously borrowing from the English and Spanish alphabets; it was its own system, with its own grammar, semantics, sounds, even symbols.But more significantly, it was its own way of reading, writing, and thinking. There are ideas and concepts unique to Filipino that can never be translated into another. Try translating bayanihan, tagay, kilig or diskarte. Only recently have I begun to grasp Filipino as the language of identity: the language of emotion, experience, and even of learning. And with this comes the realization that I do, in fact, smell worse than a malansang isda.”

    By his statement saying that Filipino “is not the language of the learned”, I think he meant that if you know the English language you are one of the more educated people. He didn’t say that English should be your mother tongue to be one of the “learned”, nor did he say that if you speak to your mother in Filipino then you must be “bobo” or she must be a “katulong”. Let us not exaggerate. As with most of us who doesn’t live in an English-speaking environment, I, too, speak with everyone in Filipino but can also converse in English should the need arise. I don’t take offense in his statements because I don’t live in his world.

    English is an international language while Filipino is not. That is simply a fact. That’s why for some if not most of us, especially the OFW’s, English is something we want to learn. But that is not to say that Filipino is a lesser language and speaking in English doesn’t mean that you have shunned your nationality. If that is so, why then would beauty pageant contestants answer questions in English.

    Besides, who could blame him. E sa mga teleserye palang natin ganoon na ang pinapakita. Mga mayayaman na kadalasan ay may may-ari ng isang kompanya ay nag-iingles, mga mahihirap naman na kadalasan ay pawang tindera lamang ay nagtatagalog at hindi marunong mag-ingles. Sa mga eksenang may board meeting makikita mo na ang mga karakter ay nag-iingles kahit hirap na hirap yoong artista. Kung tayo mismo ganyan ang ipinapalabas sa telebisyon bilang realidad ng buhay, bakit tayo masasaktan kung mayroong isang taong sumulat tungkol dito.

    This is what became of our culture and society. It is not the ideal but it is the reality. But I must admit he could’ve written it with more tact and sensitivity, given that it is a sensitive topic and we are sensitive people. Again, this would be my opinion on the matter and I respect other opinions. I would just like to present another point of view.

  54. August 27, 2011 at 3:31 am

    It’s a sad reality and i do agree that English is the language of the learned. Most Filipinos are “learned” regardless of what school they were in or which level they have attained. But what he pointed out and the readers failed to see is how language reflects the hypocrisy and shallowness of Filipinos. What he wrote is a big “in your face” to those who cannot accept that in fact the Filipino speaking culture is dictated by how well u know English. It’s a status symbol, more like a nokia 3210 to an iPhone. Why did Jose Rizal wrote his famous line “Ang hindi magmahal sa sariling wika, ay masahol pa sa malansang isda?” Because then Filipinos wanted to speak Spanish and only the indios speak Tagalog. Then and now, We are trying to embrace a life of prejudice and discrimination. Our heroes fought for this, but we never learned.

    Most Filipinos do know how to read, speak and write in English. As an OFW, I can very well compare my skills to other Asians in terms of this. i feel confident to speak to them in English even if at times my grammar is not perfect. I do feel the same confidence when i communicate to those whose mother tongue is English. But whenever I speak to my “kabayan” english, They feel intimidated by me…. It seems like I’m making them feel inferior. That’s our sad sad culture… and that’s reality. English is not only the language of the learned… but the language that puts our non-progressing country in a modern caste system.

    • August 29, 2011 at 1:48 am

      Ay, pareho tayo ng sentiments. Although I don’t agree about English being the language of the learned. But I do get the point he’s driving at. Thanks to Wawam here.

      Let’s not do the same to our kids and make them cherish Filipino instead. Balita sa wikang atin, is a good start. May the good teachers do the rest.

  55. ihaveafeeling
    August 27, 2011 at 3:36 am

    I have a feeling wawam is James Soriano disguising himself hahaha… defensive much? haha

    On a serious note… Ganito lang kasimple yun wawam… maaring may “truth” sa mga examples na binigay nya (schools, tinderas, maids)… but he TWISTED those ‘truths/fatcs’ to make a very LOUSY, HASTY conclusion and generalization…

    I’ll say it in English too wawam, in case you you have difficulty speaking Filipino:

    It’s as simple as this, there might be some truth to the examples he cited (about the schools, vendors, maids)… but he TWISTED those ‘truths/fatcs’ to make a very LOUSY, HASTY conclusion and generalization…

    Abay learned ba yung ganun? Simpleng Philo 12 (that’s Logic class btw in UP), hindi papasa yan kasi sisigawan kagad yan ng professor, “Fallacy!” hehehe

    Hindi porket marunong mag-english, magaling/learned na… content over form dapat… simple as that…

    If that was his attempt at a satire, poor him… he failed miserably. sayang may potential yung premise niya, bulok naman conclusion.. diosko God help us! hahaha

  56. August 27, 2011 at 4:46 am

    Soriano has every right to voice out his opinions negatively or not if he is proud of his heritage and language. However it is unfair that he need the urge to put it out on public and use crude terms such as “language of the streets” to prove a point that speaking Tagalog is futile. And the Country of Rotten Beef & Stinking Fish? langauge to talk to your Katulong – that was just plain unclassy for a man of his educated stature and accolades and very clearly an elitist. I’m my opinion A rish spoled brat fil-am wannabe.

    I’m surprised MB even let this slipped. English is a worldwide business language medium and like any other native tongue, is hard to grasp when you were raise to learn another. Im not a pure Pinoy and took me 10 years to say a “matinong” sentence in Tagalog. I am now learning my mother old language of Latin as she was a meztisa, on top of other languages I speak, and regardless if the country’s language I learned was from a high socio-economic standpoint or not, learning a foreign language is difficult. And my parents taught me in English, made me think in English and so did my school. Its true that some subjects are hard to teach in Tagalog merely for the fact of terminologies, but it can be done and students still learn. And Even though my upbringing slightly mirrors to Soriano, I don’t go out bashing other Tagalog speakers. in fact my parents taught me English so that when we travel to other countries or the US, there was an international language I could use (which makes sense). And they never taught me to be ashamed of my blood heritage…even though I am not pure Filipino.
    His views on this article however. was general if not specifically as if he was bashing every Tagalog speaker out there. His alma mater must be proud…after all he claims it was in UNIVERSITY (Ateneo) and also his mom force learning him English that made him changed his view on Tagalog (apple does not fall far form the tree).

    Its funny though that he thinks that Tagalog is such an inconvinient dialect for him to speak (and only for his provincial relatives) and puts English on a pedestal. How about countries like Japan, China, Germany, parts of South Africa, Middle East that also have difficult languages to learn. For them English is a business medium, or tourist medium. Not an identity of themselves.

    Ohh by the way, his article is reminiscent of our pre colonial era, he saus he is a split level Filipino? Really? He is just like the Peninsulares and Insulares of the days that insisted latin and Spanish was the language of the rish and educated and privileged and persecuted the Indios….well we know how that all ended for them during the Revolutions.

    Ohh FYI I used to teach Science, Math, Panitikan and English…and yes taught math in Tagalog. Not an easy task but some students understand the process better when you simplify the explanations in Tagalog (and in English)

  57. August 27, 2011 at 6:33 am

    I agree with Jeproks. It seems that you are injecting your own interpretation of what Soriano wrote and using that as basis to say that what Soriano is saying is true. What you think he said and what he actually said are two different things. Please try not to present them as one and the same.

    Also, I would just like to point out that there is no communication theory that supports the postulate that there is a “divide” in language use. Language is seen only as a communication technology, a means to carry a message. As I tweeted you earlier, effective communication transcends language.

    Which is why I don’t understand your confusion when people criticize Soriano in English. Ano ang pagkakaiba ng pagsabi ko na “mali si Soriano” at “Soriano is wrong?” What’s the relevance? Kung piliin kong mag-Ingles para tugunan ang sulat ni Soriano, ano ang masama doon? How does it contradict our position that Soriano’s distinction of ‘language of the learned” and “language of the streets” is misplaced? Kahit bali-baliktarin ko ang pananalita ko, pareho lang naman ang sanisabi ko. Gaya ng sinabi ko kanina: effective communication transcends language.

    • August 29, 2011 at 2:02 am

      sweet bottomline raggster. in tagalog, “tamis siguro nang bikini mo” hahaha

      Seriously, baka nga hindi problema ang paggamit nang english to get a job. baka nga di rin problema ang fact na ginagamit sya to learn in the classroom. The problem is the assertion that the english language is much more superior, and that is certainly not an excuse to bitch slap our society as “rotting beef and stinking fish”. satire or no satire

  58. German V. Gervacio
    August 27, 2011 at 6:35 am

    james, upo ka sa klase ko. medyo mali ang hulog mo e. ayusin natin nang konti. sagot ko na isnak. pili ka lang–pisbol, yogyog o syakoy? puwede ring dodol pag diniskas natin ang darangen :)

  59. SkinMD
    August 27, 2011 at 6:53 am

    I think James Soriano is just an insecure person who has to prove his worth. His articles (check out the article he wrote in 2008 on the same subject.) are shallow and are really more about pointing out that he’s privileged rather than making a deep examination of the Filipino and English languages. People who are secure about themselves don’t need brag about their achievements or their station in life. He’s young and the scope of his mind is small. I hope he realizes that there are bigger things in life and in this world than this.

  60. thepetchai
  61. ralf
    August 27, 2011 at 8:08 am

    I would agree to some points that James Soriano has mentioned on his article. I share same feelings when we have to learn Filipino at school way back. It may come natural to people who are in Northern Philippines to converse in Filipino. Don’t get me wrong for equating Tagalog as Filipino, I know a lot of words are derived from different dialects in our country though the prominent dialect is Tagalog and Visayan/Cebuano. A number of people in Cebu talks in Cebuano or English, that makes it a lot harder to get Filipino language mastered. Being said, I would say it may be hard to learn but a lot has learned Filipino and converse in a very understandable way, which I am proud of. We are people of one nation and we owe a lot to our elders for having Filipino as a means of connecting our people among the islands. It may be a pain in the a** to learn, but we must and it is indeed very useful.
    J. Soriano may be unconscious with the choice of words he used and quoting Filipino as the “language of the streets” and English as the “language of the learned.” It is very wrong to say this dude and it may your personal opinion to thank your education as to making English as your mother language, but there are a lot of LEARNED individuals who prefers speaking in FILIPINO and individuals who earned the highest education but stays true to retaining their natural accent of English. In return the people you call in the street can comprehend English and can talk in English, it may not be as good as a person who has been privately tutored like you or has finished a very high education but man, where can you find a tourist asking for directions and being answered by Manang and finds his way to the said place? Filipinos strive hard and survive the world, I am proud!

    When I hear kababayans, coming home from US or anywhere else and hear them talk in fluent English with Filipino accent, I am proud of them. It is very frustrating when you see or hear Filipinos laugh at a friend who cannot speak a well-constructed and pronounced English sentence. Let’s start helping, instead of laughing. In pains me most to see a personality in YouTube having thousand plus views on a single video trying to be a comedian by using a very crooked accent, mimicking Filipino accent in English where it is known that she can speak a very good English and Filipino at the same time. She is very pretty and seemed a sweet person, and I am not a hater either but one must be responsible. She is representing Philippines in the world of media and internet. If we want to be understood and respected, why do we have to ridicule our own language and accent? (You must have seen her videos as she was featured in a local TV show, but I have not seen .)

    Is our accent meant to be for a comedy show? Let’s help these kids understand. There is nothing wrong if a person speaks in Filipino or have a Filipino accent English. (I understand its pleasant to listen and it is set as standards by our schoolsto have an English accent . Let’s all consider that not all of us can get the best of the education. Let’s help them if you are better, don’t laugh or make fun of your countrymen.

    “Let’s all help instead of condemning and making fun of something. Our nation will move forward if this will be done.”

  62. jose
    August 27, 2011 at 8:16 am

    Don’t make “English is the language of the learned” an excuse not to master and value Filipino. Filipino is being taught from elementary to high school, and sometimes even up until college. Mr. Soriano finds it hard to read and write in Filipino not because English is the language of the learned. He was given enough time to learn and appreciate the language. Maybe he is not just intelligent enough to master two different languages (English and Filipino) at the same time..

    • sweet19
      August 27, 2011 at 7:51 pm

      tama yan! ang Ingles ay para sa mga taong talagang pinanganak sa mga bansang katutubong lingwahe na nila iyon at ang Filipino ay para sa bansang Filipinas. sana naisip nya yun.

    • Kurama
      August 29, 2011 at 12:58 am

      Hahaha, oo nga ano? Ako nga eh, apat (Filipino, Waray, Cebuano at Ingles) pa ang lengguwahe ko pero sa awa ng Diyos..ni sa hinagap..hindi pumasok sa isip ko ang mga sinabi ng huwad na manunulat. O_o

  63. bisita
    August 27, 2011 at 8:50 am

    fact of the matter is, our educational system prioritizes using english as the teaching language. when i was in college, our class was used as a guinea pig by having math of investments thought to us in tagalog. patay! ang hirap talaga, saka gumagamit pa rin ng english terms kasi wala naman talaga katumbas sa filipino yung karamihan sa mga terms.

    i read, write and think in filipino. filipino is my mother language. pero kung kinakailangan, kaya kong magbasa, magsulat at magisip sa ingles. siguro, dapat na lang natin kunin sa sinulat nya na talagang may mali sa education system natin.

    nakikita ko naman kung anong nais iparating ni james soriano. however, he could have written it in a better way.

  64. August 27, 2011 at 9:30 am

    if there’s anything that defenders cannot deny about this article, it is the manner and tone of how he justified his point: elitist and arrogant. yes, james soriano has valid arguments but what he does not know is that there are filipino readers who are smart enough to read between the lines. this could very well be acceptable to a particular community (read: the ateneo) and not get this widespread attention and fury. i’m curious whether the ateneo community is happy about his piece.

  65. Xxxaynxxx
    August 27, 2011 at 9:55 am

    Di ko naintindihan bakit nya nasabing “filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom “. Wow nakakatuwa sana kung totoo hehe. Kawawang bata ito, napalaki ng magulang sa maling akala. Oo, tama na lamang talaga ang taong bilingual o trilingual o nao man ang tawag don, lalo kung ang sukat ng “world” mo ay di 100 kilometro paikot :D at di lang isang bansa ang nasasakupan ng mundong ito. Sino nga ba ang nagpauso sa jan na kapag ang isang taong magaling mag english ay matalino o aral? Ang lengwahe pagaralan mo lang at gamitin araw araw ay matutunan mo rin. Ang punto ko, kahit ano pang lengwahe ang gamit ng isang tao ang basihan ng katalinuhan ay ang nilalaman at punto ng sinulat.

    Kaya naman english ang gamit natin sa court room dahil kinopya lang natin ang batas natin sa estados unidos, hehehe kaunting doktor doktor lang batas na natin. Kaya ang mga makalumang terminolohiya pa rin ang english natin. Para naman sa technolohiya, iilan lang ba ang likhang pinoy? Na matatawag nating sariling atin? Kaya sa operating room o laboratoryo taglish ang salita o kaya english. Dahil di naman tayo ang nakaimbento ng scalpel at microscope hehe.

    Kaya nasabi kong mali ang pagpalaki sa kanya ng magulang nya dahil dapat pinaliwag ng nanay nya or Mommy lol na ang english ay gagamitin lang kung ang taong kausap mo ay di marunong magtagalog. Na kaya sya hinahasa magsalita ng english para lumawag oportunidad nya sa buhay. Na ang Filipino ay para sa katulong, driver, tindahan.

    Sa tingin ko, walang problema sa sistema ng edukasyon natin, napakaraming Pilipino na nagpakadalubhasa sa ibat ibang bansa na produkto ng sistemang ito. Ang mali sa palagay ko ay ang mentalidad ng karamihan sa atin. Masyado tayong nasisilaw sa mga tagumpay natin sa buhay na tingin natin don sa mga medyo minalas sa buhay ay sa walang pinagaralan at bobo na di nakakaintindi ng english gaya ng mga driver, katulong tindera atbp.

    Ang mentalidad na ito ay namana ng mga makabagong henerasyon sa kanilang mapagmataas na mga magulang. Sana maintindihan natin na di lahat ang tao ay nagtatagumpay (dumami ang salapi para makabayad ng driver at katuong), na kailangan din merong mamalasin para merong gagawa sa mga bagay na di na kayang gawin ng mga nagtagumpay! Hehe. Na lahat ng tao ay merong responsibilidad sa lipunan na dapat gampanan.

    Hay! Kung ito isinulat ko sa french o english meron bang pagkakaiba sa ibig kong sabihin?

  66. August 27, 2011 at 10:35 am

    Ray Estrada :

    Wawam, I see your point for defending Mr. Soriano’s comments but please answer this question. Do you also agree with Mr. Soriano in his statement that Filipino “is not the language of the learned”? Much of what Soriano said was pointed but nonetheless true and that we react in the manner we have is perhaps because we feel belittled or slighted by his pointing out that our native tongue, which in a big way we tie to our national identity, is insignificant or perhaps a necessary inconvenience to him. Unfortunately, this can also be said for many of the native languages of the world whether it be Afrikaan, Dutch, Vietnamese, or even Greek (from which many English words are derived). I guess English will be the fallback language for most nationalities if they are to communicate with other foreigners. Regardless of how we feel about it, at least for now, English will be the default language for international commerce or somewhat of a common ground for different nationalities to be able to discourse. I am sure that the big difference however is that in their case, it is English that they feel is a necessary inconvenience and that they learn it to be able to reach out to others in different parts of the world but their native tongue is still their preferred manner of speaking. Perhaps, the hundreds of years of colonization has ingrained in us a feeling that our own tongue is an inferior tongue. Nonetheless, it is a tongue that binds us as a people and establishes a kinship amongst fellow Filipinos. The attitude of Mr. Soriano, which we may be misunderstanding completely, tends to separate him from the fold or even isolate him if evidenced by the strong reaction to his essay. The perceived smugness of his attitude because he still has “connections” due to his command of the English language certainly isn’t winning him any favorable points

    people are reacting to the word “learned”. let’s make sure we have the same understanding of the meaning of the word:

    1. (adj) erudite, learned
    having or showing profound knowledge
    Synonyms: conditioned, well-read, knowledgeable, learned, well-educated, erudite, knowing, lettered
    Antonyms: unscholarly, uneducated

    2. (adj) knowing, knowledgeable, learned, lettered, well-educated, well-read
    highly educated; having extensive information or understanding
    Synonyms: intentional, conditioned, well-read, knowledgeable, learned, wise(p), intimate, well-educated, erudite, versed, knowing, wise to(p), lettered
    Antonyms: uneducated, unscholarly

    3. (adj) conditioned, learned
    established by conditioning or learning
    Synonyms: in condition(p), well-educated, conditioned, well-read, knowledgeable, learned, knowing, erudite, lettered
    Antonyms: uneducated, unscholarly

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/learned

    within the context of the article that soriano wrote, this word
    learned” refers to those who were unable to get an education or those who are unable to complete an education.

    statistics from the DepEd shows a large number of pinoys do not graduate from college. so that confirms soriano’s statement.

    • Xxxaynxxx
      August 27, 2011 at 7:01 pm

      Wawan, wawa ka naman. Ang sabi ng diksyonaryo daw ay ang “learned” di nangangahulugan na na nakatapos ng coleheyo. Di lahat ng kaalaman ay nakuuha sa ateneo este unibersidad. Kung si inday mahilig magbasa at nakakaintindi ng ng utos mo, learned din sya sa tungkulin nyang ginagampanan sa lipunan. Ganon din si manong. Ano bang problema ng taong tulad mo na di naintihan ang simpleng kaalaman. Respeto lang sa lahat ng uri ng nilalang yan! Yon lang po ang gustong ipahiwatig ng mga taong di sumangayon kay james. Wag mong itaas ang sarili dahil nakapagtapos ng coleheyo o kahit na ano pang tayog na narating ng isang tao. Mana ko lang ang kaalaman na yan sa pinoy nakapagtapos ng “MS” nya ibat ibang bansa sa europe at kasalukuyang nagaaral ng “PhD” sa hilagang america. Simpleng tao na nagiisip na kahit sinong pinoy kaya ring gawin ang nagawa nya kaya lang medyo pinalad lang sya.

      • August 27, 2011 at 7:14 pm

        it;s really very simple – those who are educated, those who go through high school and college learn english. those who do not learn not so much english because there are very few opportunities for it. that is the reference to the “learned”. don’t confuse the issue..

    • Jeff
      August 28, 2011 at 4:21 am

      @ wawam – ibig bang sabihin na kapag hindi ka grumadweyt ng kolehiyo eh hindi ka na marunong mag english? babaw naman ng conclusion mo.

  67. August 27, 2011 at 10:39 am

    Jeproks :

    You left out this part: “It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.” You insist that the article speaks of reality and the truth… How much truth is in the quoted sentence above? And how much truth is in your statement that “The rich speak in English while the poor speak in Filipino”. Do you have statistics to prove that? Actually, why don’t we backtrack a bit and define what “rich” is… Are we talking of hundred thousands or millions in family money? Or are we talking of the sosyals riding the flashy car with manong driver in uniform? Contrary to your or Soriano’s belief, there are educated Filipinos who speak very good English, hold high-paying jobs as professionals but use Filipino as their primary language- meaning they use Filipino to communicate not only with the fishball vendor, the manong guard and the mayordoma of the mansion, but also with their parents (both also educated and are professionals who contribute to society), brothers and sisters, friends and other educated people who happen to like speaking in Filipino. What do you make of this people? In what reality can people who can speak perfect English when they want or need to to but choose to speak Filipino exist and be considered as educated/learned individuals? Definitely not in your nor Soriano’s reality.

    Nice spin on the unequal distribution of wealth but I don’t think Soriano’s article is about that. Suggesting that Soriano was actually trying to deliver that message is giving him too much credit. Nice try, but that won’t save the article.

    refer to previous post for the answer.

  68. August 27, 2011 at 10:46 am

    Minch :

    opo, try ko po isang beses,,,, hehehe,,, ngumiti po ang Boss ko at ang nasabi nia, nangangampanya ka ba? hehehe lahat po kami sa opisina nagtawanan kasi po yong Boss ko palagi seryoso at di mo makita ngumingiti….its a relief kasi di sia nagalit and to our surprise he approved the request as per what written sa letter…

    hahaha,,,tawa nga ako ngaun kasi naalala ko,,, ginamit po kasi na mga salita ang lalalim sabi pa nga ng kasama ko maiintindihan nia kaya itoh? hehehe kasi alam namin nag aral sia sa Amerika at nag trabaho dun.. he is a Pilipino umuwi sia dito para dito tumira at mag business….

    nakalimutan ni Soriano ilagay sa Article ni Mr. Soriano sa article nia at tama bang i correct? Filipino is Street Languange pero ang ating Presidente, Senator, Congressman, Mayor, at mga Kagawads pag panahon ng election nangangampanya sa taong bayan ang salitang ginagamit ay Filipino,,, bakit pag nasa Senado at Congresso hehehe English ang gamit?

    “Filipino is Street Languange pero ang ating Presidente, Senator, Congressman, Mayor, at mga Kagawads pag panahon ng election nangangampanya sa taong bayan ang salitang ginagamit ay Filipino,,, bakit pag nasa Senado at Congresso hehehe English ang gamit?”

    your observation is correct and it actually proves the point that i have raised and see in the soriano article – that there is a social divide in language where the poor speak in filipino and the rich speak in english, that is coming from such an inequitable distribution of wealth and educational opportunities in this country that we all need to first accept and recognize, then do something about it.

    the reason politicians including the president speak in filipino is that a large majority of the voters/population are poor and therefore understand filipino much better versus english. they speak in the language that their target audience speak and understand. around 85% of the population belong to the poor, the DE socio-eco class.

    the reason the politicians speak in english in congress also supports the point – these politicians belong to the affluent class and therefore they they are able to speak fluent english and use the same language to communicate to other politicians who are also affluent.

    your example proves the point.

  69. August 27, 2011 at 11:06 am

    raggster :

    Which is why I don’t understand your confusion when people criticize Soriano in English. Ano ang pagkakaiba ng pagsabi ko na “mali si Soriano” at “Soriano is wrong?” What’s the relevance? Kung piliin kong mag-Ingles para tugunan ang sulat ni Soriano, ano ang masama doon? How does it contradict our position that Soriano’s distinction of ‘language of the learned” and “language of the streets” is misplaced? Kahit bali-baliktarin ko ang pananalita ko, pareho lang naman ang sanisabi ko. Gaya ng sinabi ko kanina: effective communication transcends language.

    please read from my post:

    we know of the divide in wealth, opportunities, jobs, justice and education in philippine society where the rich are able to get the best and the mostest (intended) while the poor make do with meager offerings. the truth hurts to know that that also exists in language.

    with inequitable distribution of wealth comes inequitable opportunities in education that results to inequitable distribution of language skills and ends up in inequitable distribution of job opportunities which goes back to inequitable distribution of wealth.

    the divide, a wide one between the poor and the rich is one of the most enduring problems in philippine society. it is not only an issue of poverty, it is an issue of inequitable distribution of wealth where a very small portion of the population control a very large portion of the wealth of the country while a very large population are poor dividing among themselves a very meager portion of the wealth of the country.

    marketing puts it at 85% of the population belonging to the poor, the DE socio eco class while only 15% at most belong to the ABC socio-eco class.

    also this, my reply to a comment:

    that is correct, not all pinoys have internet access. in fact, most of the pinoys who have internet access most likely belong to the ABC eco class. most of them post in english which supports one of the points raised in the soriano article – the rich speaks in english while the poor speak in filipino. that is a statement of observation, no value judgement.

  70. August 27, 2011 at 11:19 am

    some were true… but don’t like this statement…” English is not the language of the learned”

  71. August 27, 2011 at 11:22 am

    Sana po nilagay ni Mr. Soriano sa Article nia na Filipino is Masses Language to learn by him para pagtumakbo sia sa pulitiko maintindihan sia ng madlang people…naging mabusisi sana sia sa mga words na ginamit nia,,,, na di makapanakit sa kapwa…

    At pagnahalal na sia sa Kongresso,,, ang una nyang bigyan pansin ay yong edukasyon para kay Tindera, Driver, at Katulong para maging fluent sa English at sa ganun di nia na kailangan mag Filipino para maintindihan ng Outside Wold na sinasabi nia.

  72. etabnomongo
    August 27, 2011 at 11:24 am

    I get each and everyone’s point. However, as I see it, this is an outright insult to the Filipino language. For those parents who uses english as a primary language in their homes, I don’t see anything wrong with it. But if you send your kids to good schools like Ateneo and yet they feel it’s hard work to learn Filipino simply because it is the language of the street, then there must be something wrong. I don’t care if you people speak english instead of Filipino, but please do not insult the Filipino speakers by saying it’s the language of the yayas or drivers, or even manangs. FYI: Just because a person went to a good school and is well off doesn’t mean he/she is learned. I never finished college, went to 9 different schools and yet did not finish. Am I learned, GUESS NOT!!! But I sure know how to identify an insult to my language and to my fellow Filipinos. I may be using english to write this comment, but think about it, majority of americans did not finish college. Could it be possible that english is a street language too? And only the feeling high and mighty so called Filipinos use it as a means to turn their insecurity around by placing themselves on the pedestal. Now I appreciate the president of the Philippines who also came from the same school as Mr. Soriano, and in fact even stayed in the U.S. for quite sometime, because he speaks the Filipino street language as often as he can. Is our president from the street too? I don’t think so…. But I guess i’ll just have to end this comment by using the Filipino street language: “PUTANGINA NIYONG MGA PA SOSYAL AT WALA KAYONG BAHID NG PAG KA FILIPINO SA PUSO NIYO!!!!! KUNG AYAW NIYO NG PAMBANSANG WIKA, MAG SILAYAS KAYO SA PILINAS!!!! HINDI KAYO KAWALAN!!!! KAYA NAG HIHIRAP ANG PILIPINAS DAHIL SA INYONG MGA UTAK TALANKA!!! MGA HINDOT KAYO!!!!

  73. August 27, 2011 at 11:30 am

    ang sama ng ugali ng batang to.. di naturuan yata ng mabuti ng magulang…
    mapagmataas…

  74. clarasfreedom
    August 27, 2011 at 11:31 am

    Nakakainsulto ang article ni James Soriano para sa mga FIlipino na na nagsusumikap na iangat ang antas nila sa buhay.

    • Kurama
      August 29, 2011 at 1:30 am

      Nabigla nga rin ako sa mga salita niya. Nahiya ako para sa kanya sa totoo lang. D:

  75. August 27, 2011 at 11:32 am

    yana :

    right…only that they are most likely the “tinderas, the manongs and the drivers. that’s a whole lot better isn’t it?

    that is the truth.

  76. clarasfreedom
    August 27, 2011 at 11:32 am

    nandiyan ang punto pero mali ata ang kinalabasan ng pagtuturo sa kanya ng Ingles bilang isang pangunahing lengwahe. “Banyaga sa sariling bayan.”

    • August 27, 2011 at 11:36 am

      that is true for all schools in the country,private or public. books are in english, the medium of instruction are in english, exams are in english.

      • c.o.
        August 28, 2011 at 3:02 pm

        “that is true for ALL schools in the country,private or public.” A very glaring fallacy. Maybe in your version of the Philippines, Mr./Ms. Wawam. That or your definition of school is limited to Ateneo-Xavier-La Salle and all the schools elites (and elitists) go to.

  77. August 27, 2011 at 11:37 am

    maswerte sya at nakapagaral.. at nakapagtapos… pero ang ugali ang baho……decay of society……… magiging humble naman to pag na sampolan ng nasa taas…. masyado na kasing mataas ang lipad … kaya ayaw nang tumingin sa baba…..

    kala nya ang galing galing nya dahil magaling mag ingles.. tsk tsk tsk

  78. Isagani
    August 27, 2011 at 11:39 am

    James makes a valid point but at the same time English and Filipino are two languages that will always be part of our culture. My father is a doctor and he uses the Filipino language for his patients. My mother is a consultant for major international companies like Accenture and Nestle and they still use the Filipino language (obviously for those who can speak it). I’ve never talked to a jeepney driver in english because the truth is a lot of those people have never had the opportunity to learn english. People need to realize that James is talking about his views form how he was raised. I don’t think he meant any offense to anyone other then being blunt about what the truth is. There’s no problem with being a good english speaker and it is sad that some of people are horrible Filipino speakers but it’s the truth. the Philippines is one of the most diverse countries in the world so of course there will be very different views from the each end. If you think he was belittling the people who can’t speak english then you’re missing the point because the sad truth is not everyone has the opportunities that James had and it’s unfair to judge him based on that. His statements can be misconstrued as being crude or disrespectful but at the end of it it’s his point of view, it’s the truth based on how he was raised and that’s it. Please stop bashing this person because of this because none of us know him and at least he had the courage to address one of the more major problems of our country. It really just boils down to the division of the rich and poor and (i’m assuming we are all educated and mature people here) instead of bashing this person we should understand the meaning of his message and try instead to lessen that gap between rich and poor because as long as that gap exists then there will always be elitists and there will be those who are not.

    • semperfidelis
      August 27, 2011 at 5:37 pm

      Yes, James is speaking from his own point of view on how he was raised. However, do you consider the words he used as proper to describe the Filipino language? In presenting his own view and just for the sake of having something to write, he bashed the Filipino language in a way that a Filipino should not be doing!

  79. August 27, 2011 at 11:44 am

    Bading si James Soriano at ang mga umaayon dito…..he he he. May masabi lang sa kanyang artikulo, minaliit na ang wikang filipino….hoy james mabaho ka pa sa malansang isda….ha ha ha.

    • Dwend
      August 27, 2011 at 2:06 pm

      Baho din ng argument mo.

  80. Eunice C.Novio
    August 27, 2011 at 11:49 am

    James Soriano, napakahusay mo pala sa debate. Pero huwag mo naman sanang maliitin ang wikang Filipino. Hindi lang ikaw ang marunong mag-ingles. At sana huwag mo naman sabihin ulit na English is the language of the “learned”. Ano ba ang kahulugan sa iyo ng salitang “learned?” Pati naman ang mga bansang hindi nagsasalita ng Ingles isinama mo na dito. Hindi ba sila “learned” dahil hindi nila alam ang English Alphabet mo, o ang mga English coloring books mo? Pumunta ka dito sa Thailand, para malaman mo kung kailangan mo talagang magsalita ng Ingles dito at nang makita mo kung sino ang mas “learned”. Ang mga taong tulad mo na nagsasalita, nag-iisip at nagdadasal sa Ingles o ang mga taong hindi nakakaunawa (at ayaw unawain) ang Ingles.

    James Soriano, sana pinapakinggan ka ni Bathala kapag nagdadasal ka ng Ingles.

  81. August 27, 2011 at 12:14 pm

    the problem with having your son study in Ateneo is that they’re boxed within the confines of the community. the minute you send them to the “outside world”, they pee their khakis at the thought of sweating under the smoldering heat. ever wondered why Ateneans never, EVER, had an ounce of street cred? it’s because of brats like this guy. you wanna find the brightest minds, go to UP. you wanna find out who kicked Ateneo out of the NCAA for lack of testicular fortitude, go to San Beda

    • August 27, 2011 at 4:18 pm

      I graduated from UP but taught in Ateneo HS. Ateneans might not have the street cred of UP grads but they are actually very nice people. James is more of an aberration (maybe Wawam too). But most of my students are fluent in English as well as in Filipino. I even remember being awed by the plays that my students put up, in Filipino.I have been to the homes of some of the richest people in the country…and surprise surprise, they actually spoke in Filipino. It’s the pretentious people who try to speak English everywhere. BTW, there are plenty of assholes in UP too.

      • Kurama
        August 29, 2011 at 1:44 am

        Pero wala akong alam na taga-UP na hinamak ng ganun-ganun lang ang Wikang Filipino. At ang asshole na sinasabi mo, karaniwan na iyon kahit naman saan. Lol. Nga pla, UP grad din ako.

  82. uno
    August 27, 2011 at 12:38 pm

    ibig bang sabihin na si chiz escudero ay hinde “learned” kasi mas nais niyang gamitin ang salitang sariling atin? ang aking mga magulang ay di nakapag tapos ng kolehiyo di sila gaanong marunong mag salita ng ingles subalit may negosyo sila at napag-aral nila kaming 3 magkakapatid sa pribadong eskwelahan mula elementarya hangang kolehiyo may roon silang mga paupahan mga bahay sa madaling sabi di kami naghirap..sila ba ay mamaliitin mo din mister soriano? ang mga tinuturing mong manong at manang na di nakakapag salita ng ingles, pano ka nakakasigurado na di sila marunong? di lahat ng nakapag-aral mister soriano ay katulad mong nais ipaglantaran na magaling sa ingles..

  83. EValdee
    August 27, 2011 at 12:43 pm

    Ahh, the irony of it all. James Soriano’s piece was meant to be a satire. And self-deprecating. If you don’t get that, then allow me to point out the following paragraphs:

    “It was really only in university that I began to grasp Filipino in terms of language and not just dialect. Filipino was not merely a peculiar variety of language, derived and continuously borrowing from the English and Spanish alphabets; it was its own system, with its own grammar, semantics, sounds, even symbols.

    “But more significantly, it was its own way of reading, writing, and thinking. There are ideas and concepts unique to Filipino that can never be translated into another. Try translating bayanihan, tagay, kilig or diskarte.

    “Only recently have I begun to grasp Filipino as the language of identity: the language of emotion, experience, and even of learning. And with this comes the realization that I do, in fact, smell worse than a malansang isda. My own language is foreign to me: I speak, think, read and write primarily in English. To borrow the terminology of Fr. Bulatao, I am a split-level Filipino.”

    • Seeker
      August 27, 2011 at 1:19 pm

      Oh, satire? I guess he failed then. Must advise him to never try satire again. There are more authors who are great in satire, may be he should learn from them. But wait, he has a post about “Filipino Language” back in 2008 (not sure if that’s real). Was that satire too?

    • August 27, 2011 at 5:25 pm

      no. it’s not satire. he’s serious. why the hell did MB pull it out? and czech out this blog entry from 2008 http://james.soriano-ph.com/2008/12/filipino-as-a-second-language/

  84. jonaspinas
    August 27, 2011 at 1:17 pm

    Si Rizal nga na dalubhasa sa mahigit na dalawampung wika hindi minaliit ang kanyang sariling wika bagkus tinawag niya na malansang isda ang hindi magmahal doon. Atenista rin si Rizal.

    • Kurama
      August 29, 2011 at 1:48 am

      Kasi wala pang UP noon kaya sa Ateneo siya. Lol.

  85. August 27, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    I agree with James Soriano. I think he was being brutally honest and some Filipinos cannot take it. We are so used to sugarcoating everything, that when we come upon writers such as Mr.Soriano, we are threatened. I have experienced Filipinos who are outright ‘bastos’ to those who speak in English. They resort to mimicry, making faces and saying expletives. WHY? That only shows how UNEDUCATED they are and their unwillingness to learn. Don’t they know that English-speaking citizens raise the bar when it comes to living in the country? Why be angry at those who can speak the language? We are not, in any way, embarrassed to speak in Filipino, but it’s now 2011, and we have to be Globally competitive and the Filipino language is not recognized all over the world. That’s just the reality of it. ACCEPT IT already and MOVE ON!

    • sweet19
      August 27, 2011 at 9:27 pm

      yun na nga eh “uneducated”, bakit hindi nya naisip na meron mga “uneducated” na taong hindi kayang mag-aral o hindi nakatapos ng pag-aaral? at isa pa hindi pinag-uusapan dito na ayaw namin ng Ingles na wika. ang tintalakay dito ang pamamaliit nya sa wika ng Filipino, wika daw para sa kalye? sino ba naman matinong tao magsasabi nun?…at anu naman kung 2011 na? kakalimutan mo na ang sariling mong wika? syempre Filipino ka dapat kilalanin mo sariling bansa, cultura at wika. saang man mundo maraming Filipino. halos nga Filipino na mga empleyado makikita mo sa ibang bansa eh…

      realidad mo din na isa kang Filipino.

      • August 27, 2011 at 9:51 pm

        I did not say that we must forget our native tongue just because it’s 2011. My point was, English is becoming the norm nowadays. We are constantly urged to speak good English in any professional setting, and who puts such a high premium on this ability? YES. The Filipinos themselves. And I am also not denying the FACT that Filipinos are scattered around the world nowadays, BUT doing what exactly? The majority of them are still doing menial work. That is not meant to degrade all of us, but SWEET19, that is our reality and frankly has nothing to do with the topic at hand =)
        And I do recognize my own culture, thank you very much.

        • August 28, 2011 at 5:28 pm

          you still dont get it, do you? we all agree that knowing how to speak english puts us up on a pedestal. Enlgish gives us an advantage, pero naman, yung alimurain mo ang sarili mong language? did any of us here say anything against English? HELL NO. come on.

    • August 28, 2011 at 5:21 pm

      if the Filipino language was not internationally recognized then google wouldn’t have included it in the languages for translation in google translate. more so, Philippines itself should not be recognized as it is now confused what its language really is.

  86. Golagat
    August 27, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    Ok na sana kung sinabi nalang niya na pag-aralan ang wikang Ingles dahil nga ito ay itinuturing na universal — un lang sana.

  87. jmog13
    August 27, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    “nowhere in the article did soriano disparage or insult the poor nor did he express his elitist sentiments, all that he has done was state facts on the use of language.”

    Are you kidding me? Read between the lines. Must Soriano be very expressive, if not plainly literal, of his thoughts in order for you to say that “Oh, he did disparage or insult the poor and he did express his elitist sentiments”?

    To elucidate, Soriano wrote: “Filipino was a chore, like washing the dishes; it was not the language of learning. It was the language we used to speak to the people who washed our dishes.” These statements already evince Soriano’s insults against the poor. If rephrased, the statements of Soriano could have been like this: “If you’re poor, and you’re just my dishwasher, I can’t talk to you in English because you only know Filipino.” Or in other words, “I’m rich that’s why I have a dishwasher.”

    That’s what reading between the lines entails. That’s comprehension.

  88. lando
    August 27, 2011 at 2:10 pm

    anu kaya sasabihin ni LAO from UP kay SORIANO from ATENEO

    ” i was not informed….bakit ako?”
    =))

    • August 27, 2011 at 5:06 pm

      dapat kasi, ininform niyo siya! ininform niyo dapat na di lang Maynila at Central Luzon ang Pilipinas! bakit siya? di naman niya alam na may Ilocano, Bisaya, Bikol, at Tausug na ginagamit sa iba’t ibang kalye ng Pilipinas. di naman niya alam na sa mga ibang pampublikong aralan ay pinapractice ang “idigenization of knowledge” lalo na sa mga probinsya kasi mas may kakayahan maka-intindi ng aralin sa agham ang mga katutubong studyante don kesa sa Ingles o Tagalog. DAPAT ININFORM NIYO SIYA!

  89. August 27, 2011 at 2:11 pm

    If you control your emotions and be objective he raised some valid and interesting points, and I agree to some extent that fluency in the English language is a sign of intelligence and being “LEARNED” here in our country. Though he went overboard when he said that the Filipino society is comparable to rotting beef and stinking fish :)

    I would like to say good luck to those who are defending and trying very hard to say that the article is satirical when obviously it isn’t.

    And to his sibling who is defending him.

    “C’mon, deep down in your heart your brother (and even maybe you yourself) look down on people who only earns a fraction of your Starbucks baon everyday given by your parents :)”

    I wont be surprised if someone mugs this person :)

  90. August 27, 2011 at 2:29 pm

    Mawalang galang na po no…Growing up, I always had better grades in English than Filipino subject. I understood “adjectives” better than “pang-uri”. Now I make a living on speaking in English on a daily basis but I never thought of the Filipino Language as “language of the streets” and as “language of the underprivileged”. I read the article again kasi baka nga naman mali lang ang pagkaka-intindi ko. On the last part oh his essay, he was able to explain naman pala that in college he begun to grasp Filipino as the language of identity. But still, there were statement on on the first half that kind of offensive.

  91. August 27, 2011 at 3:15 pm

    “If it is his perception, so be it. He is just a foreign garbage dumped in the archipelago of people who know who they are and what air they take; because he who has taken into the mouth, choked and digested the food of the others and still breathed with arrogance does not belong wherever. I consider every Filipino a “Maharlika”, MAHAL NG LUMIKHA” but such term is limited only to those who know self-respect and ethical conduct.”

  92. August 27, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    He needs proper guidance….

  93. August 27, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    But if he makes a prompt action regarding this matter, he deserves a chance .

  94. August 27, 2011 at 4:38 pm

    On James Soriano, hey kid you’re a disgrace to all Filipinos. It’s a pity that you think this way. You’re still REALLY a Kid! NINCOMPOOP!

    I think this wawam and James are both one and the same.

    • Jeff
      August 28, 2011 at 4:04 am

      @ mysticgoth – “I think this wawam and James are both one and the same.” – we have the same idea. or if they are two separate individuals, probably they came from the same “prestigious school” or they are “ehem”, you know ….

  95. August 27, 2011 at 5:09 pm

    Hindi dahil nagsasalita tayo ng wikang Ingles ay tinatalikuran na natin ang wikang Filipino. Totoong mas nagagamit ang wikang Ingles kaysa sa Filipino. Pero tandaan na ito ay paraan lamang ng ating “survival” — para sa paghahanap ng trabaho, para sagutin ang mga teksbuk sa paaralan, para basahin ang recipe ng ulam, atbp — hindi para ikahiya ang sarili nating wika. Kapag ba nag-English ka ibig sabihin hindi mo mahal ang sarili mong wika? O kapag nag-Filipino ka ba ay isa kang mangmang or walang pinag-aralan? hmmmmm…

    Kung ang “perspective” ni Soriano sa pagsasalita ng Filipino ay para lang mag-utos sa mga kasambahay, o para lang maging payapa ang buhay mo sa pagsakay sa pampubkikong sasakyan, ito ay nangangahulugan lang na iniisip niya na mababang uri ang ating wika at ito ay akma lamang sa mababang uri ng antas ng pamumuhay. Sa pagkakaalam ko ang mga taong nasa ganitong uri ng hanapbuhay ay mararangal na tao.

    Maaaring sa lansangan lang madalas naririnig ang salitang Filipino, pero hindi nga ba ito rin ang salamin ng ating lipunan? Ang salitang Filipino ay hindi lamang wika. Ito ay isang kultura — bahagi ng ating pamumuhay at kasaysayan.

  96. semperfidelis
    August 27, 2011 at 5:22 pm

    All of us were taught and studied the English language. However, the article may be considered to be written irresponsibly by the writer who originated from Katipunan. Wherever you came from, may you be from Diliman, Taft, España, Morayta, Katipunan, or from wherever else, I think, it is a value, as a Filipino, to treat his own language as his own treasure of his true identity. While the writer claims to have a good command of the English language, still, he was not able to communicate his message to his readers in the way he wanted it to be. This is poor journalism. He has a message intended to his readers, but he failed to deliver the message. At this point, we may say “Aanhin mo nga ang pagiging magaling sa English, kung hindi mo naman alam kung paano ipaparating ang mensahe mo sa mga mambabasa mo?” Poor thing. I can’t believed Katipunan produced this kind of person, he seems to be a stranger to his own country. I’m just curious how proud that University is now.

  97. Xxxaynxxx
    August 27, 2011 at 6:26 pm

    Ang talino ay di nasusukat sa dami ng lengwaheng alam ng isang tao. Ang basehan ng katalinuhan ay ang bungang likha ng utak ng tao, ang likha matapos ang malalim na pagproseso ng mga bagay bagay. Di importante ang lengwahe na ginamit para isalarawan ng nalikha ( marami namang pwedeng magsalin sa lengwaheng gusto). Kaya mali kayong ang mga taong naniniwala na ” english is the language of the learned” kahit pa na ang tinutukoy nito ay sa maliit na mundo ni james lamang. Di ba mga engineers hehehe

  98. August 27, 2011 at 6:53 pm

    jmog13 :

    “nowhere in the article did soriano disparage or insult the poor nor did he express his elitist sentiments, all that he has done was state facts on the use of language.”

    Are you kidding me? Read between the lines. Must Soriano be very expressive, if not plainly literal, of his thoughts in order for you to say that “Oh, he did disparage or insult the poor and he did express his elitist sentiments”?

    To elucidate, Soriano wrote: “Filipino was a chore, like washing the dishes; it was not the language of learning. It was the language we used to speak to the people who washed our dishes.” These statements already evince Soriano’s insults against the poor. If rephrased, the statements of Soriano could have been like this: “If you’re poor, and you’re just my dishwasher, I can’t talk to you in English because you only know Filipino.” Or in other words, “I’m rich that’s why I have a dishwasher.”

    That’s what reading between the lines entails. That’s comprehension.

    the problem with reading between the lines is that you are actually not reading anyti8nhg that is written but what is in your mind.

    it also depends on how you understand things, your own interpretation and your imagination can play tricks on you.

    for example,k this how you have completely misunderstood what he has written – “filipino was a chore” meant it was something difficult for him to learn but something that he needed to learn anyway, for very practical reasons, as he needed filipino to communicate with others who speak only filipino.

    it is true that he could not talk to others in english for the simple reason that they did not understand english very well. the point of language is to communicate and you use the language that is understood by others. why would you speak filipino to a french person?

    .

    • Xxxaynxxx
      August 27, 2011 at 7:21 pm

      Yan ang problema din ng mga manunulat na pilipino, di ba ang dapat ay kung nais mong maintidihan ng ayon sa gusto mo dapat isulat mo ng “plain english”. Kahit british or american malalasahan nila ang anghang ng pinapahiwatig ng salaysay na ito. ” It was the language we used to speak to the people who washed our dishes.”. Ewan ko sayo wawan, ewan!

      • August 27, 2011 at 7:25 pm

        ” It was the language we used to speak to the people who washed our dishes.”. – that is real, accurate and the truth.

        • August 27, 2011 at 8:44 pm

          So what’s wrong with talking Filipino to someone who washed our dishes? Does that make the language inferior?

          His article appeals to me as though my native tongue is of low standards or low class.

          That is the reason why people are reacting negatively to the article.

        • August 28, 2011 at 6:10 pm

          the same language you use to speak to you mother, father, brother, sister, etc. dont be a hypocrite, i know you speak to them in Filipino. And yes, they are katulongs and drivers. And because of your parents’ hard work, they were able to send you to a prestigious school to learn the “Language of the Learned”. Now, the curse of your family has been broken. You soul has now been transformed to something else, only still trapped in a Filipino body. It’s weird though, but hey, many of you will rise to entirely wipe out the identity of the Filipino people. Cheers! your time has come! Seize it!!! MABUHAY! oops, teka, mali.

    • jmog13
      August 30, 2011 at 8:42 am

      You are not getting my point. Of course, it is a given that Soriano has a difficulty in communicating to others in English because these people weren’t raised by English-loving parents or taught in English-loving schools. His dishwasher, being a simple man of simple means, surely couldn’t communicate well with Soriano in English. And, yes, Mr. Wawam, you cannot speak Filipino with a French guy (unless the latter enrolled in a Filipino language class and aced it). But, THAT’S BESIDE THE POINT AND THAT WASN’T WHAT I WAS ARGUING HERE.

      To reiterate, you said that “nowhere in the article did [S]oriano disparage or insult the poor nor did he express his elitist sentiments, all that he has done was state facts on the use of language.” So, logically, I pointed out the very statements of Soriano that would contradict your standpoints. I did, didn’t I? You, however, raised points that are already way beyond the premise.

      And there’s nothing wrong with reading between the lines. You’d either be right or otherwise; however, that’s what reading comprehension is all about. In this case, the Soriano article isn’t Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” that needs experts to be construed. That article — despite its (so-called) reality — is plain arrogance and plain mockery of the Filipino masses.

  99. Mirasol
    August 27, 2011 at 7:10 pm

    Parang wake up call na din ‘tong article ni Mr. Soriano. Karamihan talaga sa ating mga Pinoy mas iniisip na kapag marunong mag-Ingles mas matalino. Kaya nga marami akong nakikitang mga bata na sinasanay ng mga magulang nila na magsalita ng Ingles, kahit pa nga Filipino teacher namin dati, mas sinasanay niya mag-Ingles mga anak niya kaysa matuto ng Filipino. Masakit man aminin, pero talagang walang gaanong pagpapahalaga tayong ibinibigay sa sariling wika natin. Pero hindi ko din sinasabi na tama ang isinulat ni Mr. Soriano, kasi may halong panlalait ang article niya…

  100. sweet19
    August 27, 2011 at 7:23 pm

    Hindi sukatan ang galing sa isang lingwahe ang kakayahan ng isang tao. ingles man yan o tagalog parehas yan ay may katuturan. hindi ko lang lubos maisip na bakit pati lingwahe namin mga Filipino ay dapat pa nya gawan ng ganyang atikulo na para namang walang respeto sa mga makakabasa. hindi man lang nya naisip na pati sa sarili nya ay isa syang Filipino, sabagay hindi na ako magtataka dahil pati sya ay nawalan na pagiging isang dugong Filipino. sa tingin mo ba magkakaintindihan kayo kung ang isang tao ay kakausapin mo sa isang lingwaheng hindi naman nya lubos maintindihan? parang walang silbi na ata iyon. ako ay lubos na nalungkot sa iyong pinahayag dahil kung tutuusin dapat maging matuwa ka na isa kang Filipino at imbis na ito ang talakayin mo sana sa ibang aspeto ka nalang sana, dahil mas marami pang problema sa mundo maliban dito sa pagsasalita mo ng Ingles.

  101. rosel concepcion
    August 27, 2011 at 7:25 pm

    “Ang hindi magmahal sa kanyang salita, mahigit pa sa hayop at malansang isda…”

    kalimutan mo nalang na pinoy ka at manirahan ka nalang kung saan ka nagpapaalipin..

  102. hobbes
    August 27, 2011 at 8:45 pm

    Mr. Soriano should leave the country if he thinks that speaking Filipino is a “chore” for him “to survive the outside world”. Just because he was “born with a silver spoon” and has an access to a better education, doesn’t mean he has the right to look down on our own language and our people.

  103. KEVIN
    August 27, 2011 at 8:48 pm

    nakakahiya naman siya, pati ang manila bulletin, di man nila inedit ang sinulat niya or bunasa ng maayos

    nakaktuwa to : http://migsbassig.blogspot.com/2011/08/editing-james-soriano.html

  104. August 27, 2011 at 9:18 pm

    yellowApple :

    So what’s wrong with talking Filipino to someone who washed our dishes?

    none. the article also does not say anything is wrong with it. the article just states it.

    Does that make the language inferior?

    no. the article does not say that, too.

    • Jeff
      August 28, 2011 at 3:58 am

      @ wawam – there are are no parts of the article that clearly states that there is wrong with talking in Tagalog or the language is inferior. But if you really did understood the article, that is the message being sent across by james soriano. some readers understood the article as a whole, not just some parts of it. not unless if that is the teaching in your school?

      • August 29, 2011 at 7:23 pm

        there is no message of one language being inferior or one being superior. nor is there a message of one class inferior and the other superior. what is in the article are statements of facts or observation – that filipino is the language of the street, the language used by many in their daily lives talking to ordinary people in the streets. no value judgement there.

        and english is being used in places other than the streets and with people other than ordinary folks – like in the classroom with teachers, the office and school. again no value judgement just facts.

    • August 28, 2011 at 5:10 pm

      and that’s when your ability to read between lines has to come in. come on wawam, ok ka lang? the article is all about mockery of the Filipino language. It is so sad that you fail to analyze the article as a whole to cover up his and your ass… teka lang, ayaw mong matawag na katulong no? HAHA

      • manong
        August 29, 2011 at 11:03 pm

        ano? sobra ka namang balat sibuyas.

  105. rosel concepcion
    August 27, 2011 at 9:48 pm

    mayabang ka kahit sabihin mong burgis ka sana marunong ka rin gumalang at makipagkapwa tao mahirap talga ang sobrang dunong at sobrang bilib sa sarili nakakalimot sa lahat ng bagay pati paggalang sa sarili nawawala …..ungas ka

    “Pilipino kung turan…
    Kung magsalita’y dayuhan..
    Ano pong isda yan?”
    hindi na malansang isda kundi bucha at bulok …

  106. yayabuninay
    August 27, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    Para saming mga language majors, mas mahirap aralin ang salitang tagalog kesa kung ano pa mang lenggwahe tulad ng english, french, german o kung ano pa man na banyaga. mas complex at malalim ang pilipinoi language kaya mataas ang respeto namin sa mga Filipino majors na nagaaral nito at sa mga taong nakakapagsalita ng tuwid at maayos na tagalog. ako sa sarili ko ay nahihiya kapag hindi ko alam ang tagalog translation ng isang salita kasi pakiramdam ko hindi ako pwedeng matawag na pilipino kung ganon. mas nakakapagsalita pa ako ng tuwid na english kesa tuwid na tagalog.
    ang mali sa article ni mr.soriano ay alam mong wala siyang pagsisisi sa hindi niya pagkakatuto ng maayos ng wikang pilipino.

    mas gugustuhin ko pang makasalamuha ang isang taong magaling magpilipino kesa magaling mag english. dahil madaming magaling mag english pero kokoonti lang ang magaling magtagalog.

    • August 28, 2011 at 2:36 am

      oo nga, hindi niya alam kung gaano kahirap pag aralan ang filipino, haha..yari to sa professor ko sa filipino 2 :))

  107. rosel concepcion
    August 27, 2011 at 10:06 pm

    ang ating pambansang bayani na si Dr. Jose P. Rizal ay nakaaalam ng 22 lenguwahe (Languages) ..ngunit di niya ni minsan kinalimutan at dinusta ang kanyang sariling wika
    tapos sino kang magalipusta sa aming sariling wika huy magisip-isip ka di lang isang tao ang inaalipusta mo ang buong bansang Pilipinas ….

  108. Marvz
    August 27, 2011 at 10:12 pm

    opinyon ko lang naman
    the soriano article is a reality sa isang maliit na porsyento lang ng Pilipinas.
    Siguro maximum 10% lang
    Ilan lang ba ang mayaman sa Pilipinas (na ganyan ang opinyon sa Filipino language)
    Ilan lang ba ang nasa sosyal o nasa social elite
    Ilan lang ba ang mga taga Ateneo o taga La Salle, na feeling nila mas magaling sila kasi fluent sila magsalita ng english
    Akala kasi ng mga Manilenyo , Manila is the Philippines
    Pumunta ka sa province at hindi naman ginagamit ang english sa pangaraw araw na pakikipagusap, maraming marunong magsalita at nakakintindi pero hindi naman fluent

    hindi mo kailangan maging fluent sa english para mag succeed ka sa buhay
    as long as naiintindihan ka ng kausap mo ok na yun
    ang mahalaga magaling ka sa trabaho mo

  109. George
    August 27, 2011 at 10:35 pm

    Masasabi natin na English ay ang “international language” at sa tingin ko hindi natin mapagkakaila na superior ito kung ikukumpara sa wika natin. Halata naman eh, ultimo sa paraan na natin ng pagsasalita.

    Pero kung napakaraming tao ang marunong mag-ingles sa buong mundo, bakit naman natin sasabihin na ang Filipino ay para sa mga hindi nakapag-aral, lalo na’t tayo-tayo lang ang marunong nito? Kung tutuusin nga ay hirap na tayo magsalita sa direchong Tagalog ngayon kung ikukumpara sa galing natin mag-Ingles na kinakailangan pa natin magkaroon ng mga Advance Courses para lang magsulat at magsalita sa Filipino – paanong naging hindi para sa mga “learned” ito? Walang ibang lahi ang malawak na marunong gumamit nito. May literatura ng nabuo sa salitang ito. May kultura ng umaasa sa salitang ito. May rebolusyon ng nangyari na umikot sa salitang ito. At ang nakamamangha pa rito, sa kabila ng napakalambot at napakahusay na mag-angkop na mga dila natin, ay na rito pa rin siya.

    Para sa taong tulad kong pinalaki sa dumi at ingay ng Metro Manila, nakakainsultong mabasa na ang tulad ni James Soriano ay mababa ang tingin sa mga taong nakapagtapos naman sa isang magandang unibersidad na di hamak na sing ganda at husay din naman ng kanyang Ateneo. Hindi naman kailangan pumunta pa sa Ateneo para lang matuto ng konsiderasyon. Sabi nga ni F. Sionil kay Mideo Cruz – ang isang opinyon ay may karamay na responsibilidad at pananagutan. Hindi siya mahusay na manunulat kahit na isa pang pag-uyam sa mga mayayaman at “Englishero” ang kanyang sinulat, lalo na’t marami ang hindi natuwa rito mula sa iba’t ibang patong ng panlipunang tatsulok.

    Pero naiintindihan ko rin na isa siyang biktima ng isang sistemang umaasa na sa lengguwahe ng ibang bansa dahil doon na nakatuon ang halos lahat ng pamamaraan ng buhay. Nakikita sa tao ang kahinaan ng kanyang wika, at nakikita naman sa wika ang kahinaan ng kanilang pagkatao bilang isang grupo. Hindi tayo tulad ng Japan na kayang makipagsabayan sa ibang malalaking bansa habang pinapanatili ang sariling kanila. Isa siyang biktima ng isang malubhang sakit ng kaisipang kolonyal, lito at hirap sa sarili niyang kultura. Hindi ito dahil sa gusto niya ito dati (ewan ko lang ngayon), kung hindi dahil ang mga taong pumaligid sa kanya habang siya ay lumalaki ay kinailangan, kailangan at kakailanganin maki-ayon sa agos ng pagbabago ng mundo.

    Gayunpaman, respeto at malawak na pag-unawa sa tao at sa mundo ang lengguwahe ng mga nakapag-aral. Hindi ito naninira. Hindi ito nanghuhusga. Alam ng gumagamit ng lengguwaheng ito na napakalawak ng mundo at kakapirangot lang ang parteng nakita at naranasan nila. Hindi mahalaga kung anong wika ang gamit dahil ang wika ay isang bagay na nakakapagbigay lang ng kaayusan at, sa parehong oras, indibiduwalismo sa pagitan ng mga taong gumagamit nito. Siguro, ang lahat ng ito ay ebidensiya na kulang talaga tayo sa pagpapatibay sa sarili nating wika.

  110. Jombshell
    August 27, 2011 at 10:45 pm

    Ginagalang ko ang opinyon mo Mr Soriano. Kung pwede lang naman magbigay ng suhestiyon… Sana sa dyaryo na lamang ng iyong paaralan ito nilimbag para ang mga makakabasa eh ‘yung mga taong mauunawaan ang iyong pinupunto. :) Know your audience ika nga :)

  111. August 28, 2011 at 12:51 am

    http://migsbassig.blogspot.com/2011/08/editing-james-soriano.html?spref=tw

    Someone edited james soriano’s article because it’s full of wrong grammar and wordings :p

    “Editor’s note: I hope that your education taught you the meaning of the word “asshole”, because you’ll have to forgive me for being one to you. Now go ask your mother for a new
    set of flash cards.”

    • Jeff
      August 28, 2011 at 4:28 am

      @ wawam – what can you say about this? if james soriano is good in english, his unedited version should have been posted in the manila bulletin. i bet that the editor who corrected his errors from his unedited article can speak Tagalog.

    • Dwend
      August 28, 2011 at 9:09 am

      Parehas lang naman ng ginawa ng article na ‘to sa article ni James Soriano. Nag generalize at nag assume na lahat ng tao tulad ng manunulat. Wag kayong magtatanga-tanga na hindi nangyayari yung mga sitwasyon ni James Soriano. Wag i-husga yung mga nagFifilipino? Wag din husgain yung mga nagIingles.

  112. egn
    August 28, 2011 at 12:52 am

    His a mean person because he said what everybody else is thinking. Some people are such hypocrites.

    • August 28, 2011 at 4:43 pm

      tinagalog mo na lang sana comment mo, ang iksi iksi na nga mali pa. ikaw ang ipokrito. sanay akong mag ingles pero hindi ko ikinahiya ang lenggwahe natin.

      • egn
        August 29, 2011 at 6:27 am

        It’s our own fault kung bakit ganito pananaw ng iba. Our first language is Filipino but once you go to school, the medium of instruction is English, yung mismong sistema dito sa Pilipinas ang nagpaptunay sa article ni James Soriano. If we are taught in Filipino to all our subjects in school then no one will say that English is only for educated people. It’s the same thing with finding the root cause to fix a problem. James Soriano said it in a wrong way but it’s still the truth.

  113. ron
    August 28, 2011 at 1:11 am

    Dapat kasi hindi na dapat nya sinabi na “Filipino is not the language of the learned”
    Dapat nga ipagmalaki natin ang ating wika tulad ng ibang bansa gaya ng Japan, Korea, Arabs, China bakit sila hindi naman kailangan magsalita ng English para maging “learned” na sinasabi nya …..marami sa mga kababayan natin na hindi naman naging hadlang ang ating wika upang magtagumpay sa ibang bansa….kasi ang mga Pilipino ay madaling matuto at madaling makibagay kahit sinong lahi……marami kami dito sa middle east na mga “professionals” na hindi nagiging hadlang ang ating wika….

  114. Lolita Lachica
    August 28, 2011 at 1:15 am

    Mr. James Soriano, have you tried living many, many months abroad where all you do is speak in English??? I highly suggest you do so, and I hope you meet someone either very cute or very annoying that you simply tell him/her — “ang kulit mo!”. But then, you can’t, so you just let the emotion slip away…

    I was brought up with a driver and 3 helpers, studied at CSA-Makati and DLSU-Manila… But I never share any of your sentiments. I love the Filipino language, because it is an expression of my upbringing and consciousness. So if you don’t feel at home with it why not find a new home then?

    And oh, let me tell you about the foreigners I’ve worked with who loooooooveee the rhyme and meter of the Filipino language…..

  115. yofs
    August 28, 2011 at 1:30 am

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    m@niLah, ph!lIpp!neS — eNGl!Sh Is th3 lUaNgu@Ge oWF ♥ xD ♥ leARNInG P0wz. I’vE known ThIz s!Nce b3F0Wre i coUld Goh 2 scHooL jej3jeJE ♥♥♥♥♥. aS ah toWddl3r jeJEjej3 ♥♥♥♥♥, M3H fiRst stUdeH M8rIAlz weR3 Ah Zet OF fLuash cuarDz tHat MY MoThEr Used 2 TeaCH me th3 eNgl!Sh @LphAb3t.

    MEh M0THer MAde h0m3 conDuC!V3 2 LeuARNIng enGlizh: AlL My zT0WRyb00wKS And COwl0rIN6 bo0kS wEre 1n 3NglIzh jeJEj3jezSSZzz, and Z0wh w3r3 Th3 cARtO0wnz i wa+cHEd ANd th3 Muz1c Ey l1zt3NeD ♥ xD ♥ T0w loLZ. zH3 R3Qu1r3d me t0w zp3ak eNgL!sh at h0wme. zHe even hir3d tutOrZ 2 hELp m3 leUaRn 2 ReAD and Wri+e In 3N6l!zH.

    in zcHool I lE@rn3D 2 Th!nk 1n ENglizh~~~. we uz3D ENGl!zh tow LEaRn AbouT ♥ xD ♥ numB3rs lOlZ, eQuAt!0WNS And var!uaVl3z POwz. w1th !t we l3ARn3d @b0Ut owvsErvaT1owN @nd inFereNc3 jeJeJEje ♥♥♥♥♥, THe m0oWN @nd th3 ♥ xD ♥ zT@rZ lOLz, m0ns0oWnz @ND ♥ xD ♥ PhotozYNTHEz1S loLz. WiTh It w3 leArN3d aboUT sh@p3S and ♥ xD ♥ COwLOwrZ lOLz, @b0Ut M3t3r @Nd ♥ xD ♥ rHyTHM lOlz. 1 Le@Rned aB0U+ g0D !N EnGLiZh j3JeJ3je~~~, And 3Y pRUayed 2 HIm 1n EN6lish.

    f!l!piNOw jeJ3J3je, 0n Th3 0WtH3r HanD ♥♥♥♥♥, w@Z AlW@yz tHe ‘0+H3r jeJejEJ3’ suvJeCT — AlM0wz+ @h zpec!al sUVj3ct LLyk Pe Or H0Me ♥ xD ♥ 3coWnOM1cz L0lZ, 3xcePt that iT wAs Grad3d Th3 S@mE w@y as science p0wz~~~, ♥ xD ♥ MA+H l0lZ, Rel!g!0N pOWz~~~, And ♥ xD ♥ 3n6L!sh LOlz. mY claszm8t3s aNd ! UzED 2 c0wmpl@iN @b0Ut fiLipin0W aLl Th3 ♥ xD ♥ TIm3 L0lz. FIl!p1noh waz @h cHoWrE poWZ~~~, lLYK wazH!Ng tH3 d1SH3s JEJ3jeje~~~; !t Was nowt thE l@NguaGe Of LeaRN!N6 JeJejEJe ♥♥♥♥♥. 1t WAz tH3 lanGuage we UzEd 2 zpEu@K T0W THe p30ple wh0w W@zhed 0ur dIZhEz.

    We uz3d 2 thinK l3arn!NG f!LIP!NoW w@S !mp0wR+@nT COz I+ Wu@s ♥ xD ♥ pract1c@l p0Wz: fil!pin0w w@z the L@NGu@Ge of tHE w0Rld 0uts1de THe clAssR00wm j3j3jeJE ♥♥♥♥♥. !T Wuas The lu@nguUAG3 0F tHE z+rEeTS j3jejEJ3zSsszZ: it wAz howw U SPOKe 2 tHE T1nd3rah When U wENT 2 th3 tiNduahAN, Wh@t u uSeD 2 t3lL your KaTul0ng that u h@d @n ♥ xD ♥ UT0s l0lz, @nd h0w u txted m@noWnG When u Ne3DEd “sundOW nah.”

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    1t Waz thE reAD!Ng AnD wrIt1N6 thAT WAS tEd!0Us aNd difFicult jej3j3j3. 3H zPOWke filIpInOh, but oWnly When 3y wAZ In @h diFf3REnT w0Rld LlYK THE zTreetZ oR tHe ♥ xD ♥ ProV!Nc3 L0lz; it d!d N0t cowmE Naturally 2 Me~~~. eNGl1Zh Was m0wR3 n@TuraL jEjEjEje~~~; 3y ♥ xD ♥ re@d l0Lz, wR0te and Th0Wt 1n ♥ xD ♥ EN6lisH powz. anD s0wh, In mwTz 0f The zame way th@t EH leuarned GErm@N L8r On~~~, Eh l3arnEd Filipin0H in termS 0wf eNgliZh j3jEJeJE. In TH!S wuay I ZuRv1ved F!l!Pin0w !n h1gh Sch00wl p0WZ, @Lv3!+ wIth 2oh m@ny senT3nCeS that had thE pReP0Wz1t1oN ‘Aey.’

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    • pants
      August 28, 2011 at 11:40 am

      get a life… if you have time to do this surely there are other things you can be more productive in. trolling does not earn you money anyway.

  116. August 28, 2011 at 1:33 am

    para sa lahat nang sumasang-ayon kay wawam:

    http://inez.abcruz.com/Diary/2011Aug27Sat060531

  117. the architect
    August 28, 2011 at 1:55 am

    alam mo ser, kung nde mayabang ang pagkakasulat ng artikulo ni ginoong soriano, nde naman magsisiklab ang mga saloobin nga mga mamamayan dito. kung naalala mo sa noli me tangere, napansin na ni Rizal ang mga ganyang pag uugali nga mga pilipinong nag papanggap na “banyaga” para masabing “mataas” ang kanilang pinag aralan pero alam mo, nde iyan ang basehan nga pagiging “edukado” kundi kung papano makitungo sa kapwa ang batayan nyan. kung nde kayang gumalang ni ginoong soriano, ipinapakita lang nya na maikli ang pang unawa nya–isang marka ng pagiging nde sibilisado.

  118. August 28, 2011 at 1:57 am

    Ginoong Soriano, Oo ma swerte ka dahil nakapag aral ka sa pribadong paaralan, pero hindi dahilan yon upang maliitin mo ang wikang Filipino, hindi mo lang alam kung gaano kahirap pag aralan ang filipino… KUNG SA IYO HINDI MAHALAGA ANG WIKANG FILIPINO, SA MGA TAONG HINDI NAKAPAG ARAL, MAHALAGA TO. BUTI PA MGA TAGA IBANG BANYAGA NA AA- APPRECIATE NILA ANG WIKANG PINOY, DAHIL PINAG-AARALAN NILA ANG WIKANG PINOY SA IBANG BANSA. HINDI KAGAYA MO. TANDAAN MO MAY DUGO KANG PINOY.

  119. haraya
    August 28, 2011 at 1:59 am

    wag na nating gawin pangalawang “mideo” debate ito. lahat tayo madaming “learned” opinions. Totoo naman diba madalas marami sa atin palaging nag eenglish pag ang kausap ay ang mga “sosyal at matatalino” at pag si manang at si manong ay tagalog na. Ang akin lang ngayon na nakita na natin ang ILANG mga katotohan (di ko sinabi lahat dun sa article ay totoo ok?) ay baguhin na natin ang sistema. pag ineenglish ka ng amerikano malamang englishin mo din, kung ang mga pinag aaralan ay sa ingles sige mag ingles, walang pumipigil in fact susuportahan pa kita dahil magangdang matutunan din yan, sana lang wag gawing pangalawang linggwahe ang tagalog. sa atin kasi ang linggwaheng ito eh, ito ang komunikasyon ng mga naunang pinoy sa atin. di ba’t masarap din namang isipin na pag dating ng panahon na matanda na tayong lahat yung mga apo natin matatas sa tagalog, di dahil sa mga yaya o driver nila, kundi dahil ito ang native tongue ng mga pinoy, natin. ang mali lang sa sinulat, para sakin ay ang conformist ng dating nito, na “ay oo malansang isda na ako, pero oh well, ganun talaga eh, matalino kasi ako.i am much comfortable in speaking like in english you know” wag sanang ganun, baguhin na natin! for once, tanggapin natin na kahit kinasanayan na ang pag iingles, ay mas importante at mas kailangan manguna parin ang ating sariling wika. kasi nga sarili natin to eh, ito tayo, heritage natin to. mahalin natin ang sariling atin, diba kung anong pag mamayari natin ay minamahil natin? sana ganun din tayo sa wika natin! baguhin na kung anung kaya at DAPAT baguhin, di rin nakasasalalay ay opportunidad at tagumpay sa kung anong alam lang natin, nakasalalay din ito sa kung sino tayo. At wag natin kakalimutan na pagkatapos ng lahat ng mga diskusyon na ito, at the end of the day, sa tagalog man o sa inges ko sa sabihin, PILIPINO PARIN TAYO, kahit tumira ka sa ibang bansa o magpa blood transfusion ka PINOY KA PA RIN. yun lang naman po :)

  120. August 28, 2011 at 2:26 am

    wag mo maliitin ang katulong at ang driver ninyo, kung hindi naman dahil sa kanila sino magluluto, maglalaba, maglilinis ng bahay ninyo at sino maghahatid at sundo sayo sa eskwelahan. alam natin na hindi lahat kaya makapag-aral sa pinasukan mo eskwelahan. TAPAT NAMAN KAYONG PINAGSISILBIHAN NG TAUHAN NINYO SA BAHAY NINYO, SANA SUKLIAN MO YUN NG RESPETO. KASALANAN BANG HINDI MAKAPAG ARAL? KASALANAN BANG HINDI MARUNONG MAG SALITA NG INGLES? WAG MO NALANG SANA PROBLEMAHIN ANG WIKA NATIN. PROBLEMAHIN MO NALANG KUNG PAPAANO MAWAWALA MGA KURAKOT SA GOBYERNO NATIN. HANGA AKO SAYO, DAHIL MAGALING AT MATALINO KA. KASO DI MO LANG ALAM KUNG PANO GAMITIN.

  121. Jeff
    August 28, 2011 at 3:53 am

    I will answer in english so mr. soriano and the author can understand my opinion.

    the author of this article wrote: “nowhere in the article did soriano disparage or insult the poor nor did he express his elitist sentiments, all that he has done was state facts on the use of language. it is a fact that when we are in the streets and when we talk to ordinary folks, we use filipino while when we are at work, in school oir even at home, we use english. more glaringly when we are in school, we almost always use english.”

    james soriano said that using tagalog is a “chore” when he would be speaking to their house-helps/driver. does this mean that he should not communicate with them in english? this is clearly demeaning! it is not true that you cannot speak in english to your house-helps/drivers. my cousins are well-off, they have 3 house-helps and guess what, they know how to speak in english! it might not be perfect but at least they understand and can speak the language. there are some individuals that stereo-type house-helps/drivers thinking that they don’t know how to use the english language. why not ask them or even try to talk to them first before assuming that they cannot understand you.

    If you are a learned man, the best way to prove that you are intelligent is to help the others not to belittle them. English, just like any other language is not a benchmark of intelligence. If you can actually make other people understand you even if they don’t know your language, then you have proven that you are better than them.

  122. Jimm
    August 28, 2011 at 4:12 am

    try mo magfluent na Filipino. Ewan ko lang sayo. I wouldn’t want to waste time writing how this article is ridiculously written. Kayo na bahala.

  123. August 28, 2011 at 9:12 am

    Aminin nyo na. Pag magaling sa English, sosyal. Pag Filipino, middle class. Pag Bisaya, probinsyano. Lahat ng nagsasalita laban sa author ay isa o naging malansang isda. Meron na ba kayong nasabihan na mga foreigner na mag-Tagalog sila dahil nasa Pilipinas sila? Hindi di ba todo ang effort natin para mag-English dahil yun ang language na alam nila?

  124. pants
    August 28, 2011 at 11:38 am

    this country being a filipino language-dominated society, wherein if you don’t have the money to go to school and learn english, you will surely pick-up the filipino language as your default mode of primary language, which also holds true with other countries. the poor of course will use filipino and the privilege few who attended school will use either.

    • manong
      August 29, 2011 at 10:54 pm

      tutoo yan

  125. BRB
    August 28, 2011 at 12:03 pm

    I refuse to use Filipino in talking about what this discriminating person and his stupid article.

    Why? Not because the usage of the Filipino language is reserved for the informal talks, but because the topic is not worthy to be spoken with the language and culture our ancestors have used with dignity and pride.

    and also, speaking in english is ‘formal’ because there is no ‘heart’ when we talk with that. English is a very objective language for us Filipinos. We speak Filipino about things that matters and is close to our hearts.

    • manong
      August 29, 2011 at 11:01 pm

      kaya ba ingles ang gamit mo?

  126. August 28, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    Sa Canada, Tagalog o Pilipino pa rin ang salita namin. di kami nahihiya. Sa totoo lang po ang ingles na kolehiyala o atenista accent, di po naiintindihan ng mga taga rito. Ako’y nalulungkot nang mabasa ko ang aritkulo ni Soriano. Ako’y nagtatrabaho sa software industry at ang expression pag gumagawa ka ng software – English is just another language. Di mo pwedeng i-hardcode ang English terms sa mga dialogs, menus, messages, etc.. Kelangan ang software na ginagawa mo madaling i-translate o di kaya – i-internationalize. Marami pong ma-offend kay Soriano, di lang mga Pinoy, kundi mga French, Italian, Russian, Japanese, Malay,etc, etc.

  127. August 28, 2011 at 4:13 pm

    i beg to disagree sa article that you posted. referring to the Filipino language as language of the streets coupled with remarkable expression of his profound love for the foreign language, is a modern-day act of treason. we (those who disagree with Mr. James), speak in English because we want to prove a point! That English is not just for the elites. We, the average Filipinos, are capable of speaking good English, without bashing our own language. He, on the other hand, conveyed a very condescending and demeaning reference to our national language by referring to it as the language of the poor and uneducated. I am poor, but i can speak English. The tinderas and manong drivers on the other hand did not have the chance to learn English from a good school because they just couldn’t afford it. And no, language is NOT the sole determinant of success, it is just one of many. Some Filipinos who do not speak good English make a hell of fortune out of sheer hard work. I can say I speak good English but my laziness has not brought me anywhere. I wonder why there are poor americans, australians, brits, south africans and all other native english speakers… Maybe they lack some more important quality of a successful person… because apparently, knowing how to speak English alone is not enough to bring them success.

    • egn
      August 29, 2011 at 12:21 pm

      You said it yourself, “The tinderas and manong drivers on the other hand did not have the chance to learn English from a good school because they just couldn’t afford it”, don’t you think that Mr Soriano has a point in saying that English is for educated or privileged people, we are taught in English, it’s a basic defense of Filipinos to feel better about themselves if they know how to speak English, as again, we are brought to think this way.

  128. August 28, 2011 at 4:19 pm

    Magkomento daw ako sa article ni James Soriano, sabi ng girlfriend ko.

    Bago ang lahat, kailangang mabatid na hindi mula sa “nativist” o “nationalist” na pananaw ang komentaryo ko tulad ng ibang komentaryong naglabasan. Konting sociology, history, at common sense lang, maipapakita ko na hindi bagay ang title ng column niya na “I think” sa kanyang article.

    Matingkad ang prejudice ni James sa mga “tinderas and the manongs and the katulongs of this world.” Sa bahay daw kasi nila, kinakausap niya ang kanilang katulong sa “Filipino” kung may iuutos, katulad din ng pagtetext niya kay manong (driver) kapag nagpapasundo na siya.

    Tignan kung paano niya i-distinguish ang kanyang mundo at ang mundo kung saan may nagsasalita ng Filipino.

    “We used to think learning Filipino was important because it was practical: Filipino was the language of the world outside the classroom. It was the language of the streets: it was how you spoke to the tindera when you went to the tindahan, what you used to tell your katulong that you had an utos, and how you texted manong when you needed “sundo na.”

    “These skills were required to survive in the outside world, because we are forced to relate with the tinderas and the manongs and the katulongs of this world. If we wanted to communicate to these people — or otherwise avoid being mugged on the jeepney — we needed to learn Filipino.”

    Ang pakiramdam ng batang ito, kailangan niyang mag-Filipino para maka-adjust sa mundong nag-e-English kung saan siya at home at kumportable. Sa tingin niya delikado ka kung hindi ka magfi-Filipino dahil baka mabugbog ka sa jeep. Ang dating sa kanya, napipilitan siyang lumabas sa kanyang comfort zone (ang mundong nag-e-English) at humarap sa mga taong may tendency na manakit (“these people”) kung di sila kakausapin sa Filipino (“we are forced to relate…,” “to avoid being mugged…”).

    Pero kahit ganon, ipinagmamalaki niya na magaling siya sa Filipino at unti-unti na niyang naiintindihan ang wikang ito. Nito lang lang din daw niya na-realize na ang Filipino rin ang “language of identity” niya. Siguro dahil Linggo ng Wika ngayon. Inaamin niyang malansang isda siya pero nagpapasalamat siya sa natanggap niyang edukasyon na hinubog sa kanyang “mother language” na English. Hindi daw kasi “language of the learned” ang Filipino, dahil ito ay “language of the streets.”

    Hindi man ginagamit ang Filipino sa pagtuturo ng science at math, hindi ibig sabihin nitong wala na itong potential na maging “language of the learned.” Malawak ang gamit ng English dahil ang dalawang home country ng English language (UK at USA) ang nangibabaw sa mundo sa nakalipas na 200 taon sa pamamagitan ng pananakop. Sinakop tayo ng USA at tinuruan tayo mag-Ingles. Nahubog ang ating mga ninuno bilang “little brown Americans.” Parehong ethnocentric at racist ang mga dayuhang sumakop sa atin ng matagal na panahon (Spain at USA). Hindi nila binigyan ng espasyo para umunlad ang mga wika ng mga Pilipino. Anumang bias natin para sa wikang Ingles ay dito nag-uugat.

    Ngayon, ang issue ba ay kung anong wika ang mas kanais-nais? Pakiramdam yata kasi ni James ang binary structure ng mundo niya ay ganito: English speakers > My Kind, Urban, Good, Intelligent, Successful; Filipino speakers > the Other world, Rural, Bad, Ignorant, Lowly. Ang mga prejudices na ito ay hindi nakadepende sa wika kundi sa kung paano siya pinalaki at hinubog ng kanyang mga magulang at paaralan. May mga tao na ganito rin ang bias kahit hindi sila pinalaki ng pamilyang Inglisero at mayaman (may katulong at driver). Sa kabuuan, ang mga kamaliang pinagsasabi ni James Soriano ay sintomas ng cultural problem ng isang bansang nawala ng pride dahil sa matagal na panahong inalipusta ng mga dayuhan.

    Naaalala niyo ba yung sinabi dati ni Gloria Diaz sa Ms. Universe pageant? Na English daw ang salita nila sa bahay at nagta-Tagalog lang sila kapag kinakausap ang mga katulong? Pareho lang din yun nito. Isang statement ng Pilipinong biktima ng colonial mentality. Bilang ganti siguro kaya naglabasan ang mga “Inday” jokes kung saan ini-Ingles na rin ng katulong ang kanyang amo. Nosebleed ang amo pagkatapos.

    Bilang pagtatapos, para makapang-asar lang, gusto kong tanungin si James Soriano. Yan ba ang klase ng edukasyon na ipinagpapasalamat mo? Ang edukasyong nagturo sa’yo na mangilag sa mga “tindera, katulong, manong, at mga tao sa kalye” dahil hindi sila nag-i-Ingles? Napakinggan mo na ba yung mga major speeches ng presidente natin, na alumnus ng Ateneo mo?

    At kung “learned” ka dahil sa Inglisero ka, pakisabi nga kung bakit “was” ng “was” sa mga paragraph na ‘to:

    “It was really only in university that I began to grasp Filipino in terms of language and not just dialect. Filipino was not merely a peculiar variety of language, derived and continuously borrowing from the English and Spanish alphabets; it was its own system, with its own grammar, semantics, sounds, even symbols.”

    “It was its own system?” Past tense? Bakit, patay na ba ang wikang Filipino? O mali lang ang English grammar mo? So much for your pretentious pride.

  129. August 28, 2011 at 10:06 pm

    matuto tayong umunawa sa kung anuman ang isinulat ng isang tao. hindi naman siguro siya susulat ng ganun kung wala siyang basehan. iyan ang mahirap sa ating mga pilipino kasi ang hilig pumuna para sa isang tao. bago pumuna ng isang tao ay dapat munang tingnan ang sarili kung wala bang dapat punahin.

  130. August 28, 2011 at 10:13 pm

    Para sa mga tao na mahilig pumuna ay tingnan muna ang inyong sarili kung wala bang dapat punahin. Linisin muna ang sarili bago maghangad na luminis para sa isang tao. Hayaan siya kung anuman ang kanyang sinabi sa sinulat. Opinyon niya iyon kaya dapat na respetuhin. Huwag mag react dahil kung mag react para sa kanyang sinulat ibig lang sabihin ay totoo ang laman ng sinulat niya.

    • lex
      September 25, 2011 at 9:05 pm

      bawal magreact kung ang pagkakalimbag ay naganap sa facebook o sa twitter pero kung nasa peryodiko o nababasa ng milyon-milyon na tao… kung madami ang hindi sang-ayon, iresponsable ang pagkakasulat ng manunulat.

  131. German V. Gervacio
    August 28, 2011 at 10:45 pm

    Don’t Make Away-away to Baby James Bah!

    Palaaway talaga kayong mga barumbado
    Si James naman ang pinutakti matapos ni Mideo
    Sanggano, palengkera, echosera, mga walang modo
    Huwag nang umepal maghugas na lang ng plato

    You make sundo na lang sa unico hijo ng iyong amow
    At baka naiihi o naiigit na sa klase sa Filipinow
    Iyan pa ang maging dahilan ng pagkasipa sa Areneow
    Don’t forget nga pala ang bib at teether ng senyoritow

    Inggit ka lang naman sa poging best debater
    Nasusuya sa accent niyang ala-Harry Pouter
    Porke’t nguso mo’y mas matangos pa sa ilong
    Tinirya mo na ang ating Mister Supah Dunong

    Return of the Jedi ka na lang sa inyong probinsya
    Makipagtalamitam sa mga laughing cicada
    Beso-beso to the max sa kalabaw at barakuda
    Maki-Let’s Get Loud na lang sa bayle sa plaza

    Betterer, go plant na lang Batatas edulis Choisy ( kamote ba!)
    Tumaya sa jueteng at pintakasi at ibalik ang swerti
    Maningalang-pugad uli kay Bebang, ur childhood sweetie
    Tell her: hotdog ka ba? coz ur so juicy-juicy

    Or sumuso na lang uli sa boobs ni Mebuyan
    Dance-dance para sumigla with Baybayan
    Maki-pakyu sa adbentyur ni Agyu at Lawanen
    Mag-puasa at samyuin ang magik ng Darangen

    Or mamasol ng stinky tambasakan wid cuz Felimon
    Kahit walang radar, mapa o kompas na baon
    Di ka naman lost and found sa dagat katulad ni Kapten
    Dahil gunggong na Felimon nakababasa ng bituen

    Katulad ng pagkalkula ng mga ninunong sungaw
    Kung ano’ng timpla ng lapok ang swak sa payaw
    Kung gaanong hininga ang kailangan sa pagkutaw
    Sa higanteng itim na mutya sa pekpek ng kilapsaw

    Hmmf! ur so kaka talaga! Don’+ make aw4y-aw4y 2 BabY JaMe$ bah!
    Sige ka! Sige ka! Ayan o, mukhang magka-cry-crayola nah…
    Di mo ba ma-gets yung tumutulo pang gatas as in milk sa labi niya?
    Pray na lang sa Anitos na yung milk, maging melamine-free leche flan na!

    German Villanueva Gervacio/ 24 Agosto 2011/ Iligan City

  132. August 29, 2011 at 10:05 am

    Elib ako sa majority ng mga nagkomento, talentado yung iba’t nakakagawa pa ng tula! Sana nababasa to ni James Soriano, at sana magkomento rin siya. Pasensya na siya kung sinamahan ko pa ng pang-aasar yung komento ko. May mga pagkakataon talaga na pakiramdam mo deserving ng maaanghang na kritisismo ang isang bagay. Paalala lang, yung statements ni James ang dapat tinutuligsa at hindi ang kanyang pagkatao. Kasalanan ng magulang, o ng “edukasyon” niya kung bakit siya ganyan.

    Simple lang naman ang ugat ng kontrobersyang ito: ang epekto ng COLONIAL MENTALITY. Sana nakapagbasa si James ng tungkol sa colonial mentality para naman naging makabuluhan ang isinulat niya. Palagay ko gimmick lang to ng Manila Bulletin para sa Linggo ng Wika. Naghanap siguro sila ng magsusulat ng provocative na article para mag-reflect ang mga readers nila.

    Ganumpaman, dapat siyang maging handa sa feedback ng mga mambabasa dahil ganon talaga ang buhay ng nagsusulat para sa dyaryo (at iba pang mass media platforms). Kung inaasahan niyang irerespeto ang opinyon niya, ginawa naman yon ng marami dito. Inire-respeto ang isang opinyon kapag tinira mo ito gamit ang argumentong may makabuluhan at makatotohanang basehan. Kung siniraan lang ang personalidad niya dahil sa tingin ng iba’y mali ang opinyon niya, hindi matatawag na respeto yon.

    Ngayon, yung pagpapaalala na tignan muna at linisin ang sarili bago punahin ang mali ng iba, cute ang dating. Pero dapat makita natin na hindi rin yon mainam sundin sa maraming pagkakataon. Parang ganito kasi, kung lahat tayong pumupuna kay James ay at one point or another naging biktima rin ng colonial mentality, wala tayong karapatang punahin ang isinulat niya na batbat ng colonial-mindedness. Ganon ba ang siste, Arvin? Kung ganon, dapat pala iwaksi ko muna ang lahat ng banyaga sa personalidad at lifestyle ko bago ko punahin yung isinulat ni James? At, bilang pagsunod sa lohika ni Wawam, dapat pala ang komento mo laban sa sinabi ni James ay nasa purong Filipino (Tagalog). Ironic daw kasi eh.

    Is this a case of a pot calling the kettle black? Or is this a case of a pot calling the kettle unuseful? Yung mga pulitiko natin, marami sa kanila pare-parehong corrupt. Pero kapag nagbatuhan sila ng kanya-kanyang kaso ng korapsyon, sasabihan na lang ba natin sila na, “magsitigil na kayo, pare-parehong lang kayong kurakot!” o baka mas magandang tignan ang merit ng mga kaso ng korapsyong ibinulgar nila? Si Ping Lacson, nabahiran na ng dumi ang kanyang pangalan dahil sa Dacer-Corbito case. Pero hindi ba natin siya dapat i-recognize o pasalamatan sa mga expose niya ng kalokohan ng mag-asawang Arroyo? Pipigilan ba natin si Jinggoy Estrada na magsalita tungkol sa jueteng connections ng mga Arroyo, kung sila mismo ni Erap ay nasangkot din sa jueteng? Pare-pareho lang naman silang gumawa ng ilegal di ba?

    Kapag yung teacher mo, o teacher ng anak mo, napansin mong mali ang itinuturo, magpapakadalubhasa ka ba muna bago mo tawagin ang atensyon niya at punahin ang maling turo niya? Baka kasi sabihan ka na, “ang lakas ng loob mo manita ng mali sa pagtuturo ko, bakit tapos ka ba ng BS Education?” Ganon ba dapat?

    Either may mali sa sinabi ni James, o may maling implikasyon sa mga pinagsasabi niya kaya siya inuulan ng kritisismo. Kung lahat tayo magre-reflect muna at maglilinis ng mali natin, lilipas ang napakahabang panahon bago malaman ni James na may mali sa article niya. Baka dumami na ang tulad ni James, nakatikom pa rin ang bibig natin, kasi hindi pa natatanggal ang dumi sa sarili natin. Sa totoo lang, matagal pa mawawala sa atin ang epekto ng colonial mentality at mga prejudices na kaugnay nito. Hanggang di pa nangyayari yon, palulusutin na lang ba natin ang mga statements kagaya ng kay James? O maglalakas loob tayong punahin ang mali kapag nakita natin to, regardless kung guilty tayo ng kamaliang yon?

    O baka naman ang gusto mo lang sabihin Arvin ay konting humility lang sa parte ng mga pumupuna kay James?

  133. juan
    August 29, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    pugutan ng ulo tong taong to!

  134. August 29, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    all of a sudden, posts of pinoys here are in filipino. a coincidence?

    • August 30, 2011 at 7:23 pm

      this is not a battle between English and Filipino. Igalang lang sana ang National Language, katulad ng pag galang sa ating Flag. And still you are missing that point, after a lengthy argument. Pro will never listen to anti and anti will never listen to pro. that’s how this works. in the end, nobody’s gonna win.

  135. manong
    August 29, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    daming plastik dito ha. puro mga inglisero din naman sila. plastik nyo!

  136. manong
    August 29, 2011 at 10:59 pm

    wala namang masama sa article ni soriano at tutoo lahat ang mga sinabi nya. kung walang pera ang pamilya mo, hindi ka makakapag-aral sa mga pribadong paaralan. at kung sa public school ka lang, hindi ka naman matututo ng matinong ingles. at hindi lamang basta-bastang pribadong paaralan, maski yung ibang mga pribadong paaralan, hindi rin magiling magturo ng ingles. kakaunti lang ang may kaya sa mga mamahaling pribadong paaralan.yan ang tutoo sa bansa natin. yun naman ang sinasabi ni soriano. puro lang mga balat sibuyas ang mga nag post dito o hindi naintindihan ang article.

  137. August 30, 2011 at 12:45 am

    sa mga ganitong klase ng article, nagiging righteous instantly ang marami. dun lang nagfofocus sa hindi nila nagustuhang nabasa. tapos dun sa sentences/statements na yun na gagawa ng arguments. pero kung babasahin mo naman ng may malawak na pang unawa ung essay niya, tama naman siya. actually, hindi sa tama o mali yung sinulat niya, pero yun yung observation at experience niya. at siguro naman, kung hindi tayo magpapakaplastik eh totoo namang makakarelate tayo sa points niya. karamihan sa’tin, yung ability mong mag-english ang isang batayan ng talino. yun ang mali. pero kung yun ang obserbasyon ng isang tao, hindi mali ang obserbasyon na yun. yung mismong mentality ang mali.

  138. August 30, 2011 at 6:26 pm

    wawam :

    yellowApple :
    So what’s wrong with talking Filipino to someone who washed our dishes?

    none. the article also does not say anything is wrong with it. the article just states it.

    Does that make the language inferior?

    no. the article does not say that, too.

    you don’t need to be fluent in English to understand the article. a commoner, uneducated individual can decipher what he means with his own article.

  139. manong
    August 31, 2011 at 9:48 am

    tutoo naman na ang filipino ay salita sa kalye. saan naman sa bansa na ginagamit ay ingles? mga bingi ba kayo?

    • uncle sam
      August 31, 2011 at 2:16 pm

      manong :
      tutoo naman na ang filipino ay salita sa kalye. saan naman sa bansa na ginagamit ay ingles? mga bingi ba kayo?

      ikaw po ba ay nabubulagan sa iyong nabasa? maaaring tama ka na ang Filipino ay salita sa kalye. subalit nakita, nabasa, at bukod sa lahat ay naintindihan mo ba sa tamang konteksto ang paggamit ng manunulat na nagmula sa Katipunan kung paano niya niyurakan ang wikang kinalakihan mo at ginamit pa mula ng ikaw ay musmos pa lamang? kung ikaw ay tunay na Filipino, na may malasakit sa sarili mong wika at pinapahalagahan ang iyong pagkatao bilang FIlipino, hindi mo tatawaging mga bingi ang mga tao dito, bagkus, makikita mo ang mali sa artikulong isinulat ng manunulat mula sa Katipunan. ito ay maliwanag na pambabastos, di lamang sa wika na ginagamit ng karamihan sa atin, kung hindi sa ating lahat bilang mga Filipino.

  140. Gome
    August 31, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    Sang ayon ako sa kanya. Mali kasi ang lipunan na kinalakihan natin, na bakit laging English ang gamit sa mga establishment kung puede namang Filipino?

    Ang sinasabi niya kasi, kung hindi pa sana siya nagkaron ng privilege na makapag aral e di mahihirapan siya intindihin ang mga nakasulat at naririnig nya sa mga establishment na pinpuntahan niya.

    So indirectly, he is attacking the govt with its lack of enough power to have its people enjoy the right of education. And if we or the govt really want Filipino to be like a language of its own, bakit laging English English English English ang mababasa, maririnig, at mga salita sa mga lugar na nabanggit nya sa article nya? So kailangan pala marunong ka talaga sa English or else mahihirapan ka intindihin ung mismong establishment na nasa bansa mo. Kung titignan natin ung concept kung bat nya nasabi to sa article nya, malalaman natin may mali kung bat nya nasabi yan. Mali ang drive to orient the Filipinos to have Filipino as their national language, kasi lagi na lang English, lagi na lang mahalaga na English… etc

    Basta hirap ipaliwanag pero naniniwala ako na meron siyang nais ipabatid at ipahatid, sa malalim na paraan nga lang niya ito ipinahiwatig. Parang Noli at El Fili lang yan.,. matalinghaga.

  141. Gone
    August 31, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    sorry, not mali, but to correct, “maaaring may mali sa lipunang kinalakihan natin.”

    Kung iisipin nating mabuti, MB ang nagbabasa nito- “usually” (put emphasis kasi kahit sino puede magbasa, pero may mga usual na nagbabasa) mga learned persons. Sa paraang yan masasabi niya gusto niya sabihin, hindi para ipahiya ang wikang Filipino, pero to promote something new para mabago ang orientation natin sa sariling wika, Napakadali sabihing mahal natin ang sariling wika, pero sa practicality, kahit ako nahihirapan iomit ang English, pero yung mga arabo at hapones, kaya nila dirediretsong wika nila, kasi sa ganoong paraan sila namulat. Naniniwala ako na hindi nya gusto ipahiya ang wika natin, bagkus nais lang nya ng pagbabago. Katulong, manongs, tindero, drivers, to have an education when they were young dahil un ang dapat, at ang mga learned (nkapag aral) na kahit learned na sila e mag Filipino pa rin, at ang mga pasilidad sa atin e gumamit ng sariling wika at hindi laging English.

    Hindi un sa kung ano ang sinabi nya, tungkol un sa kung bakit nya ito nasabi.

  142. Gone
    August 31, 2011 at 3:06 pm

    Naniniwala ako ito ay isang malaking hamon para sa atin, na kung mahal natin ang sariling wika, ipakita natin ito. Hindi sapat na sabihing mahal lang.

    Kung tama ako, ang miss saigon e hindi gnawang Filipino-dahil ba sa mga learned persons ang market nito (general perspective). Kasi puede namn gawing Filipino, dahil posible naman.

    Ang resume, business letter, pag interview sa mga posisyong may educational degree, sinusukat ba ang galing ng isang tao sa pkikipagtalastasan ayon sa wikang Filipino? hindi, English ang standard.

    Sa mga pasilidad na pormal at event na pormal o pormal pormalan, Filipino ba ang mga paskil n nasbabasa natin? hindi, English pa rin.

    Sinabi lang naman nya kung ano ang naobserbahan niya. Dahil kung Filipino nga lang naman ang mga salitang nababasa niya e di sana hindi lang ito pangkalye… Bakit hindi natin ilagay o isulat at ipakilala ang wikang Filipino sa mga kapormalan? Puede naman pero hindi natin gnagawa. Nasa Pilipinas naman tayo.

    Silence, keep off the grass, turn right, turn left, etc, hindi naman mga technical terms ang mga ito, pero hindi natin itranslate sa Filipino. Yan ang tingin kong dahilan bat nya ito nasabi.

    To him Filipino is pang kalye, then lets act to prove him wrong. Ang tanong may magiging pagbabago ba? Pahihintulutan ba o gagawin ba ng mga taong may kapangyarihang gawing Filipino ang mga English context na puede namn gawing Filipino? Pero kanya kanya ng pananaw, yan pananaw ko and I respect everyone’s thought.

  143. chiara
    August 31, 2011 at 5:22 pm

    People say it is a satire but when we look back and browse his former works you will see the reality of his mind. Go see for yourself.

  144. August 31, 2011 at 9:31 pm

    Tama naman siya…..Napakadaming pilipino ang hindi naman tinatangkilik ang wikang tagalog….Sa mga usapan ng mga sosyal na tao ang salitang ginagamit ay english…..sa mga conference ng mga empleyado ang gamit na salita ay english din…..Mismong mga tao na nakatira sa pilipinas hindi tinatangkilik ang salitang tagalog bagkus ay english…..Maganda rin naman kasi ang english na salita kasi kung ikaw ay nasa ibang bansa at ang kausap mga foreigner ay english naman ang usapan….Ipagmamalaki mo pa ba ang wikang tagalog gayong dito sa pilipinas halos puro korapsyon ang nangyayari sa gobyerno….Sa transaksyon sa korapsyon ang gamit na salita ay english…..Dapat dahil nasa bansang Pilipinas ang salita talaga na gamitin ay tagalog o kung anung salita para sa isang lugar….Pero hindi eh, kasi madaming pinoy ang pa english english kasi pasosyal….

  145. Kid
    August 31, 2011 at 9:43 pm

    This is James’ “sequel” to the article:

    http://mb.com.ph/node/332639/wika-bilang-gunita

    Again, for those of you who are not familiar with his writing style, here’s a summary:
    1)He has a background as a debater. In debates saying arguments is not enough: a speaker has to have IMPACT (ie. be stylistic with his/her delivery)
    2)He is supporting his arguments by “embodying” it. He’s writing from a biased perspective to pull the reader into the point of view of “elite and educated” Filipinos who are growing up with Filipino as a second language.
    3)James is conscious/aware of his biased perspective. He used it on purpose.

    *Note: Just in case you don’t know, there are “elite and educated” Filipinos who unconsciously grow up holding the perspectives the article holds.

  146. open minded
    August 31, 2011 at 11:03 pm

    Ba’t ang daming sarado ang utak at napaka babaw ng pag – iisip pero sa tingin nila’y tama sila? Tignan niyo na lang ang karamihan sa komento dito. Ang punto ni James ay maging sarkastiko sa pagsusulat ng artikulong iyan. Hindi dapat tinatanggap bilang literal na artikulo ang mga pinagsusulat niya. Isipin niyo nga, kung hindi siya nagsulat, magkakaroon ba tayo ng mga debate tungkol sa wika, pagiging makabayan, sistema ng edukasyon at marami pang iba? Mapapansin ba ang mga isyung ‘yan kung hindi dahil sa kanya? Hindi si James Soriano ang kalaban dito…..ang kalaban ay ang mga inilalantad niyang isyu. Sa totoo lang itinuturing kong bayani ang mga tulad ni James na kahit masira na ang pangalan niya at mura – murahin siya ay okay lang basta maka gawa ng maganda para sa bayan.

  147. Haney Lore
    September 1, 2011 at 11:49 pm

    Let’s give him a reprieve. He’s struggling with his Filipino in the Philippines and that’s pretty tough. It’s not arrogance but honesty that I see in his work.

  148. vla
    September 2, 2011 at 2:25 am

    Wow!!!… the arrogance…..amazing..you did it big time,Mr. Soriano. It is not totally your fault though, if it is…your upbringing? There’s a lot of smart and rich kids who are not as condescending as you are though.

  149. Jojo
    September 2, 2011 at 11:17 am

    Sa mga di nakakaalam ng pagkakaiba ng Tagalog, Pilpino at Filipino; ang pagkakaiba ng wika (language) at diyalekto (dialect):

    Tagalog ay isa sa walong “major languages” (wika) sa Pilipinas, gaya ng Kapampangan, Bisaya, Waray, Hiligaynon, Pangasinense (Panggalatok), Ilokano at Bikolano.

    Pilipino na ‘P’ ay Tagalog based + Other major languages sa Pilipinas (gaya ng Kapampangan, Bisaya, Waray, Hiligaynon, Pangasinense, Ilokano at Bikolano). So,ibig sabihin pag sinabi ko na duha, duwa, adwa, duara o dua na dalawa ang ibig sabihin sa Tagalog ay di lang ako tumutukoy sa katumbas na salita sa Bisaya, Kapampangan, Bikolano, Ilokano, etc. kundi nagsasalita din ako ng Pilipino. So pag nagsabi ako na, “ang pagkain ay lami o manyaman” ako pa rin ay nagsasalita sa Pilipino. Kaya pag may nang-alipusta sa pagsasalita ng Pilipino ay para mo na rin inalipusta ang mga nagsasalita ng Tagalog, Kapampangan, Bisaya, Waray, Hiligaynon, Pangasinense (Panggalatok), Ilokano at Bikolano.

    Filipino na ‘F’ naman ay Pilipino based + Other foreign languages (gaya ng English, Spanish, Italian, French, Japanese, Chinese, etc.). Ang Pilipino ay akin nang nabanggit sa itaas at di ko na kailangan pang i-elaborate. Ang Filipino ang ating pambansang wika na kumakatawan sa 8 major languages sa Pilipinas at Foreign languages. Ginawang Filipino ang pambansang wika sa kadahilanang may mga salita na walang katumbas na salita sa Pilipino o kaya ay may mga salitang banyaga na naging parte na ng ating pang araw-araw na pakikipagkomunikasyon. Ang “basketball”, “computer”, “cellphone”, “internet”, “world wide web”, “ventana”, “la mesa”, “croissant”, “bien venida”, etc. ay ilan lamang sa mga halibawa ng mga salitang parte na ng ating wika, mga banyagang salita pero nagkakaintindihan pa rin tayo kapag sinalita.

    Ngayon ano naman ang diyalekto o “dialect”? Ang “dialect” ay ang variation o pagkakaiba sa isang wika. Ang pagkakaibang ito ay maaaring sa punto, pagkakabaybay, vocabulary, syntax, etc.. Halimbawa nito ang Tagalog: may ibat’-ibang dialect ng Tagalog ang taga Metro Manila, Bulacan, Marinduque, Quezon, Laguna, Rizal at Batangas. Ibig sabihin nito, kahit Tagalog ang salita ng mga lugar na aking nabanggit, may pagkakaiba sa punto, pagkakabaybay, vocabulary, syntax, etc. pag hinimay mo sila.

    Example: “Ako ay yayao na.” na ibig sabihin sa mga taga Metro Manila ay “Ako ay mamamatay o papanaw na.” Pero sa mga taga Batangas, Quezon o ibang parte ng Bulacan ang ibig sabihin ay “Ako ay aalis na.”

    Kaya bago kayo makipag-debate o makipag-palitan ng kuru-kuro sa taas ay dapat malaman nyo ang kaibahan ng mga salitang aking nabanggit. Nawa’y nakatulong ang aking munting pagpapaliwanag. Mabuhay tayong lahat!

  150. anonymous
    September 2, 2011 at 11:19 am

    People are not offended by this article because “the truth hurts.” Anong “truth” yan? Base lamang yan sa karanasan ni James Soriano. At ang “truth” sa kanya ay hindi maaaring katotohanan sa karamihan.

    Most people are offended because of his statement that Filipino has the capacity to be the language of learning but it is NOT the language of the learned. Kung magdidiskusyon ba kami sa classroom gamit ang Filipino, hindi kami “learned”? Kung magdedebate ba kami gamit ang Filipino ukol sa mga kaganapan sa lipunan, hindi kami “learned”?

  151. lakasamats
    September 2, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    Manong cervesa pa… hindi ko mahabol ang tama nila. Tatlo pa siguro, kaya ko na mag ingles. Naunawan ko naman si James… nahihiya lang ako mag Ingles. Sa tingin ko ay hindi layunin ni James na makasakit ng damdamin. Higit ay hindi rin ang alipustain ang tulad ko na mahiyain mag ingles.

    Maaring iba-iba lang tayo ng “tama” kaya’t hindi natin masakyan ang isa’t-isa. Pinakamainam ay subukan nating unawain ang bawat is sa ano mang linguahe… nakapagtataka kung bakit ingles na halos lahat ang usapan sa forum na ito ay hindi pa kayo magkaunawaan. Sa aking pang unawa ay pareho kayo ng mga linguahe magkaiba lang ang “tama”.

    Pag paumanhinan ninyo… sumobra yata ang tama ko… hindi ko na kaya mag ingles.

    MABALOS.

  152. September 3, 2011 at 3:20 pm

    FILIPINO is not the language of the learned?

    Ano ba ang batayan para masabi na ikaw ay isang “learned person”? para masabi mo Mr. James Soriano that Filipino is not the language of the learned?

    para sa akin, a learned person – ay yong taong marunong makibagay makisalamuha sa lahat ng Pilipino o Amerikano, Italiano,,,at iba pa… dito sa Pilipinas marami tayong lingauhe may Ilonngo, Cebuano, Pampagenio, Panggalatok, Chabakano, Waraynon, Ilokano, Maranao, Muslim….at marami pa…Ikaw Mr. Soriano tagalog lang alam mo, Inglis? German? kadto ka sa Cebu? manunulat ka? panu ka makakarelate sa mga Cebuano kung ikaw di mo sila maintindihan? do u think makakagawa ka ng magandang report kung iinterbyuhin mo sila di ka makaintindi? baka mag hanap ka pa ng enterpreter mo?

    u are not a learned person Mr. James….hahaha punta ka sa Gensan mga tao dun marunong mag Cebuano, Ilonggo, Ilokano, mag Maranao tsaka magTagalog….makakapagsalita din ng English….ikaw ano lang alam mo ENGLISH? GERMAN? FILIPINO? saludo ako pag versatile ka sa lahat ng lingauhe kahit dito PINAS lang ….kadto ka toh lugar Maguindano….di ka kabalo salita nila duon hehehe basi ilubong ka buhi…kita mo gid isog mo toya….hehehe kuha mo?….

  153. Gone
    September 3, 2011 at 9:05 pm

    hindi gusto ni James na mag English tayo sa kalye, its the other way around, uplift the Filipino language, gamitin ang Filipino sa mga pormal at opisyal na pagkakataon.

  154. dodong
    September 4, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    truth hurts na kung truth hurts! ang punto lang dito na sarili mong wika minamaliit mo?! kawawa na nga ang mga pilipino lalo nyo pang kinawawa! ang problema sa inyo, naka pag aral lng kayo sa ateneo tingin nyo s sarili nyo ay royal blood na! sa mga na comment nyo na kyo ay privilige dahil marunong kyo mag english, parang wla kayong pinagaralan! o bka naman lahat ng mga nasa ateneo ay ganyan?! nagtatanong lang po.

    • September 6, 2011 at 12:34 pm

      soriano was not belittling filipino, he was simply describing his observation on its use, where it is used and who uses it most which are all true and real.

  155. blogusvox
    September 5, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    You missed the whole point. Most people are not reacting because “the truth hurt”. It’s the way he express his opinion that got their goat. Tactless at may kahambogan. And don’t tell me it’s devoid of elitism. Either you’re both standing on the same social stratum that you found his action normal or as I’ve said earlier – you missed the whole point.

    Hindi basta ang isang tao ay mas komportableng mag salita ng Ingles o ano mang banyagang wika ay hindi na Pilipino. Totoong ang wikang Pilipinoay kulang sa salita para gamiting “lingua franca” ng kalakal at sa iba pang sector na nagpapatakbo ng ating bansa. Subalit ang mababang pag tingin at pag alipusta sa sariling wika ay tanda ng hindi makabayan. Walang silbe kung hindi sa sarili, walang pakinabang sa pag unlad ng lipunan.

  156. September 6, 2011 at 12:32 pm

    blogusvox :

    You missed the whole point. Most people are not reacting because “the truth hurt”. It’s the way he express his opinion that got their goat. Tactless at may kahambogan. And don’t tell me it’s devoid of elitism. Either you’re both standing on the same social stratum that you found his action normal or as I’ve said earlier – you missed the whole point.

    Hindi basta ang isang tao ay mas komportableng mag salita ng Ingles o ano mang banyagang wika ay hindi na Pilipino. Totoong ang wikang Pilipinoay kulang sa salita para gamiting “lingua franca” ng kalakal at sa iba pang sector na nagpapatakbo ng ating bansa. Subalit ang mababang pag tingin at pag alipusta sa sariling wika ay tanda ng hindi makabayan. Walang silbe kung hindi sa sarili, walang pakinabang sa pag unlad ng lipunan.

    as i have written, there is nothing in what he wrote that is not true. his observations on how and who uses filipino and english are all real.

  157. September 6, 2011 at 4:06 pm

    “as i have written, there is nothing in what he wrote that is not true. his observations on how and who uses filipino and english are all real.”

    I agree to an extent. But you have to accept that he, too, wrote his essay in an ungentlemanly manner. He rubbed his words on the wrong places and his observation borders on his day-to-day experience. A myopic view if he was tackling a sensitive issue such as this especially if he claims this –

    “(Filipino) might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.”

    Latin is a dead language. But you’ll get nowhere in you’re thesis on Roman History if you don’t know the language. Same thing if you’re an aspiring doctoral student in Filipino Literature. You won’t totally understand the works of Baltazar, De Jesus, Collantes and the rest of our Filipino writers if you don’t have a complete command of the Filipino language. Now you tell me if Filipino is not a language of the learned.

    • September 6, 2011 at 9:00 pm

      blogusvox :

      “(Filipino) might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.”

      that is also correct and the reality. “learned” here is educated. and since most of the pinoy population belong to the poor, at least 85% belong to the DE socio-eco class, most pinoys are unable to get college degrees. a large majority of pinoys are not college graduates making filipino not the language of the learned.

      ask any college graduate and he/she will tell you they wrote their thesis in english and not in filipino aside from the fact that almost all the books in college are in english and that the medium of instruction in schools is english.

  158. Di nyo 'ko kilala
    September 6, 2011 at 6:31 pm

    Filipino is not the language of the learned. – Most of our reactions: “P——-g in—g yan, ibaon sa lupa, pweh”…

    Hmmm I guess some of us proved him right. Just sayin’

  159. glagla
    September 6, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    For someone who claims to have some mastery of the English language, I find it bewildering that he doesn’t know what a preposition is. Really? “Ay” (is, are in English) a preposition? Get off your bourgeoisie anti-nationalistic masturbation and hurry back to the basics.

  160. Winkiedoos
    September 6, 2011 at 8:24 pm

    The truth about the Filipino language doesn’t hurt. We know it long before Soriano wrote about it. I always thought that learning English is more practical than mastering our own language. The application of Filipino is very limited; English goes a long way. Unless everything else is translated in Filipino, our own language will not lend itself to something more other than preserving our “Wika”. If our educators have been using Filipino instead of English to teach Math or Sciences, the general population could have been more interested to learn, as it is a familiar language.

    Think about experimenting in a laboratory.

    English manual: Pour the water into the container.
    Filipino: Ibuhos ang tubig sa loob ng lalagyan.

    Note: The uninterested students wouldn’t even bother reading it in English. But let them know in Filipino, it’s natural. They do it at home. They would pour the liquid into the container.

    Oh how many lawyers and even politicians can’t speak English well!

    To state that Filipino is the language of the streets and not the language of the learned is concocting ignorance and arrogance. We are in the Philippines. If you are in other countries, the language on the streets is their own language, which is also the language of their learned. See avant-garde French & Russian writers and highly-advanced German scientists? They use their own languages with their own brilliance. Courses in Germany are actually held in German, but Germans speak good English. They are required to learn English in school and watch movies with English subtitles.

    A lot of very intelligent engineers or even lawyers hardly speak English, but they are very intelligent. There are several areas of intelligence and Linguistic is only one. So it is improper to conclude that English is the language of the learned. I know many English-speaking Filipinos who, despite years of school, can’t even understand algebra (that includes me), logic, or even common sense.

    I think the main reason why this article caused hurricane is the way the writer expressed his opinion and sentiments. The lack of tact did not only destroy his considerable points. He also merely stated the obvious without anything new to offer.

    My impression is that this article is very juvenile. It sounds like a diary entry by a 12-year old boy in his struggle to lean Language.

    “She required me to speak English at home. She even hired tutors to help me learn to read and write in English.”

    He is claiming English as his mother language when he had tutors to teach him English. You mean to teach him to speak? First of all, a mother language is the first language that a person learns after birth. Why did he need a tutor? Clearly, it is not the language that surrounds him growing up, so his parents doubled the effort for him to learn. I’m sorry. I do not mean to attack his mother. I only want to emphasize the incongruence in his article.

    Poor kid. The editors should have screened his article before publishing it. English, at times, becomes the excuse of some Filipinos that are not really as learned as they seem, to appear before the non-English speaking population that they are more erudite. The question is, are there even any substance to their arguments? Or they are only using the skill to intimidate the rest?

  161. September 6, 2011 at 10:52 pm

    in the philippines, english is the language of the judiciary, medicine, government, education, newspapers, the internet, science, mathematics, engineering, social sciences, fiction (harry potter) and even road signs and many other things in the country. that is a fact. and that is essentially what the soriano article was pointing out.

  162. September 6, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    more facts and reality:

    no value judgement here, but the sign “Huwag tatawid, nakakamatay” is written in filipino for the pedestrian who crosses the street and most who cross the street can read and understand filipino better. “do not cross, you can die” will not be as effective as many might not understand what it means.

    the tabloids is the biggest selling newspaper in the country and these are in taglish if not in filipino. most of the buyers of the tabloids belong to the DE socio eco class. however PDI is in english, it is the dominant newspaper among the ABC socio eco class.

  163. Winkiedosh
    September 7, 2011 at 2:06 am

    Hi Wawam, I appreciate your insight on the practicality and use of English in the most the eligible professions here in the country. But in my opinion, it is because we have had the whole educational system & everything else in English. It would take a complete overhaul for us to ever change it.

    I am one of those who believe that education should be in the mother tongue, as our understanding starts there. Otherwise, most students would only be passive instead of taking real interest in learning, thinking they are not capable enough as the ones who are good in English.

    Basically, what is the point of Mr. Soriano? There is some truth to it. But truth and reality are common knowledge. We are not in denial of the problems in our country.

    Now I feel sorry for the kid. He’s too young to get into this mess. But seriously, this mindset exists everywhere here in the country. Do we have great scientists? Great inventors? Agapito Flores was a poor man. There could be many resourceful Agapito Flores in the country who, like most Pinoys now, have inferiority complex because they are not so privileged to learn and understand English.

    On the good side, it is possible that J. Soriano’s article can create an opposite effect. Stating that English-speaking Filipinos have better privileges than those who are not may become the catalyst for change. Maybe change everything to Filipino out of that. :) Thank you Mr. Soriano.

  164. Stella Canete Balucas
    September 7, 2011 at 9:48 am

    Ngayon na alam mo na ang kakulangan mo sa wika, lalo na sa KULTURANG FILIPINO, humabol ka sa pag-aaral kung paano maging tunay na Filipino. Tingnan mo ang sarili mo sa salamin… HINDI KA PUTI.

  165. September 7, 2011 at 3:24 pm

    “a large majority of pinoys are not college graduates making filipino not the language of the learned.”

    We’re not on the same playing field here. My argument is about Filipino per se, regardless who or how many speaks it, as a language of the learned or as you prefer “educated”. You, on the other hand, based it on the number of Filipino speakers without college degree, hence you waved aside as “uneducated”, and therefore Mr. Soriano and you concluded Filipino as not the language of the learned.

    If this is how you put it, let me show you where your logic breaks down. Apply your train of thought to another country, say, the US of A. Only 27% of its total population have college diploma. Does that make the majority of its people “uneducated”? Does that make English not the language of the learned?

    But then you’ll say “it’s a case to case basis”, it doesn’t apply because I’m comparing it to a first world country. Exactly! Because Mr. Soriano and you based your conclusion on your observation of a portion of the entire grid. Look at the big picture and not just the bastardized Filipino dialect spoken by Manang, Manong and the “yosi” vendor on the sidewalk.

    I once compose a dissertation in Filipino, making a literary analysis of an OFW issue a year ago. Readers noticed and praise more the way I wrote my argument in that language. See for your self. Try writing in Filipino using the proper “balarila” then tell me if Filipino is not the language of the learned.

    • September 7, 2011 at 8:42 pm

      ^^^ have you ever read a scientific paper written in filipino? laws in the country are written in english, legal documents and court hearings are in english. medical diagnosis are in english as well. has anyone written a college thesis in filipino? have you read a novel in filipino lately? english is the language used in business. in the country. even the call centers require engllish.

      all of the above are written in english in the US as well.

      • lex
        September 25, 2011 at 9:20 pm

        try mu wawam magresearch sa librarary ng UP… very welcome ka dun… ang daming thesis na nakasulat sa Fililpino dun.

  166. jojojo
    September 7, 2011 at 3:52 pm

    Ang aarte ninyo. Gumawa na lang kayo ng tama nang mabawasan ang balasubas sa pinas. Laki laki ng tax ko punyeta!

  167. blogusvox
    September 8, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    Tell me. Do you actually understand my argument? You haven’t put forward any substantial reasoning to counter or address my statements except to parrot facts and figures we already knew long before Soriano wrote his “eye-opener”.

    But perhaps the fault lies on me. I miss calculated your capacity. I shouldn’t discuss controversial issues such as this with someone ill prepared to defend his views. It makes me look like a bully and therefore regretted I even posted my opinion here. What a waste.

  168. cynthia solis
    September 10, 2011 at 1:05 pm

    everything that soriano said is true. i also agree, truth hurts.

  169. September 10, 2011 at 4:12 pm

    Totally agree with blogusvox-sept 5 reply.

  170. dsoker
    September 11, 2011 at 11:59 pm

    “even the call centers require engllish.”

    HAHAHA! Natawa talaga ako nang todo dun ah! HAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Wala ka sigurong alam sa BPO kaya mo nasabi ‘yon. Sabi pa sa bisaya, “ALANGAN?!”… hahahaha!!!!! Anyway, wag kang masyadong ma-offend sa pagtawa ko ha, kasi, alam mo na, THE TRUTH HURTS. hahahahaha!

  171. dsoker
    September 12, 2011 at 12:10 am

    Ang masasabi ko lang sa article na ‘yon ni James Soriano, IT’S AN EPIC FAIL. He didn’t get the message across to the people for whom his message is intended. Sayang lang yung pagportray niya sa article niya bilang isang BOBO AT TANGANG ATEN… er, ang ibig kong sabihin…ELITISTA, hindi niya kasi naipaintende sa karamihan ng nagbabasa ang ibig niyang sabihin. KAYA SIGURO, SA MGA BROADSHEETS, MAS MARAMING NAGBABASA NG INQUIRER KESA MB. hahahaha!!!! Huwag sanang mainsulto si Mr. Soriano sa sinulat kong ito kasi naman, dapat alam na rin niya, na THE TRUTH HURTS. hahahaha!

  172. dsoker
    September 12, 2011 at 12:31 am

    wawam (@wawam) :
    more facts and reality:
    no value judgement here, but the sign “Huwag tatawid, nakakamatay” is written in filipino for the pedestrian who crosses the street and most who cross the street can read and understand filipino better. “do not cross, you can die” will not be as effective as many might not understand what it means.
    the tabloids is the biggest selling newspaper in the country and these are in taglish if not in filipino. most of the buyers of the tabloids belong to the DE socio eco class. however PDI is in english, it is the dominant newspaper among the ABC socio eco class.

    Ano naman ang masasabi mo sa street sign na “PED XING”? HAHAHAHA!!!!

  173. dsoker
    September 12, 2011 at 1:50 am

    Winkiedoos :
    The truth about the Filipino language doesn’t hurt. We know it long before Soriano wrote about it. I always thought that learning English is more practical than mastering our own language. The application of Filipino is very limited; English goes a long way. Unless everything else is translated in Filipino, our own language will not lend itself to something more other than preserving our “Wika”. If our educators have been using Filipino instead of English to teach Math or Sciences, the general population could have been more interested to learn, as it is a familiar language.

    Think about experimenting in a laboratory.
    English manual: Pour the water into the container.
    Filipino: Ibuhos ang tubig sa loob ng lalagyan.
    Note: The uninterested students wouldn’t even bother reading it in English. But let them know in Filipino, it’s natural. They do it at home. They would pour the liquid into the container.
    Oh how many lawyers and even politicians can’t speak English well!
    To state that Filipino is the language of the streets and not the language of the learned is concocting ignorance and arrogance. We are in the Philippines. If you are in other countries, the language on the streets is their own language, which is also the language of their learned. See avant-garde French & Russian writers and highly-advanced German scientists? They use their own languages with their own brilliance. Courses in Germany are actually held in German, but Germans speak good English. They are required to learn English in school and watch movies with English subtitles.
    A lot of very intelligent engineers or even lawyers hardly speak English, but they are very intelligent. There are several areas of intelligence and Linguistic is only one. So it is improper to conclude that English is the language of the learned. I know many English-speaking Filipinos who, despite years of school, can’t even understand algebra (that includes me), logic, or even common sense.
    I think the main reason why this article caused hurricane is the way the writer expressed his opinion and sentiments. The lack of tact did not only destroy his considerable points. He also merely stated the obvious without anything new to offer.
    My impression is that this article is very juvenile. It sounds like a diary entry by a 12-year old boy in his struggle to lean Language.
    “She required me to speak English at home. She even hired tutors to help me learn to read and write in English.”
    He is claiming English as his mother language when he had tutors to teach him English. You mean to teach him to speak? First of all, a mother language is the first language that a person learns after birth. Why did he need a tutor? Clearly, it is not the language that surrounds him growing up, so his parents doubled the effort for him to learn. I’m sorry. I do not mean to attack his mother. I only want to emphasize the incongruence in his article.
    Poor kid. The editors should have screened his article before publishing it. English, at times, becomes the excuse of some Filipinos that are not really as learned as they seem, to appear before the non-English speaking population that they are more erudite. The question is, are there even any substance to their arguments? Or they are only using the skill to intimidate the rest?

    Very well said. SALUDO AKO SA’YO PRE!

  174. DJ Mo
    September 12, 2011 at 10:28 pm

    English is the language of the learned? Oh c’mon not because youre speaking in english doesnt mean youre intelligent. alam ni Ogie Diaz yan ;)

  175. gatas at kape
    September 13, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    Binasa ko ang isinulat ni G. James Soriano. Ang kapansin-pansing kamalian na kanyang nagawa sa kanyang sulatin ay nang tawagin niyang “preposition” ang “linking verb” na “ay”. Maliban dito, lahat ng kanyang sinulat kung pagbabatayan ang teknikalidad ng gramatika ay maituturing na tama o katanggap-tanggap. Walang dapat pagtalunan pa sa iba pang mga bagay na sinasabi ninyong mali. Dapat siyang palakpakan dahil natutunan nya ng madali ang wikang banyaga para sa maraming Pilipino.

    Ang layuning nakapaloob sa kanyang sulatin ay malinaw. Hindi niya itinuturing na wika ng mga natuto ang wikang Filipino. Itinuring niyang ito ay wika ng mga tao sa kalye, ng mga mabababang uri ng tao (na nagpapatakbo ng kanyang mala-senyoritong buhay). Ito ay isang ganap na paglapastangan sa wika ng bansang nagbigay sa kanya ng tahanan. Ito ay malinaw na pagyurak sa pagkatao ng maraming Pilipino na nagmamahal sa pambansang wika. Isa siyang walang utang na loob sa bayang kanyang sinilangan. Walang bansa kung walang wika. Kaya paano mo maihihiwalay ang wika sa isang bansa? ang paglapastangan sa wika ay paglapastangan sa Pilipinas.

    Tama ang mag-aral tayo ng Inggles. Ito ay magagamit natin sa araw-araw, sa pagtatrabaho, sa komersyo, sa lahat ng larangan ng buhay. Ngunit dapat nating isipin na hindi lahat ay kayang isalba ng wikang Inggles. Maaaring natuto ka at gamay mo ang wikang iyong ipinagmamalaki, ngunit hindi mo iyan magagamit sa dakong hindi kilala ang wikang iyan, kaya anung halakhak ko lang kung mapunta ka sa mga dakong hindi kinikilala ang wikang iyong nakagisnan. baka doo’y pulutin ka sa kangkungan at sumpain mo na ang ipinagmamalaki mong wikang hiram.

    Minsan gusto nating ipagmalaki natin na magaling tayo sa ganito, sa ganire, sa ganun.. Pero huwag mong masyadong ipagmalaki na magaling ka sa wikang Inggles na ang kapalit ay ang pagyurak mo sa Filipino. Hindi ito ang inaasahan sa isang tulad mong lumaki sa PIlipinas.

    Isa ka sa mga tinawag ng ating bayani, na sumisingaw ang kabulukan mula sa balat mong sunog sa araw, kasing-amoy ng malansang isda.

    at sa lahat ng mga nag-komento tungkol sa teknikalidad ng kanyang sulatin, wag niyo na iyang bigyang-pansin. Hindi ito ang dapat pag-diskusyunan.. Ang dapat nating pag-usapan mga kaibigan, ay kung paano natin mababago ang ganitong uri ng isipan na kumakalat na parang kanser sa ating lipunan. Saan na patungo ang mga kabataan kung ganitong uring isipan ang itinatanim ng mga magulang? Marami akong kilala ngayon na lumaki sa isang maykayang pamilya na hindi nakakaintindi ng tagalog, samantalang sinasabi ng ilong nya na isa siyang taong dapat magsalita ng tagalog. ikinakahiya na ba natin ang sarili nating wika? nakikita ko na ang kahihinatnan ng ating bayan, umaandap-andap na ang dati’y nagniningas na mga pusong makabayan. napapalitan na ng kulturang hilaw, na hindi pwedeng tawaging “atin” sapagkat yao’y hiram.. hindi pa ba tayo nagtanda? ipinaglaban natin ang ating lupa mula sa mga banyaga, pero heto tayo’t pilit na yumayakap sa kanila? walang masama kung matutunan natin ang kanilang wika, kultura, gawi, at iba pa… ngunit huwag sana nating kalimutan at KAMUHIAN, higit sa lahat, YURAKAN ang ating pagkatao bilang mga Pilipino.

    – wag na tayong mag-away away… umupo tayo, mag-kape.. mag-usap.. ukol sa ikaaayos ng bayan..

  176. bw
    September 13, 2011 at 7:39 pm

    Just I expected. An Atenean defending the moronic article of a fellow Atenean. Since when was it ever acceptable to say in public that one wants to have sex with his mother or sister ?? This is the same sickening attitude Soriano displayed – the denigration of his national language, the very soul of his country, the way people communicate and empathize with each other. Suffice to say that some things are better left unsaid. Stop justifying Soriano because you’re telling people you’re like him.

    On another note, I doubt if James Soriano, Mr Inglesero is as proficient with the English language he claims to be. Here’s 5 words I like your best debater ek ek friend to respond to the meanings. Tell me if he can do it in 10 minutes. If not , he’s just a wannabe jerk how knows nothing but berate those unfortunate ones who are not materially blessed like him.

    TRUANDAL
    DULOSIS
    NITTINESS
    JARGOGLE
    PHILOCOMAL
    SCELESTIOUS

  177. Zandra
    September 14, 2011 at 8:20 pm

    Kung pakaiisipin natin, maaring sinadya ni James Soriano ang pagsulat nang ganitong artikulo dahil alam niyang magkakaroon nang ganitong reaksyon ang mga Filipino. Basahin natin ang kanyang sinulat at unawain ito ng may bukas na isip.

    “But perhaps this is not so bad in a society of rotten beef and stinking fish. For while Filipino may be the language of identity, it is the language of the streets. It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.”

    Isa ito sa mga talata na kung saan maaring isipin natin na satire nga ang kanyang ginawa pero dahil sa masyado tayong natamaan kaya hindi nakakatawa. Dapat bago tayo magkomento, pakaisipin na muna natin ang ninanais ng manunulat. Kung tutuusin kasi, kasalanan din naman nating mga Filipino dahil sa sobrang pagnanais natin na matuto ng Ingles para lamang di masabihan ng jologs.

  178. bw
    September 15, 2011 at 10:42 pm

    We have to see the message James Soriano wants to convey in his article and this is highlighted by his last line, separated from the rest of the paragraphs :

    “So I have my education to thank for making English my mother language ”

    Para sa aking maliwanag na maliwanag ang mensaheng pinahahayag ng taong ito and that is the message of KAYABANGAN, of being an EDUCATED ELITE. Would I dare put English over my native language or motivate myslef to “unlearn” my native language because it is “uncool” and the language of the street ?

    Of course, alam natin that the learning institutions in the country were instituted by the Spaniards and the Americans – ano ang magagawa natin ? It is extremely difficult to overhaul it.

  179. September 15, 2011 at 11:35 pm

    Yes, inept bureaucrats and misguided patriots are joining us in our seemingly inutile national search for our real and putative mother tongue? Which is Tagalog-Pilipino-Filipino, really, what exactly? But why do we keep ‘shooting’ down the messengers/journalists in the Philippines? The article’s message again please.
    If the James Soriano’s essay was written in Filipino, would you care the same? No one would dare write one in a land called world’s hotspot for journalists but he also wrote, ” I am Jules Winnfield.” Rightly so, because he is now a terribly pulped language icon in a culturally-challenged Philippines, known for exposing to the world the James Soriano Syndrome of this generation, like it or not. Ballbreakers…pioneers, rebels, and reactionaries. Admired. Loathed. And worshipped by some a la Da Vinci’s works.
    Filipinos avoid/void that habit of spending precious ‘spicy’ evenings in front of the boob tube instead makihalubilo at makipagtalastasan bilang isang pamilyang Pinoy na dapat may kuwento at kuwenta ang maghapon na mahalaga sa ating paglago bilang isang maunlad na pamayanan. Kadalasan daw na makulay noon ang buhay ng mga Pinoy dahil buo pa ang diwa ng bayanihan sa bahay at buhay; sa dapit-hapon may kundiman, harana, at balagtasan paminsan-minsan. Sa ngayon, ayaw lang yata ni Kenkoy matukoy ang mga suliranin sa pambansang wika. Si G.Quezon kaya bakit naka-amerikana din at nanagalog lagi? Ang mga Lakan daw ng Wika ng bansang Pilipinas bakit ang mga likha, katha, ay sa Ingles din ang pagkaka-akda, ‘ambot kay Ambeth?Oh c’mon, bakit ka naka-‘overcoat’ baby at kailan ka huling nag-Filipino lakan sa iyong masterpiece? Pakitagalog na nga lang po ang mga foreign at local bestsellers ngayon para man lang sa natuto pa lang magbasa na pag-asa ng bayan at wikang Filipino. Ano ang saysay ng hanggang sanaysay lang lahat? Mabuti pa ang Metro Manila Film Festival, Metro Manila daw pero buong Pilipinas ang inaabot ng mga pelikula nila isang buong linggo pa, samantala itong Buwan ng Wika daw paano pinagdidiriwang? Hindi ba dapat pambansang pagdiriwang ito na inihahain ang huling araw sa dambana ng sumulat ng “Huling Paalam”?. Ikaw kasi James, parang ‘di mo alam ang awiting, “…said I love you but I lied”, hope this reminds you of young Rizal’s life anguish and horror about telling the truth to girls and country.
    Mawalang-galang na nga po, makapanood na nga ng concert ng “Mga Pataning Itim ang Mata” mamaya at ano naman kaya ang tagalog ng “Pussycat Dolls” magiling daw ang mga ito? Ano ulit apo?, alin ang magaling? Bukang-liwayway na po Lolo Pepe Rizal.

  180. Jsa
    September 15, 2011 at 11:36 pm

    Let’s just get real and be practical. Native languages have no future!

    • bw
      September 17, 2011 at 5:02 am

      What future are we talking about – future tense ? :) If you’re talking about a professional future – sure, but why dump your native language over a foreign language ? Why can’t you be bilingual and fluent with both languages ? Why do you have to put down one in favor of the other ? If you are that proficient with English, why can’t you keep it under you hat instead of bragging to the world that you are more superior than others ?

  181. September 15, 2011 at 11:51 pm

    Yes, inept bureaucrats and misguided patriots are joining us in our seemingly inutile national search for our real and putative mother tongue? Which is Tagalog-Pilipino-Filipino, really, what exactly? But why do we keep ‘shooting’ down the messengers/journalists in the Philippines? The article’s message again please.
    If the James Soriano’s essay was written in Filipino, would you care the same? No one would dare write one in a land called world’s hotspot for journalists but he also wrote, ” I am Jules Winnfield.” Rightly so, because he is now a terribly pulped language icon in a culturally-challenged Philippines, known for exposing to the world the James Soriano Syndrome of this generation, like it or not. Ballbreakers…pioneers, rebels, and reactionaries. Admired. Loathed. And worshipped by some a la Da Vinci’s works.
    Filipinos avoid/void that habit of spending precious ‘spicy’ evenings in front of the boob tube instead makihalubilo at makipagtalastasan bilang isang pamilyang Pinoy na dapat may kuwento at kuwenta ang maghapon na mahalaga sa ating paglago bilang isang maunlad na pamayanan. Kadalasan daw na makulay noon ang buhay ng mga Pinoy dahil buo pa ang diwa ng bayanihan sa bahay at buhay; sa dapit-hapon may kundiman, harana, at balagtasan paminsan-minsan. Sa ngayon, ayaw lang yata ni Kenkoy matukoy ang mga suliranin sa pambansang wika. Si G.Quezon kaya bakit naka-amerikana din at nanagalog lagi? Ang mga Lakan daw ng Wika ng bansang Pilipinas bakit ang mga likha, katha, ay sa Ingles din ang pagkaka-akda, ‘ambot kay Ambeth?Oh c’mon, bakit ka naka-‘overcoat’ baby at kailan ka huling nag-Filipino lakan sa iyong masterpiece?
    Pakitagalog na nga lang po ang mga foreign at local bestsellers ngayon para man lang sa natuto pa lang magbasa na pag-asa ng bayan at wikang Filipino. Ano ang saysay ng hanggang sanaysay lang lahat?
    Mabuti pa ang Metro Manila Film Festival, Metro Manila daw pero buong Pilipinas ang inaabot ng mga pelikula nila isang buong linggo pa, samantala itong Buwan ng Wika daw paano pinagdidiriwang? Hindi ba dapat pambansang pagdiriwang ito na inihahain ang huling araw sa dambana ng sumulat ng “Huling Paalam”?. Ikaw kasi James, parang ‘di mo alam ang awiting, “…said I love you but I lied”, hope this reminds you of young Rizal’s life anguish and horror about telling the truth to girls and country.
    Mawalang-galang na nga po, makapanood na nga ng concert ng “Mga Pataning Itim ang Mata” mamaya at ano naman kaya ang tagalog ng “Pussycat Dolls”?, magiling daw po ang mga ito? Ano ulit apo?, alin ang magaling? Bukang-liwayway na po Lolo Pepe Rizal.

  182. Majuro
    September 17, 2011 at 8:40 am

    What James Soriano wrote is true, but with a hint of elitism in his words. Besides that, the only people REALLY, REALLY offended with this article are those first language speakers of Filipino or let’s just say for technical purposes, Tagalog. Am I right or am i right? =)

    I’m not the best speaker of the national language. In fact, if I talk in Filipino, people would notice that I have that Bisayan accent. Personally, I’m not offended because my first language is Cebuano. In fact, there are more native tongue speakers of the Visayan language. English comes second to that. Heck, I speak better Ilonggo than Filipino.

    Let’s not blame one person stating a fact that in the Philippines, English IS the language of learning. Before anyone jumps into conclusions, I’m not in favor how James has written his ‘eye-opener’ article. In fact, I think he’s an ass. He’s got his head up all over it. If ever someone meets him in their travels in the metro, punch him in the face for me. Cheers.

  183. Diplomat
    September 18, 2011 at 5:47 pm

    Ang masasabi ko lang, napakaliit ng mundong kinalakihan ni Soriano, tsk tsk

  184. waistline32
    September 20, 2011 at 2:22 am

    Monkey See, Monkey Do

    Kahit anong sabihin mong elite ka, manggagaya ka pa rin sa iba. Ika nga nila sa Inggles “Monkey See, Monkey Do” Kapag wala kang pagkilala sa sarili mo, unggoy ka lang. Kung di mo kayang ipagbuti ang sarili mo, nakapisan at naka-asa ka lang sa iba.

    Kahit anong idamit mo at ibaluktot ang dila mo Pilipino ka pa rin. Kahit ihiwalay mo ang sarili mo sa 80% na mahihirap na Pilipino, wala kang magagawa: isa ka pa rin sa kanila. You are never a cut above the rest of what you are part of. Dahil walang sanga na ligtas sa pagkabulok ng buong puno. Kapag tayo bumagsak, wala kang ligtas, damay ka. Kahit gaano kataas ang sweldo mo sa multi-national corporation, olats din yun pag walang halaga ang piso.

    Kahit ako, bilang guro ng English sa call center, nalulungkot ako na nakapisan ako sa negosyo ng mga dayuhan. Hindi nawawala ang pagnanais kong magkaroon ng sarili kong negosyo. Mahirap dahil sa ipinilit sating kulturang anti-Pinoy pero walang mangyayari kung wala akong ikikilos.

    Salamat sa article na to. Nagising ang marami. Totoo naman kasi na mababa ang tingin ng marami sa Filipino at sa mga nagsasalita nito. Tayo mismo ang bumababoy sa sarili natin. Kailangan nating ayusin, kaparehas ng pag-ayos natin sa sarili natin at sa bansa natin.

    Puro tayo salita. Ano nga ba sabi ni Karl Marx? “The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.”

  185. waistline32
    September 20, 2011 at 2:32 am

    O English naman para “in” ako. Hehehe!

    And furthermore (naks!) Yes, Filipino is the language of the streets.

    We are proud of that because the streets, the factories, the fields are where nations are built. It is the people who move a nation.

    The elites may have control of the status quo. But once the people become aware of the power of their hands, heart and minds… watch out!

    Ang mga elite, takot sila sa taumbayang naghahanap-buhay… kaya nila minamaliit.

  186. waistline32
    September 20, 2011 at 2:36 am

    One more time, sorry kung makulit ako at parang masyado akong Marxist.

    “One of the most difficult tasks confronting philosophers is to descend from the world of thought to the actual world. Language is the immediate actuality of thought. Just as philosophers have given thought an independent existence, so they were bound to make language into an independent realm.” – K.M.

  187. Odette
    September 21, 2011 at 1:57 am

    Si ihong James Soriano ay nasa “high school” pa lang so patawarin niyo po ang pinili niyang mga salita. Ang nanay niya ay naglagay sa isip niya mula sa pagkabata na ang wikang Ingles ay dapat niyang pagtuunan ng pansin. Marami pa siyang bigas o tinapay na kailangan kainin at kailangan niya pang lumabas sa kanyang lobo at buksan ang kanyang pag-iisip. May mga katotohanan naman po siyang nabanggit sa nangyayari sa ating mga Pilipino. At hindi lang wika ang kailangan sisihin dito. Tayo ay masyadong nagiging makamundo at gusto lang nating lahat makalamang sa isa’t isa. Gusto lang natin maramdaman na masmatalino, masmaganda, masmayaman, masmataas tayo sa kapwa natin. Pagkumbaba ang lunas dito. Magiging mapagkumbaba lang tayo kung ang paniniwala natin ay likha lamang tayong lahat ng isang makapangyarihang Diyos na parepareho lang ang ating buong katauhan sa kanyang mga mata.

  188. Gravy
    September 21, 2011 at 6:26 pm

    I am a mother of a teenage son and a toddler daughter. James Soriano’s piece strikes a chord as I am faced with a dilemma on what language to teach my toddler. While I was raising my first-born, it didn’t occur to me at all about what language to use The whole family spoke in Filipino. My husband is a Filipino teacher, we chose to stay here in the Philippines despite opportunities to immigrate, we imbued love of country to our son.

    In high school my son reaped academic awards, always placed in the top 15 of the batch, and was a leader to his peers. He joined a lot of activities and is comfortable in public speaking, even joining a debate club, albeit his difficulty in using the English language. However, his struggle with the English language caught up with him and affected his confidence in using the language. I surmise this was what caused him to drop from the debating team and another activity involving public speaking. We have successfully raised a well-rounded, competitive high achiever. He has the confidence, and this should have taken him far, but the reality is, his inability to speak English fluently crippled him, and I find it unfair.

    But that’s reality, not only in school, but more so in the real world of his chosen profession (business) where he wants to dabble now that he is in college.

    Because of this concern, I asked my sister-in-law who is a preschool teacher in an exclusive school how the kids in exclusive schools are able to speak fluent English, and she shared with me that the families use English exclusively in their homes, and this came to me as somewhat of a shock. I myself am not comfortable speaking in English, but I find it a “forced responsibility, slash, obligation” that I teach my toddler English as her primary language if I do not want her to feel limited in enjoying her interests and reaching her goals later in life, as what happened to her brother.

    It’s a good thing though that there’s a trend these days to raise a bilingual or even a trilingual child, as advocated by child psychologists, as this supposedly helps babies’ brains to have the capacity to learn more. I won’t go into the theory of that, but the implication of that in my household is for English, as well as Filipino, to be taught to the baby. If there was no bilingual movement, I doubt that I’d be teaching Filipino. I’m sorry, but I’m just being honest. The family members speak to the baby in English and the househelp are delegated to speak to my baby in Filipino. It’s not because “FIlipino is the language of the unlearned,” but perhaps because it is a matter of convenience that between the family members and the househelp, the family members are more equipped to communicate in English. But we all speak to each other in Filipino.

    True enough, my daughter is quickly picking up and understands both languages, but as expected, she’s speaking more in English. When we ask her to say “ball” and she says “bula,” I am proud that she knows both languages. But then deep inside, knowing our own limitations in speaking English, I know we can only go so far and we will eventually default back to using Filipino. And it’s hard to cast away the apprehension that we will inadvertently be “depriving” my daughter of her ability to reach her full potential without a full grasp of the English language. If one can be honest to himself, just by looking around, it’s not enough to know how to speak in English, you have to speak it fluently and naturally. You have to think in English. And you have to start young and have the language ingrained in your brains, and it’s the mothers that do this, and I can’t blame them.

    I thank James Soriano’s BRAVE and HONEST characterization of what the Filipino language’s role is in his life, and I must say it is an accurate reflection of not just the current, but what has always been, I believe, the state of our national language. It is a wake-up call to all of us. But with mothers like me who would teach English as a primary language only because they want the best for their children, in this very competitive world and with not much support from the government to change the system to benefit Filipino speakers as compared with English speakers, this “illness” will continue to persist, as the mothers will just pass it on to the next generations, if they do not wish their children to be put to a disadvantage.

    I had the opportunity to immigrate, but I chose not to. I love my country, and I have imbued that love of country to my son. My husband is a Filipino teacher, and is fully equipped to teach my baby very good Filipino. I just find it ironic that we, Filipinos who chose to stay behind, would find ourselves at a disadvantage to use our beloved Filipino language in our beloved country, the Philippines. James Soriano has a message, as painful as it may seem, and I hope critics would surpass the initial shock of the truth and actually get their minds together for a more useful and meaningful purpose, and that is to constructively help address and solve the problem.

  189. tear_here
    September 23, 2011 at 1:22 pm

    Sa Pilipinas, makapagsalita ka lang ng English mayabang ka na. it is true that Filipino is the language of the streets. bakit, makakapag_english ka ba sa mga tao sa kalsada. sasabihan ka lang ng hambog o mayabang. i don’t get the reason for their violent reactions.

    • bw
      September 24, 2011 at 7:54 pm

      the violent reaction is simple, that this humbug Soriano has the audacity to tell the world that he is so thankful that his mother tongue English and not Pilipino. Look at his last line. I bet ang isang patriotic na ina like you would feel offended. Imagine pag lumaki ang anak mo at sasabihin sa buong mundo na ang native language natin ay para lang sa mga katulong and tindera. Masyadong mahangin at mayabang ang dating. At bakit – gaano ba sya kagaling mag Ingles ?? Wala ba syang accent katulad ni Anderson Cooper of CNN ? o di kaya Piers Morgan ?

  190. lex
    September 25, 2011 at 8:46 pm

    Isa lang ang puno’t dulo ng argumento dito, Maaring opinyon ang isinulat ni Soriano pero may kaakibat na responsibilidad ang pagpapalimbag ng kanyang isinulat. Kung maraming tao ang nakaramdam ng hindi pagsang-ayon sa kanyang isinull ay marahil na may pagkukulang ang manunulat. “Irresponsible journalism”. Ito ang dahilan kung bakit may mga protesta ang mga Filipino community sa ibang bansa laban sa pagsasabi ng masama laban sa ating bansa. Ito din ang dahilan kung paano nagsimula ang mga kaisipan ng “genocide” o paglipol sa mababang uri ng lipunan. Kailangan nya sigurong panuorin yung “freedom writers” para mamulat sya. Kahit paulit-ulitin kong basahin ang sinulat ni Soriano wala ni anong mungkahi sa manunulat kung paano mapapaunlad ang sarili nyang wika bagkus tinuldukan nya sa pag-akap ng wikang banyaga. Para sa mga nagsasabing “the truth hurts” Tama kayong lahat. masakit ang katotohanan na madami sa ating pilipino ang bukas palad ang pagtanggap sa kaisipang banyaga na pinagtibay ng daan taon nating pagkasakop mula sa mga banyaga. Masakit na binlewala ng marami sa atin ang mga binuwis na buhay ng mga bayaning nkipaglaban para sa sarili nating kalayaan. At masakit na sinasang-ayunan ng marami na dapat na makilala tayo bilang kanilang “little brown brothers” na syang ginamit ng Presidente ng US para sakupin ang ating bansa dahil sa kanyang panaginip at tinawag nya itong “Benevolent assimilation”. Ito lahat ang masakit na katotohanan na sinasabi ninyo na kung sakali din na mabibigyan kayo ng pagkakataong pumili bilang sariling bansa ang Pilipinas o kasapi ng estado ng US ay siguradong ang boto ay sa huli. Ito marahil ang sinasabi nating masakit na katotohanan. Tsktsk.

  191. lex
    September 25, 2011 at 10:07 pm

    Just to add-up, what he had written is not a fact but his own reality. If you know your logic, you cannot conclude a single event or reality as a truth for all people around you if you do you’ll commit a fallacy. What the author stated is his own reality so to those who are claiming that this is a fact or this is the truth, please think again. Facts are absolute unless can be argued and disputed. It’s an axiom in the language of numbers. This article is published irresponsibly and that is the reason why it is being criticized and scrutinized.
    For me these particular statements are the one which makes this entry a complete failure.

    “But perhaps this is not so bad in a society of rotten beef and stinking fish. For while Filipino may be the language of identity, it is the language of the streets. It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.

    It is neither the language of the classroom and the laboratory, nor the language of the boardroom, the court room, or the operating room. It is not the language of privilege. I may be disconnected from my being Filipino, but with a tongue of privilege I will always have my connections…”

    Have you ever been to every classroom? I bet most of the teachers in the entire country uses a combination of Filipino and English to explain the subject be it in math, chemistry, physics, etc. How about the boardroom? Are you really sure that all of the board members always hold their meetings in English? I’d make another bet that even in a corporate meeting who are all Filipinos they’d still discuss it in Filipino and English unless there is a foreigner client present. We usually do this to further explain, understand what should be discussed and how can we achieve it. How about the operating room? Please stop watching to many foreign medical series like E.R, niptuck, House and go out to a real hospital like PGH and just observe how they speak to their colleagues when doing an operation. For Court rooms, although it is not stated in his entry, Just go to the Congress and watch their session. Not every time our congressmen do their speeches in English.

    My point is, as a Filipino, we used both language everyday in our life so to speak that Filipino is just a language of the street and English is the language of the learned is pure mockery to our identity as a Filipino. It’s crazy for one to accept this and be happy about this because he was able to slap it in every Filipino’s face who was able to read the article.

    If english, is not the Universal language, I bet he will still say that the other language is the language of the learned because he knows it and he’s comfortable using it compared to Filipino.

    It’s just sad that other countries are trying to learn the language, (ask some exchange student from other countries like korea, russia etc) and they even have a course about Philippines study while our countrymen are not proud of it.

  192. September 25, 2011 at 10:14 pm

    nakakalungkot. English? universal language matatanggap ko pa- pwede pa siguro kasi most popular and understood by most of the world’s population. pero wag naman sang gawing language of the learned… sige… maraming syang sinabi na sumasalamin sa reyalidad ng bansa. totoo at nakakalungkot. pero yung bastusin mo yung sarili mong kultura, ibang usapan na un, nkakaawa tong batang to. truth hurts talaga pero hindi dahil sumasang-ayon ako na ang filipino ay language na ginagamit lang sa kalye, pero dahil marami sa pilipino ngayon ay katulad nito ni soriano. XENOCENTRIC. anu na lang mangyayari sa atin kung parami na ng parami ang mga taong ganito. sana subukan niyang kilalanin ang SARILI NIYANG WIKA. tumambay siya sa mga library kung kinakailangan. kahabaghabag na sasabihin niyang “mother language” nia ang english gayong pilipino sya. siguradong walang nabasang matinong artikulong filipino ito habang lumalaki siya. walang pagkakakilanlan. walang pagmamahal sa sariling wika at kultura. sana kinilala niya muna ang filipino bago siya nagsalita at napublish, oo, opinyon niya yan at entitled tayo sa kanya kanyang opinyon. pero meron tinatawag na responsible journalism. nkaka-disappoint siya. biktima siya ng sarili niyang social class. sobrang xenocentric ang pagsulat nia ng artikulo niya… ito ang dahilan kung bakit madami ang nagagalit. he’s directly implying that the filipino language is inferior. natatawa ako sa mga nagsasabi na bakit sya kinokontra sa pamamagitan english din or taglish. wala naman problema at hindi na mahalaga kung anung lengwahe pa gamitin. ang mahalaga lang ay HINDI TAYO MAKALIMOT at hindi ibaba ang pagtingin sa sariling wika. i’m proud to say that Filipino is my mother language. at siya naman… wag na cia dito sa pinas di bagay… hilaw na idiyalismo meron sya. dun na lang sya kay uncle sam at enjoyin niyang tawaganin syang “little brown brother”. nakakaloka. pilipinong english ang mother language. haha.

  193. The Patriot
    September 26, 2011 at 12:00 am

    we are so damn proud of country but we are not proud when someone like Soriano disses our national language. Soriano can brag about himself all the way to the high heavens and say he’s the best English speaker it town. It’s like someone bragging he’s got a new car – I don’t care. But when he turns around to say my car is ugly, I take offense – even if it is the truth. Why ? Dahil mayabang at mahangin yung tao. Hindi makuntento sa karangyaan nya – lalaiitin pa ang hindi makaabot sa narating niya.

  194. waistline32
    September 27, 2011 at 9:07 am

    Kayo naman masyado kayong harsh. Di nyo ba alam allergic ang mga Atenista sa word na “Elitista”?

    Don’t be so harsh! Nahuhurt kami when you say we don’t love our country. We get hurt when you say we think little of the manongs. Coz you know what? The truth hurts, dudeparechongman!

    Umm yaya, can you make me sundo na? The interwebs are making me weewee eh.

  195. Filphile
    October 2, 2011 at 5:01 pm

    This paper is revolting.
    As a French citizen who lived and worked in the Philippines twenty years ago, I felt the need to learn Tagalog in order to relate to those people whom Mr. Soriano seems to despise so much. I am appalled that a Filipino citizen has never felt the same need
    Here is what I would object to him:
    — does he think it positive for his country that a social class speaks a language and another does not?
    — his point of view can be reversed. For a tindera, English is just the language that makes it possible to speak to some of her clients, or to this “élite” class that has proved to be so consistently unable to govern the Philippines properly, in spite of their command of English.
    — All children are perfectly capable of learning two languages (except, perhaps, Mr. Soriano).
    — Philippine languages (Tagalog but also Cebuano, Ilokano and many others) are a cultural treasure that linguists all over the world have come to appreciate. I think that Tagalog is a fascinating language, and I am not alone to think that way. Mr. Soriano should have the same curiosity for languages as for math, sciences etc. His eyes would open to a subject that, I assure him, is well worth exploring.
    — What is Mr Soriano’s plan for the future? The prohibition of Tagalog? Whether he likes it or not, Tagalog exists.
    — If Mr Soriano is right, then we have to enforce the use of English on all the planet and prohibit ALL other languages. Unfortunately, some nations stubbornly take pride in their language, culture, literature etc.
    — Personally, I’d rather hear pure Tagalog than Taglish, which sometimes (but not always) betrays the fact that the speaker does not have a perfect command of either language.
    — by the way, it is a pity that Mr. Soriano, in spite of his exposure to a western culture, has not come to absorb one of the values of western science: curiosity, and an interest for the diversity of languages, cultures, societies (which promoted sciences such as ethnology, anthropology, linguistics etc.).
    — It is perfectly true that English has given many jobs to Filipinos, but, as I said, children are capable of learning two (or even) three languages without much effort.

  196. Jezz
    October 10, 2011 at 10:03 pm

    “It might have the capacity to be the language of learning, but it is not the language of the learned.

    It is not the language of privilege. I may be disconnected from my being Filipino, but with a tongue of privilege I will always have my connections.

    So I have my education to thank for making English my mother language.”

    – hindi ba ito yung tinatawag na read between the lines?

  197. Ciara
    October 24, 2011 at 8:37 pm

    ANSAVEH?!

  198. just
    February 25, 2012 at 11:42 am

    POOR YOU STUPID TANGALOGS… ALL YOU CAN DO IS WHINE. YOU ARE ALL MORONS TAGALOGS. READ SOMETHING INSIGHTFUL, HERE IT IS…

  199. PH
    February 18, 2013 at 1:45 am

    Article niya=Opinyon niya
    Comment niyo=Opinyon niyo
    ok?
    Eto pala opinyon ko.(sa isang salita)
    Xenocentrism.

  1. August 26, 2011 at 10:17 pm
  2. August 27, 2011 at 6:53 pm
  3. August 27, 2011 at 7:57 pm

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