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Pinoy speak as brand name – “Tisyu” (toylet peyper)

January 3, 2017 Leave a comment

with the brand name “Tisyu”, this is not a joke, there is no mistaking what kind of product it is, specially for Filipinos. (although we are guessing English speakers will get it too.) it is exactly how we say it. we may previously have not known how it is spelled, but now we do thanks to this brand of toylet peyper (this bit is all mine).

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i was  in the supermarket for other things and just happened to  pass this particular display. while i  as not looking to buy toilet paper, this brand called out to me and caught my attention, the brand name spoke loudly. how could i resist?

ok, so it made me laugh. but it is a registered brand name and the product  was on an island display  – in between the laughter, i had to take this brand seriously. an island display is the most expensive display in a supermarket.

the product is very proud of its brand name. it says so on the shelf – “proudly produktong pinoy”.

this is the marketing question – so we have here a product used to wipe what we do not want to touch with our bare hands under there, behind us that its brand positioning  that is on pinoy nationalism that one can’t miss because it’s actually on the brand name.

the big question is for this kind of product, is nationalism a motivator for purchase?

 

~~mindscape landmark ~~

Budweiser’s “Lost Dog” TV ad at Super Bowl 2015 – Americana, the heart and the beer

February 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Budweiser has a habit of airing ads at the Super Bowl that is decidedly American. this one at the 2015 Super Bowl is no exception. it has the feel, looks and tone of the everyday American, even the cowboy, but it has heart too. delivering the heart part is of course always done best with a cute puppy. with all these things in the brew, how can we resist? come on, lets pop open a Budweiser now!

McDonald’s makes a goal with this promo that will be aired at Super Bowl 2015

January 31, 2015 Leave a comment

this is really a great promo. it is very creative and a perfect match to the advertising brand sell campaign of McDonald’s. it is rare to see promos that work so perfectly well with brand sell advertising.

McDonald’s has been running the “loving it” campaign in the US. in this promo, some customers will be chosen to pay for their McDonald’s orders with “acts of love” rather than money, acts of love like calling your mother to tell her you love her or a family told to do a group hug. they will air this promo TV ad at the upcoming Super Bowl 2015 this weekend in the US.

ad visuals that kill interest – gross out potential subscribers

January 4, 2015 Leave a comment

we saw this ad at facebook. it is an ad for an iOS app where all you do is say the foreign words and the app will translate the words into your preferred language for you to understand what they mean.

that is potentially a great idea for an app except that the app is being sold using this visual in the ad.

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i don’t know about you but to me nothing in that visual is pleasing or inviting. it is gross, scary and feels very, very painful. i don’t know how many FB users will find that visual appealing or enticing for them to go to the app store to buy the app because of that visual.

one of the principles in good advertising is visuals that work hard. one way to achieve that is have an image that visualizes the benefit.

yes, okay that visual does the latter – the visual is showing the closed zippered mouth is being opened for it to be able to speak. that is what the app is supposed to do – open the mouths of a foreign language so you can understand them. a closed zippered mouth is something we will not be able to understand.

while the zippered mouth being opened is what the app does, the choice of the zipper on the mouth goes beyond the message. the visual delivers another message which we think is more compelling and more powerful – that of pain and being grossed out. we can have a tagline that says “it’s so good you will kill yourself to get it” to communicate strong desirability but having a visual to execute that thought with something like someone blowing your brains out with a gun will not do it.

this ad forgets that there are other considerations other than accurately visualizing the message. a great  ad is a combination of many components and each of these components while they should work well together, all should also help the ad sell. one of the components not working for the ad and in this case killing the ad will make the whole ad fail.

this is a WAWAM!

~~~mindscape landmark~~~
carlo arvisu

 

 

consumer data is king, consumer insight is the queen

January 3, 2015 Leave a comment

“consumer-driven-data” – that is a principle in marketing that is central in any marketing or advertising plan. it is also often used and referred to in many marketing and advertising plans and yet in reality it is hardly used and even more often very few really know what it is and how to find it. it is in many ways something of one of the most “lip service” done in marketing and advertising (“strategic” is another lip service”).

here is one article we found at the Washington Post on fashion retailer Timberland where consumer data is king and was used to renew and in many ways reinvent the brand to a successful turn-around. while consumer data is king, the consumer insight is queen.

always, it is not enough to have consumer data, what is equally important and to some degree slightly more important is to know how to understand, interpret and translate consumer data into a consumer insight that is used in marketing and advertising plans.

it is in that bridge between consumer data and consumer insight where most marketing and advertising practitioners fail at or are weak at.

How Timberland used customer data to reboot its brand

STRATHAM, N.H. — There are few shoes more recognizable than theTimberland yellow boot. You know the one: The high-top styling, the sturdy-looking nubuck leather, the rubber lug sole to protect feet from sheets of rain or piles of snow.

But the durable boot — and the rest of Timberland’s footwear and apparel line — was having trouble weathering a fast-changing retail climate.

Timberland’s revenue was basically flat from 2006 to 2012. It was losing market share in the Americas, its home turf and most crucial market. And it was barreling forward with a confusing and slapdash patchwork of marketing and product strategies.timberland

Here in the United States, it had become something of a hip-hop brand as rappers name-checked “Timbs” in countless songs. In Asia, it was thought of as a comfort brand; in Italy, it was more fashion-oriented. Still more customers perceived Timberland as gear for the rugged outdoorsman, the kind of guy who hikes in the woods for days with nothing but his backpack and his Eagle Scout skills.

“The brand had become stale in many ways, and the focus wasn’t there,” said Stewart Whitney, Timberland’s president.

In the past year, though, Timberland has staged an impressive turnaround, with salessurging 15 percent in the most recent quarter even as the broader retail industry has posted only modest growth. Its sales have improved in every global market and every product category, delivering a fatter profit margin — about 13 percent in 2014, up from 8 percent in 2011.

Timberland has revamped everything from its product design to marketing to merchandising strategies. And data science provided the fuel and the framework for each of its changes.

The company says that the cornerstone of the comeback has been a two-year customer study in which it collected data from 18,000 people across eight countries. In analyzing the trove of responses, Timberland was able to diagnose its problems and to zero in on its ideal customer — an urban dweller with a casual interest in the outdoors.

“Research wasn’t a driving factor as much in the previous 20 years,” said Jim Davey, vice president of global marketing. “It was kind of a product-driven organization.”

This data-driven approach was implemented after the family-run business was bought in 2011 by VF Corp., an $11 billion apparel company based in Greensboro, N.C., that has undertaken a similar analysis at other brands, including the North Face and Vans.

read the rest here : http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2015/01/02/how-timberland-used-customer-data-to-reboot-its-brand/

what is this queen? how do we define and how do we get this queen that is consumer insight?

1. consumer data is not consumer insight – results from consumer research, be it quantitative or qualitative is NOT yet consumer insight, they are just raw data on consumer information, attitudes or preferences. these are just raw data that needs to put into some kind of a mental machine that will churn own consumer insight. many confuse “consumer data” and “consumer insight” as one and the same as when they certainly are not.

for consumer data to become consumer insight, you need to put a few of them together, connect them into a sensible whole and get them to jump out of a trampoline. consumer insight is something that needs to leap out of something, a composite of many points where eventually what comes out is very different from what came in.

2. your experiences or observations, those of the advertising and marketing executives, from the client or from the ad agency is NOT consumer insight nor is it the penultimate consumer data – okay, fine what you or your client think may be part of consumer data and consumer insight, it is not in no way the whole thing or even the core of what consumer data and consumer insight is. a person or even several people’s points of view, experiences or observations are of course valid but they may not be what most of the consumers think and feel. they may or may not be the prevailing and most dominant among the target market. the real and maybe the painful truth is that we, those of us in marketing and advertising are NOT the target market or target audience. our views and experiences are at best anecdotal and taking them as THE consumer data and consumer insight is like playing russian roulette.

3. once the right consumer insight is discovered, it becomes magic where everything makes sense, it gains power on its own and everything flows – that is how powerful consumer insights are. once you find it, your marketing and advertising plan will flow very smoothly from start to finish. you will see that ideas, concepts and strategies build on each other, on to like a strong pyramid. that is how consumer insights are used – they become the core of what you do,

it is possible to have several consumer insights and several may be used in a marketing and advertising plan but there will be a very clear order of things where the weight of one is the shadow of the rest.

we have been witness to just how powerful a consumer insight is. finding it defines the success of a brand. do not use it as lip service, take it seriously, its discovery will make you.

 

~~~mindscape landmark~~~
carlo arvisu

 

Most Viewed Video Advertising Campaign Of 2014

December 3, 2014 Leave a comment

Top Ten Most Viewed Video Advertising Campaigns of 2014

While First Kiss tops the chart, the other 9 places belong to well-known brands, veterans of successful marketing campaigns. 4 of the 10 most viewed ads revolved around the 2014 World Cup, with Nike, Samsung, and adidas attracting 306 million views between them. The average World Cup themed campaign ad generated nearly 3x the amount of average views for a branded video campaign compared to 2013.

  1. Wren’s “First Kiss”: True Reach of 156,670,932 views
  2. Nike’s “Risk Everything”: True Reach of 138,929,384 views
  3. Nike’s “The Last Game”: True Reach of 122,249,570 views
  4. Samsung’s “Galaxy 11 The Training”: True Reach of 78,130,824 views
  5. Always’ “#LikeAGirl”: True Reach of 60,281,400 views
  6. Turkish Airlines’ “#EpicFood”: True Reach of 59,549,152 views
  7. Budweiser’s “Puppy Love”: True Reach of 59,074,980 views
  8. Dove’s “Patches”: True Reach of 58,645,812 views
  9. Samsung’s “Official Introduction”: True Reach of 52,692,263 views
  10. adidas’ “The Dream”: True Reach of 47,828,815 views

source : http://www.reelseo.com/first-kiss-viewed-video-advertising-campaign-2014/

Wren’s “First Kiss” Overtakes World Cup Campaigns as The Most Viewed Campaign of 2014

read here : https://finance.yahoo.com/news/wren-first-kiss-overtakes-world-140000694.html

 

Coca-Cola’s Fairlife Milk ads – sexist, sexy, senseless or strategic?

December 2, 2014 Leave a comment

yes, you read it right – it is “Coca-Cola”. the drink company that we all know for its Coke drink in that familiar red colored bottles launched a brand called Fairlife, a milk product and the advertising campaign they launched it with is calling a lot of attention. the ads are called even by the company as “pin-up girls” and that is a great summation of what the ads are – they are a throwback to the 50’s pin-up girls of the Marilyn Monroe type of pictures and posters US soldiers used to have in their lockers while at war in Europe. for these ads, pin-up means sexy girls showing a lot of flesh, long legs in particular but this time liquid milk is covering the bodies of the pin-up girls.

first time we read about it, the article described the ads a “naked girls covered with milk”. that of course caught our attention but when we saw the ads, we thought the description was too much hyped with imagination, “naked girls” is something that did not come up to our minds. yes of course with the liquid milk as the clothes of the women, it means the girls are naked under the liquid milk. but then again aren’t we all naked under our own clothes?

the over-imagination aside (pun intended), we looked at the ads and asked ourselves several questions:

 

are the ads sexy? no, they are not. sure they show long legs and the women in them have bodies that will allow them to join beauty contests but sexy is not what we see in the ads. it did not inspire us to think sex when we saw the ads. what we saw were good looking women in the ads. not seeing sexy or sex in the ads may be a function of the proliferation of images in media and the internet that are far more sexual and body baring than these ones. heck, we recently saw the magazine cover of Kim Kardashian in full nude. compare these images to that and these are not at all sexy. it also helps that the over-all concept of the ads is the 50’s pin-up girls. it did not make me think of my grandmother but there is a certain playfulness and innocence when you think of the 50’s now that it is 2014.

are the ads senseless? no it’s not. it does make a good argument for being sensible as an ad. what it is doing is equating health with looking good. health to many of us humans is invisible and we need a lot of help to visualize health. doctors and science give us a picture of “healthy” through lab tests and numbers that show how much cholesterol we have in our body. but after a few seconds of seeing those numbers, we quickly forget how healthy looks like. seeing abs, muscles and in this case well proportioned bodies and long legs are excellent visualizations of “healthy”. they are memorable images that we usually keep in our minds as our goal in life and as we age.

are the ads strategic? yes, we think it is. the choices of the elements in the ads – liquid milk, nice looking bodies, women and health do have a certain strategic flair to them. this is the first time we are being asked to look at milk and what it does to our health in this way. what we are used to are children, cows and nature. the imagery is very eloquent.

are the ads sexist? first, the word “sexist” is one that can be very confusing to many. perhaps because it is a word that has been used as a weapon too many times and that it carries so much emotions that the real meaning of it has been hidden from many of us. if your target audience is women, it is not sexist at all. milk is a health drink and it is most useful for women for its calcium content and its importance to women. it can’t be sexist if women are the brand’s primary target market and target audience.

in essence this is what we are saying – we all got to chill! and yes, we do like the ads.

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